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Thursday, March 19
 

9:00am

cape verde social (un) sustainability
The format of the hypermedia cape verde social [un]sustainability was conceived with the goal of bringing forth a systemic understanding of the concept of sustainability. We understand the need to subvert the current environmentalist paradigm in the Cabo-verdean context of scarce natural resources and a large, economically fragile population. Instead of blaming the population, especially women, for the rampant extraction of sand and firewood which have high environmental impact, our work reveals the national supply chain, particularly in construction, and shortages that propel people to undertake unhealthy, risky, poorly remunerated work with high environmental impact. Therefore, justice must guide environmental protection.  

In this sense, the cape verde social [un]sustainability site entry point already introduces the four pillars of the narrative: water, firewood, sand, and territory, which are synthesized in the menu icons of the main menu of the interactive video.

A series of data, illustrations, films and critical photo montages are unveiled along the navigation paths to invite reflection and understanding of a wide cycle in the production of environmental impacts, especially in poor countries. View this project online: http://www.xucollective.net/unsustainability

Speakers
PA

Patti Anahory

Patricia Anahory is an architect and designer. She holds a Masters in architecture from Princeton University (USA) and her undergraduate degree from the Boston Architectural College. Her academic work questioned the presupposed relationships of place and identity, as well as the social and spatial definitions of boundaries in articulation with issues of gender, society of control and architecture. She worked in architecture offices in New York... Read More →
SD

Salif Diallo

Salif Diallo is a trans-media designer and a PhD candidate in Design at the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). He holds a degree in Multimedia Design and Technology from the School of Art and Design of Caldas da Rainha (Portugal), as well as a post-graduate degree in Web Design from the School of Arts and Technology of Lisbon (ESTAL/Portugal). He obtained Masters’ degrees in Inter-media Design from the University of Barcelona... Read More →
AM

Andreia Moassab

Andreia Moassab, PhD, is an architect and urban planner. She holds a Masters degree and a Doctorate in Communication and Semiotics from the Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (PUCSP / Brazil). She did a Doctoral internship at the Centro de Estudos Sociais, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). She is author of the book Brasil Periferia(s): a Comunicação Insurgente do Hip-Hop (Educ/Fapesp, 2011... Read More →


Thursday March 19, 2015 9:00am - 11:59pm
Virtual/Online

7:00pm

Night Gallery
The event marks the openning of the art and installation program of the conference. 

The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 

Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution …


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
RC

Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Thursday March 19, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281
 
Friday, March 20
 

7:00pm

Night Gallery
The event marks the openning of the art and installation program of the conference. 

The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 

Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution …


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
RC

Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Friday March 20, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281
 
Saturday, March 21
 

4:00pm

Balance-Unbalance 2015 Program Launch, World Water Day Celebrations & Water Wheel Book Launch
Join us online and around the world to officially launch the Balance-Unbalance 2015 program on WaterWheel! This session will include a book launch, film screening, performances, program highlights from the 2015 conference directors Garth Paine and Sabine Feisst, and a presentation from Balance-Unbalance founder Ricardo Dal Farra.

To participate in this virtual event please visit the following link: http://water-wheel.net/taps/dock/792.

Program Overview:

In celebration of World Water Day, we are launching the WaterWheel e-book, a significant publication resulting from the 2014 World Water Day Symposium. Science, art, ecology, community and youth respond to the theme: “Water Views: Caring and Daring.”

An astonishing number and variety of entries – 125 articles & 540 pages – makes this book a rich collection of ongoing work around the globe, often with a local focus, on raising awareness and responding to water issues.

450 participants from 34 countries across 5 continents interacted with an audience ‘live’ on the Internet & in 18 physical venues or ‘nodes’ through Waterwheel, an online platform dedicated to water. The symposium, held 17-23 March 2014, also integrated youth & inter-generational dialogue with the "Voice of the Future" strand.

Transversal knowledge and multidisciplinarity across cultures and languages shaped the content and structure of the e-book. The nine richly illustrated chapters contain three types of entries, based on the presentation given as part of the Symposium: “Splash”– project overview, “Ripple”– detailed project description, and “Wave”– peer-reviewed article on original research.

Download the e-book here: http://blog.water-wheel.net/2015/02/e-book-water-views-3WDS14.html.

Following the World Water Day celebration and e-book launch, Balance-Unbalance conference conveners Garth Paine and Sabine Feisst will officially launch the 2015 conference program. This will be followed by virtual program highlights with Leah Barclay, including a parallel Balance-Unbalance event happening in the Pacific Islands. The session will conclude with a presentation from Balance-Unbalance founder Ricardo Dal Farra, outlining the history and significance of this conference series.

Anyone, anywhere in the world, can participate in this session. Please use this time zone converter to confirm the program times in your location: www.timeanddate.com.

Speakers
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
RD

Ricardo Dal Farra

Dr. Ricardo Dal Farra is professor of electroacoustic music and media arts at Concordia University, Canada and director of the Electronic Arts Research Centre (CEIArtE) at the National University of Tres de Febrero, Argentina. | | He has been director of Hexagram, the Centre for Research-Creation in Media Arts and Technologies, Canada; researcher on electroacoustic music and media arts history for UNESCO, France; director of the Multimedia... Read More →
avatar for Sabine Feisst

Sabine Feisst

Professor of Music, Arizona State University
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American... Read More →
SF

Suzon Fuks

Suzon Fuks is an intermedia artist, choreographer and director exploring the integration and interaction of the body and moving image through performance, screen, installation and online work (http://suzonfuks.net). During her Australia Council for the Arts Fellowship (2009-12), she initiated and co-founded Waterwheel, a collaborative online venue for streaming, mixing and sharing media & ideas about Water, as a topic and metaphor... Read More →
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →


Saturday March 21, 2015 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Virtual/Online

6:00pm

World Water Day Virtual Film Screening: Water Music
Leweton Cultural Group hails from the remote tropical northern islands of Gaua and Merelava in Vanuatu, and live in a village in Espiritu Santo where they present, share, and maintain their unique cultural traditions and practises across cultures and generations. This film is the first of its kind, welcoming viewers to explore the life and customs of the village, the mesmerising women’s water music and the energetic sounds of String band Matto. Viewers will be humbled by their friendly and gentle natures, inspired by their simple lifestyles, and captivated by their performances.

This exclusive live stream for Balance-Unbalance 2015 celebrates World Water Day 2015 and connects the conference's themes to an Island community that is experiencing the true ramifications of climate change.

The Leweton Cultural Group performing Vanuatu Women’s Water Music were a highlight for many at Balance-Unbalance 2013 in Australia, and we are thrilled to showcase their new film. 

The Water Music film will be introduced during the Balance-Unbalance program launch event on WaterWheel. You can participate online by clicking the following link:  

http://water-wheel.net/taps/dock/792

The program launch event begins at 4pm Phoenix time. You can use this link to find the start time at your location - http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?msg=%22Water+Views:+Caring+and+Daring%22+e-book+launch,+part+1&iso=20150322T09&p1=47 

STREAMING LINK FOR VANUATU WOMEN'S WATER MUSIC FILM: https://theplanetspins.vhx.tv/buy/vanuatu-women-s-water-music 

Please click the link above to stream the film at the programmed time on World Water Day. Please note, the cost to stream the film is $5.00. 

This fee will also enable you to download a HD copy of the film that you can watch anytime, forever! It's your digital copy.

The funding generated from the film streaming goes directly to the communities in Vanuatu and will assist in the difficult process of rebuilding their communities after the catastrophic damage of Cyclone Pam last week.  

The film received a five star review in the current issue of Songlines, the internationally renowned world music magazine. 

We are encouraging everyone to stream the film simultaneously at the programmed time and join the conversation via social media. It is no problem if you start slightly earlier or later or need to pause the film during the stream. 

We encourage everyone to show their support for Vanuatu on World Water Day by using the following official hashtags on social media platforms during or after the virtual event.    

Balance-Unbalance International Conference 2015 - #Balance15 

Vanuatu Women’s Water Music Film - #WaterMusic #Vanuatu

World Water Day 2015 - #WorldWaterDay #WWD2015 

We will collect tweets and social media posts and share them with the communities after the event. 



Speakers
avatar for Leweton Cultural Group

Leweton Cultural Group

Leweton is a community on the Island of Santo, Vanuatu. Leweton is a cultural experience that is made up of related families from 6 villages from the islands of Merelava and Gaua. Since 2008 we have been sharing our cultural experience with visitors from all around the world. We invite guests into our village lifestyle where they can experience our traditional way of life.  | | Our village is home to the unique and amazing magical water... Read More →


Saturday March 21, 2015 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Virtual/Online

7:00pm

Night Gallery
The event marks the openning of the art and installation program of the conference. 

The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 

Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution …


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
RC

Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Saturday March 21, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281
 
Sunday, March 22
 

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Water Imbalance

The exhibit is open 8:00 am to 10:00 pm, March 22-29.  

Water Imbalance
is a curated exhibition planned for the Balance-Unbalance 2015 conference at the Arizona State University Tempe Campus.

Featuring the work of:
Kim Abeles
Sukey Bryan
Betsy Damon
Danielle Eubank
J.J. L’Heureux
Sandra Mueller
Melissa Reischman
Eco Art Collective


Curated by Sandra Mueller and Danielle Eubank

As the majority of the world’s population, it is incumbent upon women to be guardians of the future. We need to look after our people, our natural environment, and our water. Water is a shared resource amongst all people. It is our provider – for sustenance, fishing, farming and regulation of the earth’s climate. This is an exhibition that makes a statement about the unifying preciousness of water by documenting it all over the world with paintings, photography, mixed media, and installations by leading environmental women artists. 

The conceptual theme of the exhibition addresses the consequences of the human footprint globally by looking at the imbalance of the availability and cleanliness of water. We have specifically examined water scarcity, cleanliness, access, expanding deserts, urban engagement, climate change and diminishing glaciers that all reflect an unworkable imbalance. Artists included a written statement addressing water imbalance. For the visual theme, emphasis is on the view of water from a geographical perspective as well as a state of mind.  – Danielle Eubank, March 2015

Sandra Mueller
Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds. Her colorful abstract paintings and photographs have been shown broadly throughout the Pacific Rim region.

Danielle Eubank
Danielle Eubank is a painter interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. Danielle Eubank is an expedition artist in pursuit of painting all of the major bodies of water in the world. She is beginning by painting all of Earth’s oceans. She sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship, The Antigua, on an expedition to the High Arctic in Autumn 2014. She was an Expedition Artist on the Phoenicia, a replica 600 B.C. Phoenician vessel that circumnavigated Africa and was the Expedition Artist on the Borobudur Ship, a replica of an 8th century Indonesian boat that sailed around the African continent.  


Artists
BD

Betsy Damon

Betsy Damon is an eco-activist artist who works with water, site-specific sculpture, urban design and community. In 1998, Betsy created the Living Water Garden in Sichuan, China, a six-acre urban park that has become an icon for natural water-cleaning systems. She has worked on design teams, notably contributing the wetland system in the Beijing Olympic Park. In the US, Betsy has worked with communities, bringing together arts... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Eubank

Danielle Eubank

University of La Verne
Danielle Eubank is a painter and curator interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. She is painting all of the major bodies of water on the planet, starting with the oceans. In addition to her studio practice, Ms. Eubank is an expedition artist. She sailed aboard the tall ship, The Antigua, on an art and science expedition to the High Arctic in... Read More →
EC

Eco-Art Collective

The Eco-Art Collective is an activist group of the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art dedicated to sustainable stewardship of the environment. Participating Artists: Carolyn Applegate, Amy Bauer, Marie Cenkner, Danielle Eubank, Katherine Kean, Nancy Lissaman, Marion Melchiorre, Sandra Mueller, Annemarie Rawlinson, Seda Saar, Louise Wannier, Frances White.
KA

Kim Abeles

Kim Abeles' installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Among her many honors, Abeles has been recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation, Pollack-Krasner Foundation, and the California Arts Council. She is a 2014 Lucas Visual... Read More →
MR

Melissa Reischman

Melissa Reischman was born in Portland, Oregon. She studied graphic design at the Colorado Institute of Art and went on to build a career as an award-winning graphic designer. During this time she followed the urge to develop her own artistic vision through paintings and drawings, studying with Richard Bunkhall and Ray Turner at Art Center College of Design. Reischman’s work explores movement of light, color and atmosphere. Her paintings... Read More →
SM

Sandra Mueller

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds... Read More →
SB

Sukey Bryan

Sukey Bryan was born in New Jersey in 1961, and grew up in Connecticut and France. She graduated in 1983 from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Fine Arts and English. She worked for five years as a graphic designer in New York with Vignelli Associates, followed by three years of freelance work in San Francisco. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1990. Bryan received grants from... Read More →



Sunday March 22, 2015 8:00am - 10:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Art Exhibit: Old Graduate Sculpture Studio
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm, March 22-29. 

Fecundity
Bob Vanderbob

Fecundity: 1. the ability to cause or assist healthy growth; 2. the ability to produce offspring; 3. the creative power of the mind or imagination

Will the fecundity of our minds come to the rescue of biological fecundity? Will we collapse and go extinct, or adapt, survive and thrive? It is a delicate balance.

On one hand, the natural systems that sustain human activity are stretched to their limit. Biodiversity is dwindling. We humans are increasingly prey to fertility problems, due to the accumulation of pollution in our bodies. On the other, our understanding of biosystems is exploding. We are decoding nature’s fundamental processes at an accelerating pace with the help of the exponential rise in computing power. 

Whereas our ancestors conjured up potent fertility deities associated with pregnancy, birth, life, rainfall, harvest, love, sex and beauty, the dry and abstract vocabulary we use today in relation to fecundity is not exactly rousing: 'the environment', 'sustainability', 'biodiversity'...

With this installation, Bobvan proposes a mythological, poetic experience, a revitalization of the age-old archetype encompassing the nested metaphorical meanings of the notion of fecundity to include the agility of the mind and the potential of the imagination. 

The installation is inspired by a Neolithic fecundity figure found in Harappa, in the Indus Valley.

A 3D-printed female figure in unsmoothed low-poly, a metaphor for the human species as an ongoing work in progress, is balanced on her head. She becomes a screen onto which are projected images of life, energy, water, bacteria, sperm and ovules, electronic patterns, genetic and binary code. The modern-day 'power' icon is projected onto her skull, reminiscent of Neolithic representations of the vulva, a universal fecundity symbol. In stark contrast, images of desert landscapes in video negative and of Venus, Earth's barren sister planet, are projected onto the back wall. The whole installation is enshrined in a large mirror box, evoking the ongoingness of the universe-as-process by reflecting the fecundity figure ad infinitum in all directions. 

Fecundity is part of Bobvan's Artificial Mythology project; it is presented at Balance-Unbalance as a world premiere. 

ArtLAB Mobile ECO-STUDIO

Mobile Eco Studio is a social art project involving artist-led workshops, planting indigenous species in unused bits of land. It integrates indigenous culture, biology, and community engagement, and adds a unique approach to the related subjects of climate and culture. Its special relationship to the climate and culture of Arizona will help visitors at the conference become more familiar with this unique place and ecosystem.

Words for Water
Tracey Benson

Words for Water explores a diversity of languages, including Indigenous Australian languages, as a starting point to evoke a connection to water as the sustaining element of all life. Indigenous cultures have an acute understanding of and connection to the relationship between body, environment (site) and identity, and this project seeks to awaken this connection more broadly across cultures and practices.

Words for Water is an exploration into the many aspects of the chemical of H2O. Water makes up over 70 percent of the human body; it is essential for sustaining life and has massive social and cultural significance.

Water may seem ubiquitous, but it has some rather uncommon properties. At the atomic level, water can influence how life and landscapes are formed, such as how water moves through a plant and how rivers meander around bends. It is also the only chemical that be formed in three states – vapour, liquid and solid.

This project uses a range of mixed reality media approaches – the use of augmented media to ‘trigger’ sound and video, the development of a smart phone/tablet app, gallery and installation based exhibitions, and a projection work that bring this project together in a filmic, linear narrative.

Words for Water is seen as an ever-expanding project, allowing for infinite expansion of words, thoughts and stories related to water. The project has appeared at SCANZ2015, New Plymouth, New Zealand; Photoacess, October 2014; 3WDS14, Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium, March 2014; and Stage One of Words for Water was presented as part of the Transreal Topologies exhibition at the Royal Institute of Science in Adelaide, October 2013, held in conjunction with the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR).


Speakers
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →

Artists
BV

Bob Vanderbob

Bob Vanderbob, a.k.a. Bobvan, is an artist and composer based in Brussels (Belgium). He explores the interaction between art, mythology, science, and science-fiction to convey his poetic vision of the techno-human condition. He calls his project Artificial Mythology, a matrix of mythological modules, a modern myth-scape for the current context of technological acceleration.
DA

Desert ArtLAB

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary initiative dedicated to a public art practice exploring connections between ecology, technology, and community. Through multimedia performance, food practice, and visual and social art, desert ArtLAB seeks to inform a discourse of desert urban landscapes, while challenging residents to consider how native ecology can inform identity, equality and resilience in our desert culture and... Read More →
TB

Tracey Benson

Tracey Benson is a green geek/artist/researcher into connected communities, UX, WCAG, Gov.2.0, sustainability, tech/art synergies, maps and FOSS. Tracey has been active in a number of media arts communities: in 2007, she co-founded the Canberra chapter of dorkbot with Alexandra Gillespie and was also a moderator on the internationally renowned new media list –empyre- from 2005-07. She has participated in many international digital media... Read More →


Sunday March 22, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Old Graduate Sculpture Studio 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Balance-Unbalance 2015: EcoQuantum 2.0
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm March 22-29.

Robotanic Mobile Gardens--Soybots III
Shannon McMullen & Fabian Winkler

Climate, energy, agriculture, politics: the project Robotanic Mobile Gardens – SoyBots III belongs to a series of art installations and discursive interventions, collectively focused on critical gardening strategies which demonstrate just how deeply entangled these conditions are. In the global context, soybean production is at the heart of both climate change problems and suggested solutions to food security issues. Thus, soybean plants are mobilized for their significance to global food production, their strong association with a hybridity between nature and technology —in this case as a result of biotechnological strategies for increasing crop yields through genetic modification—and vulnerability to changing climate and water conditions as a result of global warming. 

Gardens express ideas and social relations; some are sites where art and technology produce material realities, social narratives and visualize politics. In this case, mobile gardens unite code, robotics and soybean plants (robotanics) to create a speculative interactive installation that suggests questions about climate, place and agriculture implicated in contemporary practices and values. As self-pollinating organisms in combination with a light-seeking mobile robotic platform, temperature and moisture sensors, soybean plants metaphorically address the evolving interdependence between humans and cultivated crops and the underlying political nature of photosynthesis. 

These relationships are expressed through three autonomous robotic platforms, outfitted with custom planter boxes containing soybean plants, that roam interior space in search of optimal light conditions and ideal temperatures while monitoring soil moisture to promote plant growth in local conditions. To identify optimal light conditions, the robot host employs a phototropic control strategy, using sensors to track and follow sunlight intensity or to locate LED grow lights. Moisture sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller trigger a flashing yellow light when moisture levels are too low, prompting humans to attend to the plants. Finally, temperature sensors are similarly used to allow the soybeans to indicate their need for increased or decreased warmth. ‘Shivering’ indicates a need for higher temperatures. In contrast, the robot will seek dimmer locations when it is too warm. With SoyBots III, soybeans become an ‘evocative object’ (Turkle, 2011) – something that can provoke reflection, speculation and attract emotion.  

Artists
FW

Fabian Winkler

Fabian Winkler is an artist working at the intersections of the moving image, sound, spatial structures and robotics. He explores the aesthetic potential and the cultural implications of seemingly well-known artifacts through the use of new technologies. Conceptually, his works are often influenced by archeological research into the history of technology and observations of social processes. Winkler is currently an Associate Professor of Visual... Read More →
SM

Shannon McMullen

Shannon McMullen is a jointly appointed Assistant Professor in the Electronic and Time-Based Art Program in the School of Visual and Performing Arts and in American Studies at Purdue University. She received a PhD in sociology from the University of California, San Diego, in 2007. Based on her fieldwork experience and dissertation writing in the areas of visual and material culture, Dr. McMullen has developed a creative practice that... Read More →


Sunday March 22, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Grant Street Atrium 605 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

7:00pm

Night Gallery
The event marks the openning of the art and installation program of the conference. 

The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 

Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution …


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
RC

Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Sunday March 22, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281
 
Monday, March 23
 

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Walking with Water
This exhibit is open 8:00 am-5:00 pm, March 22-29. 

World-Wide-Walks / between earth, water &sky / DESERTS
Peter D'Agostino

World-Wide-Walks have been performed on six continents over the past four decades. Initiated in 1973 as The Walk Series, these video "documentation/performances" evolved into video-web projects during the 1990s and mobile-locative media installations in the 2000s. World-Wide-Walks explore elements of natural, cultural and virtual identities: mixed realities of walking through physical environments and virtually surfing the web. Current projects focus on climate change and the effects of global warming to address concerns for a sustainable future related to ‘glocal’ - global / local – ecologies.

It is conceived as a trilogy of walk projects in the Chihuahuan, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts. The installation proposed for Balance-Unbalance 2015 is based on walks performed in the Chihuahuan Desert at White Sands, Los Alamos and Alamogordo. The mix of ‘natural-cultural-virtual’ concepts is most striking for me at these sites as boundaries for the convergence of nature and culture, spirituality and science. Here, at this crossroads in the desert where the ancient Native American stories of emergence from Mother Earth are told, it is also the site of the first Atomic Bomb detonation. ( The “Fat Boy” bomb on July 16, 1945 preceded “Little Boy”, August 6, Hiroshima; and “Fat Man,” August 9, Nagasaki.) One walk is around a “Fat Man,” a bomb casing on display at the White Sands Missile Range Museum. Walks around Soaptree Yucca plants are testaments to natural survival in the desert ecosystem; while another walk through a field of petroglyphs is about a time dating from the Ancestral Pueblo period of c. 1300 to 1600 AD. (Petroglyph National Monument on New Mexico's West Mesa near Albuquerque.)

Pink Noise 
Yolande Harris

Pink Noise challenges preconceptions about underwater sound by juxtaposing an idyllic video of the ocean surface with the overwhelming, yet often strangely beautiful, anthropogenic noise underneath. By involving the audience in an otherwise alien, inaccessible environment, the installation aims to establish a more empathetic relationship to the underwater world through the immersive experience of the artwork.

The installation consists of a video projection on the floor and a sound recording listened to on headphones. The headphones hang from the ceiling, centered over the video, about 18 inches from the floor (like a fishing line). At first, the audience only sees the video of colorful turquoise and pink light reflecting on the surface of the sea. In order to experience what is beneath the surface, the audience member must step into the video and put on the headphones, at which point s/he is immersed in the piece. The hydrophone recording, made at a Spanish National Marine Reserve at peak tourist season, reveals a surprising range of industrial sounds beneath the surface – loud thumps, grinds, and tones from boat engines, anchors and depth sounders. The underwater sonic environment sharply contrasts with the idyllic video of the surface at the same location, revealing the extent of noise pollution even in a protected marine habitat.

Pink Noise was previously exhibited at: Transmediale, Berlin, 2010; Issue Project Room, New York 2011 (screened version); WRO Media Art Biennale, Wroclaw, Poland 2011; MADATAC Festival, Madrid 2013.

Undercurrent
Teresa Connors & Shannon Harris

Undercurrent is one of a series of ongoing generative audiovisual installations which explores the notion of ecological performativity. Here, the term "ecological" refers to the philosophical school of thought which believes the world to be a network of interconnected and interdependent phenomena. Constructed in Max 6, this generative installation layers a network of visual and aural content that affect each other simultaneously to produce an ever-evolving work. The assets of this installation include oceanic audiovisual field recordings from the west coast of Canada, algorithmic data collected from an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), and real-time convolution of audio field recordings with samples acoustic instruments. The intention of this practice is to contribute in an artistic, experiential, and dynamical means to current thinking around material agency. I purpose that by doing so, creative practice can contribute towards the development of an ontological consideration of ecological performativity. By viewing the world as a network of phenomena that are fundamentally interconnected and interdependent, the result is a performative openness to the world that suggests a means by which to empathically engage, from a non-human exceptionalism perspective, with the complexities of being in, and of the world in the 21st century. Undercurrent is an attempt to foster a greater recognition of the ongoing and entangled ebb and flow of agency between humans and the environment.  

Speakers
PD

Peter D'Agostino

Peter d’Agostino’s pioneering photography, video and interactive projects have been exhibited internationally. Surveys of his work include: Interactivity and Intervention, 1978-99, Lehman College Art Gallery, New York; the World-Wide-Walks projects at the University Art Gallery, Bilbao, Spain (2012); and the University of Paris I Partheon-Sorbonne (2003). Major group exhibitions include: The Whitney Museum of American Art (Biennial... Read More →
YH

Yolande Harris

Yolande Harris is an artist engaged with sound, its image and its role in relating humans and their technologies to the environment. Her artistic projects take the form of audio-visual installations and performances, instruments, walks, performative lectures and writings. Her work is presented internationally in the context of visual art exhibitions, music venues and media art festivals and conferences, including MACBA Barcelona, Schirn... Read More →

Artists
SH

Shannon Harris

Shannon Harris is an artist whose film and video work reflect a creative practice that draws from the particulars and subjectivities of personal experience and landscape. The ways in which documentary and experimental film/video practices intersect, and the potential of expanded notions of documentary are areas of interest to her. Shannon’s work has been screened in North America, New Zealand and the EU. She attended Simon Fraser University... Read More →
TC

Teresa Connors

Teresa Connors is active in many aspects of music practice, being an acoustic/electroacoustic composer, opera singer, film scorer, and multimedia installation artist. She collaborates with many artists from diverse backgrounds and with different sensibilities. Originally from Newfoundland, Canada, Teresa holds a Master of Music degree in composition (1st class honours) from Waikato University in New Zealand and studied both composition and... Read More →


Monday March 23, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Digital Culture Gallery 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Water Imbalance

The exhibit is open 8:00 am to 10:00 pm, March 22-29.  

Water Imbalance
is a curated exhibition planned for the Balance-Unbalance 2015 conference at the Arizona State University Tempe Campus.

Featuring the work of:
Kim Abeles
Sukey Bryan
Betsy Damon
Danielle Eubank
J.J. L’Heureux
Sandra Mueller
Melissa Reischman
Eco Art Collective


Curated by Sandra Mueller and Danielle Eubank

As the majority of the world’s population, it is incumbent upon women to be guardians of the future. We need to look after our people, our natural environment, and our water. Water is a shared resource amongst all people. It is our provider – for sustenance, fishing, farming and regulation of the earth’s climate. This is an exhibition that makes a statement about the unifying preciousness of water by documenting it all over the world with paintings, photography, mixed media, and installations by leading environmental women artists. 

The conceptual theme of the exhibition addresses the consequences of the human footprint globally by looking at the imbalance of the availability and cleanliness of water. We have specifically examined water scarcity, cleanliness, access, expanding deserts, urban engagement, climate change and diminishing glaciers that all reflect an unworkable imbalance. Artists included a written statement addressing water imbalance. For the visual theme, emphasis is on the view of water from a geographical perspective as well as a state of mind.  – Danielle Eubank, March 2015

Sandra Mueller
Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds. Her colorful abstract paintings and photographs have been shown broadly throughout the Pacific Rim region.

Danielle Eubank
Danielle Eubank is a painter interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. Danielle Eubank is an expedition artist in pursuit of painting all of the major bodies of water in the world. She is beginning by painting all of Earth’s oceans. She sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship, The Antigua, on an expedition to the High Arctic in Autumn 2014. She was an Expedition Artist on the Phoenicia, a replica 600 B.C. Phoenician vessel that circumnavigated Africa and was the Expedition Artist on the Borobudur Ship, a replica of an 8th century Indonesian boat that sailed around the African continent.  


Artists
BD

Betsy Damon

Betsy Damon is an eco-activist artist who works with water, site-specific sculpture, urban design and community. In 1998, Betsy created the Living Water Garden in Sichuan, China, a six-acre urban park that has become an icon for natural water-cleaning systems. She has worked on design teams, notably contributing the wetland system in the Beijing Olympic Park. In the US, Betsy has worked with communities, bringing together arts... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Eubank

Danielle Eubank

University of La Verne
Danielle Eubank is a painter and curator interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. She is painting all of the major bodies of water on the planet, starting with the oceans. In addition to her studio practice, Ms. Eubank is an expedition artist. She sailed aboard the tall ship, The Antigua, on an art and science expedition to the High Arctic in... Read More →
EC

Eco-Art Collective

The Eco-Art Collective is an activist group of the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art dedicated to sustainable stewardship of the environment. Participating Artists: Carolyn Applegate, Amy Bauer, Marie Cenkner, Danielle Eubank, Katherine Kean, Nancy Lissaman, Marion Melchiorre, Sandra Mueller, Annemarie Rawlinson, Seda Saar, Louise Wannier, Frances White.
KA

Kim Abeles

Kim Abeles' installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Among her many honors, Abeles has been recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation, Pollack-Krasner Foundation, and the California Arts Council. She is a 2014 Lucas Visual... Read More →
MR

Melissa Reischman

Melissa Reischman was born in Portland, Oregon. She studied graphic design at the Colorado Institute of Art and went on to build a career as an award-winning graphic designer. During this time she followed the urge to develop her own artistic vision through paintings and drawings, studying with Richard Bunkhall and Ray Turner at Art Center College of Design. Reischman’s work explores movement of light, color and atmosphere. Her paintings... Read More →
SM

Sandra Mueller

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds... Read More →
SB

Sukey Bryan

Sukey Bryan was born in New Jersey in 1961, and grew up in Connecticut and France. She graduated in 1983 from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Fine Arts and English. She worked for five years as a graphic designer in New York with Vignelli Associates, followed by three years of freelance work in San Francisco. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1990. Bryan received grants from... Read More →


Monday March 23, 2015 8:00am - 10:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Art Exhibit: Old Graduate Sculpture Studio
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm, March 22-29. 

Fecundity
Bob Vanderbob

Fecundity: 1. the ability to cause or assist healthy growth; 2. the ability to produce offspring; 3. the creative power of the mind or imagination

Will the fecundity of our minds come to the rescue of biological fecundity? Will we collapse and go extinct, or adapt, survive and thrive? It is a delicate balance.

On one hand, the natural systems that sustain human activity are stretched to their limit. Biodiversity is dwindling. We humans are increasingly prey to fertility problems, due to the accumulation of pollution in our bodies. On the other, our understanding of biosystems is exploding. We are decoding nature’s fundamental processes at an accelerating pace with the help of the exponential rise in computing power. 

Whereas our ancestors conjured up potent fertility deities associated with pregnancy, birth, life, rainfall, harvest, love, sex and beauty, the dry and abstract vocabulary we use today in relation to fecundity is not exactly rousing: 'the environment', 'sustainability', 'biodiversity'...

With this installation, Bobvan proposes a mythological, poetic experience, a revitalization of the age-old archetype encompassing the nested metaphorical meanings of the notion of fecundity to include the agility of the mind and the potential of the imagination. 

The installation is inspired by a Neolithic fecundity figure found in Harappa, in the Indus Valley.

A 3D-printed female figure in unsmoothed low-poly, a metaphor for the human species as an ongoing work in progress, is balanced on her head. She becomes a screen onto which are projected images of life, energy, water, bacteria, sperm and ovules, electronic patterns, genetic and binary code. The modern-day 'power' icon is projected onto her skull, reminiscent of Neolithic representations of the vulva, a universal fecundity symbol. In stark contrast, images of desert landscapes in video negative and of Venus, Earth's barren sister planet, are projected onto the back wall. The whole installation is enshrined in a large mirror box, evoking the ongoingness of the universe-as-process by reflecting the fecundity figure ad infinitum in all directions. 

Fecundity is part of Bobvan's Artificial Mythology project; it is presented at Balance-Unbalance as a world premiere. 

ArtLAB Mobile ECO-STUDIO

Mobile Eco Studio is a social art project involving artist-led workshops, planting indigenous species in unused bits of land. It integrates indigenous culture, biology, and community engagement, and adds a unique approach to the related subjects of climate and culture. Its special relationship to the climate and culture of Arizona will help visitors at the conference become more familiar with this unique place and ecosystem.

Words for Water
Tracey Benson

Words for Water explores a diversity of languages, including Indigenous Australian languages, as a starting point to evoke a connection to water as the sustaining element of all life. Indigenous cultures have an acute understanding of and connection to the relationship between body, environment (site) and identity, and this project seeks to awaken this connection more broadly across cultures and practices.

Words for Water is an exploration into the many aspects of the chemical of H2O. Water makes up over 70 percent of the human body; it is essential for sustaining life and has massive social and cultural significance.

Water may seem ubiquitous, but it has some rather uncommon properties. At the atomic level, water can influence how life and landscapes are formed, such as how water moves through a plant and how rivers meander around bends. It is also the only chemical that be formed in three states – vapour, liquid and solid.

This project uses a range of mixed reality media approaches – the use of augmented media to ‘trigger’ sound and video, the development of a smart phone/tablet app, gallery and installation based exhibitions, and a projection work that bring this project together in a filmic, linear narrative.

Words for Water is seen as an ever-expanding project, allowing for infinite expansion of words, thoughts and stories related to water. The project has appeared at SCANZ2015, New Plymouth, New Zealand; Photoacess, October 2014; 3WDS14, Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium, March 2014; and Stage One of Words for Water was presented as part of the Transreal Topologies exhibition at the Royal Institute of Science in Adelaide, October 2013, held in conjunction with the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR).


Speakers
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →

Artists
BV

Bob Vanderbob

Bob Vanderbob, a.k.a. Bobvan, is an artist and composer based in Brussels (Belgium). He explores the interaction between art, mythology, science, and science-fiction to convey his poetic vision of the techno-human condition. He calls his project Artificial Mythology, a matrix of mythological modules, a modern myth-scape for the current context of technological acceleration.
DA

Desert ArtLAB

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary initiative dedicated to a public art practice exploring connections between ecology, technology, and community. Through multimedia performance, food practice, and visual and social art, desert ArtLAB seeks to inform a discourse of desert urban landscapes, while challenging residents to consider how native ecology can inform identity, equality and resilience in our desert culture and... Read More →
TB

Tracey Benson

Tracey Benson is a green geek/artist/researcher into connected communities, UX, WCAG, Gov.2.0, sustainability, tech/art synergies, maps and FOSS. Tracey has been active in a number of media arts communities: in 2007, she co-founded the Canberra chapter of dorkbot with Alexandra Gillespie and was also a moderator on the internationally renowned new media list –empyre- from 2005-07. She has participated in many international digital media... Read More →


Monday March 23, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Old Graduate Sculpture Studio 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Balance-Unbalance 2015: EcoQuantum 2.0
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm March 22-29.

Robotanic Mobile Gardens--Soybots III
Shannon McMullen & Fabian Winkler

Climate, energy, agriculture, politics: the project Robotanic Mobile Gardens – SoyBots III belongs to a series of art installations and discursive interventions, collectively focused on critical gardening strategies which demonstrate just how deeply entangled these conditions are. In the global context, soybean production is at the heart of both climate change problems and suggested solutions to food security issues. Thus, soybean plants are mobilized for their significance to global food production, their strong association with a hybridity between nature and technology —in this case as a result of biotechnological strategies for increasing crop yields through genetic modification—and vulnerability to changing climate and water conditions as a result of global warming. 

Gardens express ideas and social relations; some are sites where art and technology produce material realities, social narratives and visualize politics. In this case, mobile gardens unite code, robotics and soybean plants (robotanics) to create a speculative interactive installation that suggests questions about climate, place and agriculture implicated in contemporary practices and values. As self-pollinating organisms in combination with a light-seeking mobile robotic platform, temperature and moisture sensors, soybean plants metaphorically address the evolving interdependence between humans and cultivated crops and the underlying political nature of photosynthesis. 

These relationships are expressed through three autonomous robotic platforms, outfitted with custom planter boxes containing soybean plants, that roam interior space in search of optimal light conditions and ideal temperatures while monitoring soil moisture to promote plant growth in local conditions. To identify optimal light conditions, the robot host employs a phototropic control strategy, using sensors to track and follow sunlight intensity or to locate LED grow lights. Moisture sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller trigger a flashing yellow light when moisture levels are too low, prompting humans to attend to the plants. Finally, temperature sensors are similarly used to allow the soybeans to indicate their need for increased or decreased warmth. ‘Shivering’ indicates a need for higher temperatures. In contrast, the robot will seek dimmer locations when it is too warm. With SoyBots III, soybeans become an ‘evocative object’ (Turkle, 2011) – something that can provoke reflection, speculation and attract emotion.  

Artists
FW

Fabian Winkler

Fabian Winkler is an artist working at the intersections of the moving image, sound, spatial structures and robotics. He explores the aesthetic potential and the cultural implications of seemingly well-known artifacts through the use of new technologies. Conceptually, his works are often influenced by archeological research into the history of technology and observations of social processes. Winkler is currently an Associate Professor of Visual... Read More →
SM

Shannon McMullen

Shannon McMullen is a jointly appointed Assistant Professor in the Electronic and Time-Based Art Program in the School of Visual and Performing Arts and in American Studies at Purdue University. She received a PhD in sociology from the University of California, San Diego, in 2007. Based on her fieldwork experience and dissertation writing in the areas of visual and material culture, Dr. McMullen has developed a creative practice that... Read More →


Monday March 23, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Grant Street Atrium 605 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004
 
Tuesday, March 24
 

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Walking with Water
This exhibit is open 8:00 am-5:00 pm, March 22-29. 

World-Wide-Walks / between earth, water &sky / DESERTS
Peter D'Agostino

World-Wide-Walks have been performed on six continents over the past four decades. Initiated in 1973 as The Walk Series, these video "documentation/performances" evolved into video-web projects during the 1990s and mobile-locative media installations in the 2000s. World-Wide-Walks explore elements of natural, cultural and virtual identities: mixed realities of walking through physical environments and virtually surfing the web. Current projects focus on climate change and the effects of global warming to address concerns for a sustainable future related to ‘glocal’ - global / local – ecologies.

It is conceived as a trilogy of walk projects in the Chihuahuan, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts. The installation proposed for Balance-Unbalance 2015 is based on walks performed in the Chihuahuan Desert at White Sands, Los Alamos and Alamogordo. The mix of ‘natural-cultural-virtual’ concepts is most striking for me at these sites as boundaries for the convergence of nature and culture, spirituality and science. Here, at this crossroads in the desert where the ancient Native American stories of emergence from Mother Earth are told, it is also the site of the first Atomic Bomb detonation. ( The “Fat Boy” bomb on July 16, 1945 preceded “Little Boy”, August 6, Hiroshima; and “Fat Man,” August 9, Nagasaki.) One walk is around a “Fat Man,” a bomb casing on display at the White Sands Missile Range Museum. Walks around Soaptree Yucca plants are testaments to natural survival in the desert ecosystem; while another walk through a field of petroglyphs is about a time dating from the Ancestral Pueblo period of c. 1300 to 1600 AD. (Petroglyph National Monument on New Mexico's West Mesa near Albuquerque.)

Pink Noise 
Yolande Harris

Pink Noise challenges preconceptions about underwater sound by juxtaposing an idyllic video of the ocean surface with the overwhelming, yet often strangely beautiful, anthropogenic noise underneath. By involving the audience in an otherwise alien, inaccessible environment, the installation aims to establish a more empathetic relationship to the underwater world through the immersive experience of the artwork.

The installation consists of a video projection on the floor and a sound recording listened to on headphones. The headphones hang from the ceiling, centered over the video, about 18 inches from the floor (like a fishing line). At first, the audience only sees the video of colorful turquoise and pink light reflecting on the surface of the sea. In order to experience what is beneath the surface, the audience member must step into the video and put on the headphones, at which point s/he is immersed in the piece. The hydrophone recording, made at a Spanish National Marine Reserve at peak tourist season, reveals a surprising range of industrial sounds beneath the surface – loud thumps, grinds, and tones from boat engines, anchors and depth sounders. The underwater sonic environment sharply contrasts with the idyllic video of the surface at the same location, revealing the extent of noise pollution even in a protected marine habitat.

Pink Noise was previously exhibited at: Transmediale, Berlin, 2010; Issue Project Room, New York 2011 (screened version); WRO Media Art Biennale, Wroclaw, Poland 2011; MADATAC Festival, Madrid 2013.

Undercurrent
Teresa Connors & Shannon Harris

Undercurrent is one of a series of ongoing generative audiovisual installations which explores the notion of ecological performativity. Here, the term "ecological" refers to the philosophical school of thought which believes the world to be a network of interconnected and interdependent phenomena. Constructed in Max 6, this generative installation layers a network of visual and aural content that affect each other simultaneously to produce an ever-evolving work. The assets of this installation include oceanic audiovisual field recordings from the west coast of Canada, algorithmic data collected from an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), and real-time convolution of audio field recordings with samples acoustic instruments. The intention of this practice is to contribute in an artistic, experiential, and dynamical means to current thinking around material agency. I purpose that by doing so, creative practice can contribute towards the development of an ontological consideration of ecological performativity. By viewing the world as a network of phenomena that are fundamentally interconnected and interdependent, the result is a performative openness to the world that suggests a means by which to empathically engage, from a non-human exceptionalism perspective, with the complexities of being in, and of the world in the 21st century. Undercurrent is an attempt to foster a greater recognition of the ongoing and entangled ebb and flow of agency between humans and the environment.  

Speakers
PD

Peter D'Agostino

Peter d’Agostino’s pioneering photography, video and interactive projects have been exhibited internationally. Surveys of his work include: Interactivity and Intervention, 1978-99, Lehman College Art Gallery, New York; the World-Wide-Walks projects at the University Art Gallery, Bilbao, Spain (2012); and the University of Paris I Partheon-Sorbonne (2003). Major group exhibitions include: The Whitney Museum of American Art (Biennial... Read More →
YH

Yolande Harris

Yolande Harris is an artist engaged with sound, its image and its role in relating humans and their technologies to the environment. Her artistic projects take the form of audio-visual installations and performances, instruments, walks, performative lectures and writings. Her work is presented internationally in the context of visual art exhibitions, music venues and media art festivals and conferences, including MACBA Barcelona, Schirn... Read More →

Artists
SH

Shannon Harris

Shannon Harris is an artist whose film and video work reflect a creative practice that draws from the particulars and subjectivities of personal experience and landscape. The ways in which documentary and experimental film/video practices intersect, and the potential of expanded notions of documentary are areas of interest to her. Shannon’s work has been screened in North America, New Zealand and the EU. She attended Simon Fraser University... Read More →
TC

Teresa Connors

Teresa Connors is active in many aspects of music practice, being an acoustic/electroacoustic composer, opera singer, film scorer, and multimedia installation artist. She collaborates with many artists from diverse backgrounds and with different sensibilities. Originally from Newfoundland, Canada, Teresa holds a Master of Music degree in composition (1st class honours) from Waikato University in New Zealand and studied both composition and... Read More →


Tuesday March 24, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Digital Culture Gallery 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Water Imbalance

The exhibit is open 8:00 am to 10:00 pm, March 22-29.  

Water Imbalance
is a curated exhibition planned for the Balance-Unbalance 2015 conference at the Arizona State University Tempe Campus.

Featuring the work of:
Kim Abeles
Sukey Bryan
Betsy Damon
Danielle Eubank
J.J. L’Heureux
Sandra Mueller
Melissa Reischman
Eco Art Collective


Curated by Sandra Mueller and Danielle Eubank

As the majority of the world’s population, it is incumbent upon women to be guardians of the future. We need to look after our people, our natural environment, and our water. Water is a shared resource amongst all people. It is our provider – for sustenance, fishing, farming and regulation of the earth’s climate. This is an exhibition that makes a statement about the unifying preciousness of water by documenting it all over the world with paintings, photography, mixed media, and installations by leading environmental women artists. 

The conceptual theme of the exhibition addresses the consequences of the human footprint globally by looking at the imbalance of the availability and cleanliness of water. We have specifically examined water scarcity, cleanliness, access, expanding deserts, urban engagement, climate change and diminishing glaciers that all reflect an unworkable imbalance. Artists included a written statement addressing water imbalance. For the visual theme, emphasis is on the view of water from a geographical perspective as well as a state of mind.  – Danielle Eubank, March 2015

Sandra Mueller
Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds. Her colorful abstract paintings and photographs have been shown broadly throughout the Pacific Rim region.

Danielle Eubank
Danielle Eubank is a painter interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. Danielle Eubank is an expedition artist in pursuit of painting all of the major bodies of water in the world. She is beginning by painting all of Earth’s oceans. She sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship, The Antigua, on an expedition to the High Arctic in Autumn 2014. She was an Expedition Artist on the Phoenicia, a replica 600 B.C. Phoenician vessel that circumnavigated Africa and was the Expedition Artist on the Borobudur Ship, a replica of an 8th century Indonesian boat that sailed around the African continent.  


Artists
BD

Betsy Damon

Betsy Damon is an eco-activist artist who works with water, site-specific sculpture, urban design and community. In 1998, Betsy created the Living Water Garden in Sichuan, China, a six-acre urban park that has become an icon for natural water-cleaning systems. She has worked on design teams, notably contributing the wetland system in the Beijing Olympic Park. In the US, Betsy has worked with communities, bringing together arts... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Eubank

Danielle Eubank

University of La Verne
Danielle Eubank is a painter and curator interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. She is painting all of the major bodies of water on the planet, starting with the oceans. In addition to her studio practice, Ms. Eubank is an expedition artist. She sailed aboard the tall ship, The Antigua, on an art and science expedition to the High Arctic in... Read More →
EC

Eco-Art Collective

The Eco-Art Collective is an activist group of the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art dedicated to sustainable stewardship of the environment. Participating Artists: Carolyn Applegate, Amy Bauer, Marie Cenkner, Danielle Eubank, Katherine Kean, Nancy Lissaman, Marion Melchiorre, Sandra Mueller, Annemarie Rawlinson, Seda Saar, Louise Wannier, Frances White.
KA

Kim Abeles

Kim Abeles' installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Among her many honors, Abeles has been recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation, Pollack-Krasner Foundation, and the California Arts Council. She is a 2014 Lucas Visual... Read More →
MR

Melissa Reischman

Melissa Reischman was born in Portland, Oregon. She studied graphic design at the Colorado Institute of Art and went on to build a career as an award-winning graphic designer. During this time she followed the urge to develop her own artistic vision through paintings and drawings, studying with Richard Bunkhall and Ray Turner at Art Center College of Design. Reischman’s work explores movement of light, color and atmosphere. Her paintings... Read More →
SM

Sandra Mueller

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds... Read More →
SB

Sukey Bryan

Sukey Bryan was born in New Jersey in 1961, and grew up in Connecticut and France. She graduated in 1983 from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Fine Arts and English. She worked for five years as a graphic designer in New York with Vignelli Associates, followed by three years of freelance work in San Francisco. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1990. Bryan received grants from... Read More →


Tuesday March 24, 2015 8:00am - 10:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Art Exhibit: Old Graduate Sculpture Studio
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm, March 22-29. 

Fecundity
Bob Vanderbob

Fecundity: 1. the ability to cause or assist healthy growth; 2. the ability to produce offspring; 3. the creative power of the mind or imagination

Will the fecundity of our minds come to the rescue of biological fecundity? Will we collapse and go extinct, or adapt, survive and thrive? It is a delicate balance.

On one hand, the natural systems that sustain human activity are stretched to their limit. Biodiversity is dwindling. We humans are increasingly prey to fertility problems, due to the accumulation of pollution in our bodies. On the other, our understanding of biosystems is exploding. We are decoding nature’s fundamental processes at an accelerating pace with the help of the exponential rise in computing power. 

Whereas our ancestors conjured up potent fertility deities associated with pregnancy, birth, life, rainfall, harvest, love, sex and beauty, the dry and abstract vocabulary we use today in relation to fecundity is not exactly rousing: 'the environment', 'sustainability', 'biodiversity'...

With this installation, Bobvan proposes a mythological, poetic experience, a revitalization of the age-old archetype encompassing the nested metaphorical meanings of the notion of fecundity to include the agility of the mind and the potential of the imagination. 

The installation is inspired by a Neolithic fecundity figure found in Harappa, in the Indus Valley.

A 3D-printed female figure in unsmoothed low-poly, a metaphor for the human species as an ongoing work in progress, is balanced on her head. She becomes a screen onto which are projected images of life, energy, water, bacteria, sperm and ovules, electronic patterns, genetic and binary code. The modern-day 'power' icon is projected onto her skull, reminiscent of Neolithic representations of the vulva, a universal fecundity symbol. In stark contrast, images of desert landscapes in video negative and of Venus, Earth's barren sister planet, are projected onto the back wall. The whole installation is enshrined in a large mirror box, evoking the ongoingness of the universe-as-process by reflecting the fecundity figure ad infinitum in all directions. 

Fecundity is part of Bobvan's Artificial Mythology project; it is presented at Balance-Unbalance as a world premiere. 

ArtLAB Mobile ECO-STUDIO

Mobile Eco Studio is a social art project involving artist-led workshops, planting indigenous species in unused bits of land. It integrates indigenous culture, biology, and community engagement, and adds a unique approach to the related subjects of climate and culture. Its special relationship to the climate and culture of Arizona will help visitors at the conference become more familiar with this unique place and ecosystem.

Words for Water
Tracey Benson

Words for Water explores a diversity of languages, including Indigenous Australian languages, as a starting point to evoke a connection to water as the sustaining element of all life. Indigenous cultures have an acute understanding of and connection to the relationship between body, environment (site) and identity, and this project seeks to awaken this connection more broadly across cultures and practices.

Words for Water is an exploration into the many aspects of the chemical of H2O. Water makes up over 70 percent of the human body; it is essential for sustaining life and has massive social and cultural significance.

Water may seem ubiquitous, but it has some rather uncommon properties. At the atomic level, water can influence how life and landscapes are formed, such as how water moves through a plant and how rivers meander around bends. It is also the only chemical that be formed in three states – vapour, liquid and solid.

This project uses a range of mixed reality media approaches – the use of augmented media to ‘trigger’ sound and video, the development of a smart phone/tablet app, gallery and installation based exhibitions, and a projection work that bring this project together in a filmic, linear narrative.

Words for Water is seen as an ever-expanding project, allowing for infinite expansion of words, thoughts and stories related to water. The project has appeared at SCANZ2015, New Plymouth, New Zealand; Photoacess, October 2014; 3WDS14, Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium, March 2014; and Stage One of Words for Water was presented as part of the Transreal Topologies exhibition at the Royal Institute of Science in Adelaide, October 2013, held in conjunction with the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR).


Speakers
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →

Artists
BV

Bob Vanderbob

Bob Vanderbob, a.k.a. Bobvan, is an artist and composer based in Brussels (Belgium). He explores the interaction between art, mythology, science, and science-fiction to convey his poetic vision of the techno-human condition. He calls his project Artificial Mythology, a matrix of mythological modules, a modern myth-scape for the current context of technological acceleration.
DA

Desert ArtLAB

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary initiative dedicated to a public art practice exploring connections between ecology, technology, and community. Through multimedia performance, food practice, and visual and social art, desert ArtLAB seeks to inform a discourse of desert urban landscapes, while challenging residents to consider how native ecology can inform identity, equality and resilience in our desert culture and... Read More →
TB

Tracey Benson

Tracey Benson is a green geek/artist/researcher into connected communities, UX, WCAG, Gov.2.0, sustainability, tech/art synergies, maps and FOSS. Tracey has been active in a number of media arts communities: in 2007, she co-founded the Canberra chapter of dorkbot with Alexandra Gillespie and was also a moderator on the internationally renowned new media list –empyre- from 2005-07. She has participated in many international digital media... Read More →


Tuesday March 24, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Old Graduate Sculpture Studio 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Balance-Unbalance 2015: EcoQuantum 2.0
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm March 22-29.

Robotanic Mobile Gardens--Soybots III
Shannon McMullen & Fabian Winkler

Climate, energy, agriculture, politics: the project Robotanic Mobile Gardens – SoyBots III belongs to a series of art installations and discursive interventions, collectively focused on critical gardening strategies which demonstrate just how deeply entangled these conditions are. In the global context, soybean production is at the heart of both climate change problems and suggested solutions to food security issues. Thus, soybean plants are mobilized for their significance to global food production, their strong association with a hybridity between nature and technology —in this case as a result of biotechnological strategies for increasing crop yields through genetic modification—and vulnerability to changing climate and water conditions as a result of global warming. 

Gardens express ideas and social relations; some are sites where art and technology produce material realities, social narratives and visualize politics. In this case, mobile gardens unite code, robotics and soybean plants (robotanics) to create a speculative interactive installation that suggests questions about climate, place and agriculture implicated in contemporary practices and values. As self-pollinating organisms in combination with a light-seeking mobile robotic platform, temperature and moisture sensors, soybean plants metaphorically address the evolving interdependence between humans and cultivated crops and the underlying political nature of photosynthesis. 

These relationships are expressed through three autonomous robotic platforms, outfitted with custom planter boxes containing soybean plants, that roam interior space in search of optimal light conditions and ideal temperatures while monitoring soil moisture to promote plant growth in local conditions. To identify optimal light conditions, the robot host employs a phototropic control strategy, using sensors to track and follow sunlight intensity or to locate LED grow lights. Moisture sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller trigger a flashing yellow light when moisture levels are too low, prompting humans to attend to the plants. Finally, temperature sensors are similarly used to allow the soybeans to indicate their need for increased or decreased warmth. ‘Shivering’ indicates a need for higher temperatures. In contrast, the robot will seek dimmer locations when it is too warm. With SoyBots III, soybeans become an ‘evocative object’ (Turkle, 2011) – something that can provoke reflection, speculation and attract emotion.  

Artists
FW

Fabian Winkler

Fabian Winkler is an artist working at the intersections of the moving image, sound, spatial structures and robotics. He explores the aesthetic potential and the cultural implications of seemingly well-known artifacts through the use of new technologies. Conceptually, his works are often influenced by archeological research into the history of technology and observations of social processes. Winkler is currently an Associate Professor of Visual... Read More →
SM

Shannon McMullen

Shannon McMullen is a jointly appointed Assistant Professor in the Electronic and Time-Based Art Program in the School of Visual and Performing Arts and in American Studies at Purdue University. She received a PhD in sociology from the University of California, San Diego, in 2007. Based on her fieldwork experience and dissertation writing in the areas of visual and material culture, Dr. McMullen has developed a creative practice that... Read More →


Tuesday March 24, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Grant Street Atrium 605 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

7:00pm

Night Gallery
The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 


Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution governance in Southern Louisiana. The work revisits the contact between the oil indu…


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
RC

Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Tuesday March 24, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281
 
Wednesday, March 25
 

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Water Imbalance

The exhibit is open 8:00 am to 10:00 pm, March 22-29.  

Water Imbalance
is a curated exhibition planned for the Balance-Unbalance 2015 conference at the Arizona State University Tempe Campus.

Featuring the work of:
Kim Abeles
Sukey Bryan
Betsy Damon
Danielle Eubank
J.J. L’Heureux
Sandra Mueller
Melissa Reischman
Eco Art Collective


Curated by Sandra Mueller and Danielle Eubank

As the majority of the world’s population, it is incumbent upon women to be guardians of the future. We need to look after our people, our natural environment, and our water. Water is a shared resource amongst all people. It is our provider – for sustenance, fishing, farming and regulation of the earth’s climate. This is an exhibition that makes a statement about the unifying preciousness of water by documenting it all over the world with paintings, photography, mixed media, and installations by leading environmental women artists. 

The conceptual theme of the exhibition addresses the consequences of the human footprint globally by looking at the imbalance of the availability and cleanliness of water. We have specifically examined water scarcity, cleanliness, access, expanding deserts, urban engagement, climate change and diminishing glaciers that all reflect an unworkable imbalance. Artists included a written statement addressing water imbalance. For the visual theme, emphasis is on the view of water from a geographical perspective as well as a state of mind.  – Danielle Eubank, March 2015

Sandra Mueller
Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds. Her colorful abstract paintings and photographs have been shown broadly throughout the Pacific Rim region.

Danielle Eubank
Danielle Eubank is a painter interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. Danielle Eubank is an expedition artist in pursuit of painting all of the major bodies of water in the world. She is beginning by painting all of Earth’s oceans. She sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship, The Antigua, on an expedition to the High Arctic in Autumn 2014. She was an Expedition Artist on the Phoenicia, a replica 600 B.C. Phoenician vessel that circumnavigated Africa and was the Expedition Artist on the Borobudur Ship, a replica of an 8th century Indonesian boat that sailed around the African continent.  


Artists
BD

Betsy Damon

Betsy Damon is an eco-activist artist who works with water, site-specific sculpture, urban design and community. In 1998, Betsy created the Living Water Garden in Sichuan, China, a six-acre urban park that has become an icon for natural water-cleaning systems. She has worked on design teams, notably contributing the wetland system in the Beijing Olympic Park. In the US, Betsy has worked with communities, bringing together arts... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Eubank

Danielle Eubank

University of La Verne
Danielle Eubank is a painter and curator interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. She is painting all of the major bodies of water on the planet, starting with the oceans. In addition to her studio practice, Ms. Eubank is an expedition artist. She sailed aboard the tall ship, The Antigua, on an art and science expedition to the High Arctic in... Read More →
EC

Eco-Art Collective

The Eco-Art Collective is an activist group of the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art dedicated to sustainable stewardship of the environment. Participating Artists: Carolyn Applegate, Amy Bauer, Marie Cenkner, Danielle Eubank, Katherine Kean, Nancy Lissaman, Marion Melchiorre, Sandra Mueller, Annemarie Rawlinson, Seda Saar, Louise Wannier, Frances White.
KA

Kim Abeles

Kim Abeles' installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Among her many honors, Abeles has been recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation, Pollack-Krasner Foundation, and the California Arts Council. She is a 2014 Lucas Visual... Read More →
MR

Melissa Reischman

Melissa Reischman was born in Portland, Oregon. She studied graphic design at the Colorado Institute of Art and went on to build a career as an award-winning graphic designer. During this time she followed the urge to develop her own artistic vision through paintings and drawings, studying with Richard Bunkhall and Ray Turner at Art Center College of Design. Reischman’s work explores movement of light, color and atmosphere. Her paintings... Read More →
SM

Sandra Mueller

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds... Read More →
SB

Sukey Bryan

Sukey Bryan was born in New Jersey in 1961, and grew up in Connecticut and France. She graduated in 1983 from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Fine Arts and English. She worked for five years as a graphic designer in New York with Vignelli Associates, followed by three years of freelance work in San Francisco. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1990. Bryan received grants from... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 8:00am - 10:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Workshop: Rekindlers of Hope
Limited Capacity seats available

Using water to spark opportunities from the debris of ecocide.

As part of the Balance/Unbalance 2015 Conference, Latorica Studio presents a 2-day transdisciplinary quest, a re-imagining of our environmental crises as opportunities for transformation toward earth-centred paradigms.

A TRANSDISCIPLINARY STARTING POINT

“Indeed, there are two possible attitudes towards the severe Poly-crisis of the present, 1…]: either we chose to remain prisoners inside the ‘double-binds’ of the simple binary thinking, the comfortable inertia that can lead to self-destruction, or we dare to convert the crisis into an opportunity to go beyond the frustrating contradictions and double-binds and to discover the marvellous complexity of our Reality.” (Morin quoted in Dincᾰ)

WORKSHOP BRIEF

This workshop engages complexity, ruptures the linear and rational, and reaches into the unknown. As a group, we’ll aim to map out a blueprint for re-enchantment: we’ll be focusing specifically on `governance'; how do we re-enchant governing bodies/systems/structures toward an earth-centred paradigm which holds fluid respect for the Other. This is about discovering “the marvellous complexity of our Reality” (ibid.).

HOW & WHY

Practically, the workshop will employ several creative exercises, walking and dialogue sessions. Guided by transdisciplinary thinking, we’ll immerse ourselves in a 2-day mythological quest, using water as our central metaphor — the elixir of life. The aim of the workshop is to produce a piece that can be presented to governing bodies (such as the United Nations, National or State Environmental Departments, Companies and Communities), as a blueprint for working on the ground with complexity and in respect of the Other.

“In the long way towards yourself, you should rather explore the Other with the infinite of [their] being.”
(Nicolescu quoted in Dincᾰ.).
 

A LITTLE MORE DETAIL

Inspired by one of the main goals of transdisciplinarity, ‘an awakening of consciousness’, this workshop will be a creative-knowledge-outcome-based investigation into the opportunity for water to be our re-enchantment. It is possible that the future of human potential will be determined most explicitly, by how (well) we relate with water: culturally (politically), biologically, and spiritually.

The 2-day workshop brings together a maximum of 12 participants, ideally with diverse/different ‘knowledge’, who will work collectively to produce a ‘poetic’ piece exemplifying the transdisciplinary vision toward the ‘unity of human knowledge’. The workshop itself will be practice-led, incorporating creative, walking and dialogue sessions, which are grounded in the transdisciplinary principles of rigour, open-mindedness and tolerance. The final materiality and content of the poetic piece will be determined by the intersections of participants and workshop practices. However, the piece will be framed within the ‘Charter of Transdisciplinarity’ and have the specific objective of re-imagining our global environmental crisis as an opportunity for transformation toward an earth-centred paradigm (whether manifested as interior or exterior realities).

Requirements: Participants are not required to possess specific experience or skills, but will need openness, alacrity, and be eager for the challenge of a 2-day quest. After registering, participants will be sent three readings to consider and asked to find one object, prior to the workshop.

www.latorica.net

FEE 
$50 covers both days, including lunch and refreshments. Places limited to 12 participants — early registration recommended. 


Speakers
IB

Ilka Blue Nelson

My name is Ilka Blue Nelson. I do not belong to a watershed but come from generations of wanderers. As a Creative Ecologist I work at the intersections of cultural 8c biological diversity, particularly favoring river locales. My work is typical of an ecologist in that I am concerned with ecosystems as a whole, and work at restoring relationships within and between systems. My new studio, Latorica (www.latorica.net), seeks methods for... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 9:00am - 3:00pm
ASU Art Museum Ceramics Research Center at the Brickyard 699 South Mill Ave, Suite 108.

9:00am

Workshop: The Way Forward: Balloon-Enabled RedCross Workshop
THE WAY FORWARD: BALLOON-ENABLED REDCROSS WORKSHOP

As part of the conference, keynote speaker Pablo Suarez, Associate Director of the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre, presents The Way Forward, a quest to collectively construct a large solar hot air balloon made of plastic bags that would otherwise be trash.

THE WAY FORWARD: Balloon-Enabled RedCross Workshop

Co-creating wonder-producing artwork from a pernicious source of waste – the plastic bag – produces a powerful experience for all communities threatened by a changing climate. It attracts viewers and offers a means to re-imagine the world and its possibilities. The proposed crowd-made solar hot air balloon can be used as part of participatory processes to explore climate change science, adaptation, and mitigation. A flying solar balloon can promote resilience in any local context, offering local media a simple story for reporting community efforts in understanding and addressing climate change.

ASU alumni and artist Bobby Zokaites will lead a drop-in workshop on March 25 and 26 at Arizona State University. The workshop participants will actively construct this 30-foot hot air balloon, so come for a day or just an hour to help realize this project! 

Contact Bobby 


Speakers
BZ

Bobby Zokaites

Bobby Zokaites is an Arizona-based artist engaging his imagination through the creation of large-scale, colorful, and interactive spaces and objects. Enthusiastic about the idea of ‘play’, his work investigates themes of adventure and childhood while utilizing construction and assembly methods inspired by industrial processes. Approaching opportunities with big vision, the work is physically ambitious, conceptually dynamic, and... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

10:00am

Workshop: Future-Energy: Research and Design Storm
FUTURE-ENERGY: RESEARCH AND DESIGN STORM

Future-Energy: Research and Design Storm is a 2-day workshop.

What: To investigate pressing energy issues facing the Phoenix area and the US Southwest, and to use research and design thinking to generate ideas for potential sustainable solutions. This workshop is designed for interested conference participants and an interdisciplinary group of college students from ASU and the University of New Mexico.

Who: The workshop will be facilitated by Megan Halpern (ASU), Dan Collins (ASU) and Andrea Polli (The University of New Mexico) with students from ASU and The University of New Mexico

Day 1
Research: Participants take on the role of “energy investigators” with the goal of building a visual “energy ethnography” for Phoenix and the Valley. In the morning session, interdisciplinary teams are formed (participants remain in these teams for the rest of the workshop), and sent on a visual and other-data-gathering scavenger hunt. Using smartphones, teams walk through parts of downtown Phoenix, taking photographs, gathering data and making brief observations, which they share over Twitter and other databases. Tweets relating to the workshop will include #BunB2015, and participants will be given a list of predetermined hashtags such as #waste, #surplus, or #scarcity, and “collect” images and observations with these tags. This exercise is designed to help participants build their observational skills related to ethnography and visual ethnography, and to help the larger group to build a catalog that can be used as inspiration during the rest of the workshop. During the scavenger hunt process, groups will also be able to observe and work with student technicians and organizers to use a Leica LIDAR system to rapidly capture sections of the downtown area as 3D point clouds. These images will be among the images tweeted with the hashtag #BunB2015, and may also include thematic hashtags from the hunt. At the end of the day, teams share their results with the larger group of participants.

Day 2
In the morning, participants choose a topic area or problem with which to engage, and begin their design projects. Design Storm: Teams will undergo a series of three structured creative design-storming exercises (or design ‘sprints’) that incorporate the catalog of materials gathered during the scavenger hunt. After each of the three activities, participants will briefly share their progress. During the afternoon session, groups will work independently to complete a proposal or prototype for a solution to their energy-related issue. Finally, the workshop will reconvene for reporting from each group on their project results.

After the workshop, the results of Future-Energy: Research and Design Storm are presented by participants in a poster-style session at the Balance/Unbalance conference.

Registration Link coming soon

Participating Courses:
ASU Visualization and Prototyping
UNM Computational Sustainability


Speakers
DC

Dan Collins

Dan Collins joined the School of Art faculty at Arizona State University in 1989. He is founding Co-Director of the PRISM lab (a 3D modeling and prototyping facility) and coordinator of the foundation art program (artCore). Collins studied studio art and art history at the University of California, Davis, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974. He holds a Master of Arts degree in Art Education from Stanford University (1975), a Master of... Read More →
MH

Megan Halpern

Megan Halpern is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, where she works with the Center for Science and the Imagination on “Emerge: Artists + Scientists Redesign the Future.” She earned her PhD in Science Communication at Cornell University. Her doctoral work focused on artist/scientist collaboration and the relationships between experts and publics, and... Read More →
AP

Andrea Polli

Andrea Polli is currently an Associate Professor of Art and Ecology with appointments in the College of Fine Arts and School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico.  She holds the Mesa Del Sol Endowed Chair of Digital Media and directs the Social Media Workgroup, a lab at the University's Center for Advanced Research Computing. She served as the founding Director of the Interdisciplinary Film and Digital Media Program and as... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 10:00am - 6:00pm
Grant Street Studios 605 E Grant St., Phoenix, AZ

12:00pm

Workshop: Designing Resilient Communities: The Choice to Stay
This workshop will be directed by Gary Lawrence, a Corporate Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer for AECOM Technology Corporation (NYSE: ACM), an $8-billion global provider of professional technical and management support services. AECOM’s 45,000 employees — including architects, engineers, designers, planners, scientists and management professionals — serving clients in more than 130 countries around the world.

Register HERE

Mr. Lawrence leads AECOM’s sustainability efforts by managing AECOM’s extensive resources and skills in sustainability for projects across the enterprise. He is also an AECOM spokesperson and thought leader on sustainability issues. During his 30-year-plus career in public and private policy and management, his leadership skills have contributed to various global initiatives engaging in research and practice to mitigate climate change and adaptation strategies.

His work entails international agreements on ecosystem services, greening the grey and how to bring capital, social interaction and intelligence to bear on mitigating the risks associated with natural disaster.

This workshop is a unique oprtunity to be part of a high level international discourse on climate change and designing resilliance into communities in a changing world. 

Context
Sea levels are rising, temperatures are increasing, water shortages are an increasing risk, and extreme weather events are becoming more common. All of these climate change consequences, framed in the variables of time and degree, have impacts on the health and safety of our societies, ecosystems and the stability of our economies. Can anyone really say that they fully understand the present let alone the future? How, given uncertainty, do we best address risk in a manner that optimizes the value of our investments and maximizes community energy on a coherent path to create a future we would prefer to have? What will need to be true in the future if people are to choose to stay and help communities be resilient and adaptive? What are the things that really matter?

Objective
Develop a new framework for decision making that recognizes city planning is first and foremost a social and political problem – not a design problem.

Introduction
Our citizens have a choice about where they live.

From our perspective as engineers, designers, artists and economists, working with resilient cities around the world there is no doubt that you we have to be thinking about how to redesign so that people can move back off the coast so they’re at less risk. How can any politician build a career on telling people they have to move?

We can design the solutions. We can make a rational argument based on science, fact and current examples – but people do not make decisions based on rationality, they make decisions based on personal beliefs, tribal beliefs, nostalgia, fear and a whole host of other emotional factors. The big question for the design community is:

“When are we going to realize we’re in a political situation and stop believing that better design will be compelling enough to create massive change?”

The world’s most developed societies are failing to respond to the warnings. The choice to act is a political one – and cities are forgetting their social contract.

A survey conducted in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in the United States revealed that if residents of Houston, Texas could be guaranteed the same job with an equitable salary in another city, 60% would choose to leave rather than stay and fight for the future success of their city.

How can a City ensure that the people it nurtures and educates choose to stay and invest in the successful future of their City?

Four Step Process
Clarity about the problem or the opportunity

Around the world there are an increasing number of high value fixes being proposed for the problems of climate change. Building physical resilience in cities often focuses on massive engineering projects, expensive retrofits and additional infrastructure. Building social resilience in cities is less often recognized as the critical issue it is. Too often it is simply discussed in terms of higher costs – higher healthcare costs for ageing people living longer, the pension fund deficit, the shortage of affordable housing.

Objective

  • Understand the difference between solving the attributes of a problem and identifying the fundamental issue.
  • Understand the critical intersections between the spectrum of systems (human, social, natural, economic, physical) upon which cities are built.
Agreement that the problem or the opportunity needs to be addressed

In almost every case, any proposed high budget solution meets with strong public resistance. This is inevitably because investments can only be made in one area of concern at the expense of another.

It can be all too easy for professionals to propose solutions to problems that stakeholders either do not think need addressing or are of lower priority than other issues cared about.  Part of this is the result of not getting the question right.  Part is what is referred to as “the tyranny of experts” where the public is expected to simply defer to the intellectual superiority of others when experience is clear that this is often a path to heartache.  Part is a failure to appreciate and incorporate the wisdom of the masses when they are provided unbiased information that is accessible to them, not just to the experts.  This is not to suggest that majority must rule.  The literature is pretty clear however that if institutions and individuals that the majority trusts and for whom they feel some kinship are not convinced that the problem at hand is a priority then the majority will withhold their permission.

Objective

  • Understand how to engage the “hive mind”.
  • Identify all the stakeholders in the project and understand what their motivations are.
Knowing what can be done and what this might achieve

There can be greater confidence (and influence) in addressing attributes of problems rather than fundamentals. Design can go a long way towards addressing aspects of some problems, but it cannot address the fundamentals.  The fundamentals are political.

Is the money we’re spending today going to be value added given what we can reasonably predict? How are we going to ensure that our investment in the future is actually based upon a strong foundation and an integrated approach to the future of communities? How do we understand the whole range of risks and how do we optimize available resources so that every investment we make helps address risk across the whole spectrum? What is the opportunity cost of not addressing the future?

Objective

Be able to answer the following questions:

  • Have we defined the problem correctly?
  • Can we achieve more than one purpose at a time?
  • Are we organized to realize value added opportunities?
  • Is this just a cost, or is there a return on investment?
Choosing to act differently

Without the choice to act differently, conventional wisdom will dominate and we will make much less progress than would otherwise be possible.  The choice to act differently is a risk management issue – political risk, financial risk, resource management risk.  Good design and good science can help reduce the risk of different choices of course.  More fundamental however are culture, nostalgia, aspiration, fear and what Frances Bacon described as the preference for truths that we would rather believe.

How can we communicate honestly and openly with the public about the levels of confidence we have in the decisions being made, and the limits to their impact?

Objective

  • Understand the sources of conflict that shape our choices towards a more resilient, sustainable future:
    • human centered vs. environment centered
    • faith vs. doubt
    • present vs. future
    • optimism vs. pessimism
    • equality vs. equity
    • security vs. risk
    • self interest vs. public interest
    • direct costs vs. externalities
    • market freedom vs. market constraint
  • Articulate the basis for a public relations campaign that empowers political leaders to make better decisions about investments that allow them to solve fundamental problems across a broad spectrum of interests with fewer resources.
Register HERE - $20 covers both days, including lunch and refreshments. The workshop will occur in GIOS on the ASU Tempe campus and will start with lunch at 12 noon on March 25.  Further information will be forwarded to participants closer to the event.

Speakers
JJ

Jill Jago

Jill Jago is a communications strategist who specializes in connecting audiences with the complex, often abstract, concepts that can create barriers to more sustainable urban design. With over 20 years as a professional marketer in the urban planning, architecture and engineering industry, Jill is recognized for her expertise in developing new approaches and business strategies that make more sustainable outcomes possible. Her experience embraces... Read More →
GL

Gary Lawrence

Gary Lawrence is Corporate Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer for AECOM Technology Corporation (NYSE: ACM), an $8-billion global provider of professional technical and management support services. AECOM’s 45,000 employees — including architects, engineers, designers, planners, scientists and management professionals — serve clients in more than 130 countries around the world. | | Mr. Lawrence leads AECOM’s sustainability... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 12:00pm - 5:00pm
Global Institute of Sustainability, 4th Floor, Rm 481 294 E University Dr, Tempe, AZ 85281

2:00pm

Workshop: Reimagining Resilience: Walking Indigenous Waterways
Limited Capacity seats available

REIMAGINING RESILIENCE: WALKING INDIGENOUS WATERWAYS

Reimagining Resilience is a workshop that utilizes walking as a medium to create a sensory experience that reimagines urban geography. Beneath the Phoenix Metropolitan area exist the remnants of a complex canal system that sustained a desert society for approximately 1,500 years. At its apex, the canal system consisted of over 500 miles of canals supplying over 100,000 acres of farmland with water. Today, this legacy of sustainable desert living is concealed by a postindustrial landscape of asphalt parking lots, roadways, and suburban, residential and commercial developments.

This project intends to recognize and honor the ancient waterways and the indigenous ecologies that thrived in the pre-Columbian southwest of North America. Participants will be led on a walking tour along the paths of ancient Huhugam canals that once traveled through the area where the Arizona State University Campus and the City of Tempe now rest. They will be guided through a tour using their wireless mobile devices, allowing them to imagine and visualize layers of infrastructure and recover lost knowledge.

Workshop participants will collect GPS data, photographs and video, using their mobile handheld devices. Utilizing a collective process, we will brainstorm creative uses of this data, such as explorations of mapping, place-making, way-finding and geocaching interventions in public space. Participants will also construct a series of situations, real and virtual, which will inform a mediated guide that will be available to Balance-Unbalance attendees for the duration of the conference.

The guide will allow the public to visualize the past while considering how ancient master water engineers, the Huhugam, can inform a discussion about building resilient communities in the desert today. This is also a project that will continue beyond the conference. Participants will be asked to contribute to a collaborative photo essay that will be exhibited at a local gallery following the conference. The outcomes of the workshop will also be used to inform the development of future projects involving Huhugam history, technology and culture, such as interactive installations and mobile augmented reality experiences. The long-term goal is to further draw from Oasisamerican culture in order to construct an ecological and historical portrait of this region that combines quantitative and subjective characteristics of past and present ecologies and landscapes. In essence, this project will construct virtual ecologies and landscapes that will inform discussions surrounding resilient practices in response to climate change and ecological disruption.

This will be a 2-day workshop. Each daily workshop will be approximately 5 hours. Below is a tentative schedule:

Day 1: Short lecture on the history of the Huhugam canals and overview of their cultural and ecological practices. Tutorial on GPS, mapping, etc. Preliminary walking tour. Project brainstorming session. The first day will take place at the Pueblo Grande Museum, which has a $4.80 entrance fee.

Day 2: Main walking tour and data collection expedition. Sorting and cataloging of the data. Brainstorming and design of situations, mediated guide, etc.

Method of registration: mattgarcia@ksu.edu


Speakers
AB

April Bojorquez

April Bojorquez has worked in the museum field nationally/internationally as an educator, curator, and researcher. She is influenced by participatory practice, social sculpture, and relational aesthetics. Bojorquez employs diverse strategies to produce immersive and interactive learning environments. Her scholarship exploring museum practice and food practice has lead to the production of numerous exhibits, symposia, and public programs.
CC

Carlos Castellanos

Carlos Castellanos is an interdisciplinary artist and researcher with a wide array of interests such as embodiment, cybernetics, ecology, phenomenology, artificial intelligence and art-science collaboration. He has received a National Science Foundation IGERT Fellowship in Interactive Digital Multimedia and was a California State University Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholar. His artworks have been exhibited at local, national and... Read More →
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 2:00pm - 7:00pm
Pueblo Grande Museum 4619 E Washington St Phoenix, AZ 85034

2:30pm

Workshop: Acoustic Ecology Field Recording
The American Society for Acoustic Ecology presents a hands-on Field Recording Workshop in conjunction with the Balance/Unbalance 2015 Conference.

The goal of the workshop is to offer participants a hands-on experience of soundscape recording in a natural environment, while learning about the field recording practices of master artists, and participating in a conversation and skill-share with the artists and other participants around the techniques and philosophy of field recording. 

The workshop will take place on March 25-26 in Tempe, Arizona.  It will be led by three working artists, each with a significant and unique practice in field recording. The site of the hands-on session is the Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed at sunrise, 90 minutes north and east of Tempe.  More information and example recordings from the site can be found here.

SCHEDULE

Wednesday, March 25:
2:30-3:00pm Arrival and check-in at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (room TBD) 

3:00-6:00pm 
A brief introduction, then a presentation by each of the Lead Artists, followed by a Q & A with all three.

6:00-7:00pm
Dinner break (on your own — local restaurants will be identified)

7:00-9:00pm
Provided transportation to the Days Inn in Camp Verde, AZ.  

Thursday, March 26:
5:00-8:30am 
Field Recording Excursion to the Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed.  (Sunrise occurs at 6:24am)
NOTE: This site is part of the Listen(n) project of ASU.  Recordings made this morning can be submitted to the project for inclusion.
More information about the site can be found HERE.

8:30-10:30am 
Downtime at the Days Inn

10:30-12:30pm
Provided transportation back to Tempe/ASU

12:30-1:30pm: 
Lunch break (on your own — local restaurants will be identified)

1:30-4:00pm: 
An informal post-recording conversation led by the Lead Artists.  Individuals will be encouraged to share their recordings, discuss techniques, and share their skills and ideas with the group.  A sound system will be provided.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
– Registration cutoff for this workshop is March 18, 2015.

– The registration fee includes transportation, but does not include the your stay at the Days Inn in Camp Verde, AZ on the evening of March 25, 2015. Participants will need to book this on their own.  The Days Inn website.

– an email reminder with detailed information on locations, meeting points, and recommended packing list, etc. will be distributed two weeks before the event.

REGISTRATION & PAYMENT

Registration costs are $100 for ASAE members, and $150 for non-members.  The non-member fee includes membership, if desired. There is no partial registration fee available for attending only part of the workshop.Payments can be made via PayPal to: asae.treasurer@gmail.com. Alternate payment arrangements can be made. Please contact ASAE Treasurer Michael Bullock at the same address.

Any other inquiries about the workshop can be made to Stephan Moore.

Speakers
AL

Annea Lockwood

Annea Lockwood is known for her explorations of the rich world of natural acoustic sounds and environments, in works ranging from sound art and installations and performance art to concert music. Her music has been performed in many venues and festivals and extensively recorded. | | She has created several sound maps of famous rivers including the Danube, Hudson, and the Housatonic. See some of the press on her work here. Wild Energy, in... Read More →
JM

Jeremiah Moore

Sound designer, mixer, and sound artist Jeremiah Moore is known for his sensitive and listening-centered approach to sound production. His work has appeared in documentary films Miracle In A Box, Key of G, feature film Cherish, theater productions Merchant of Auschwitz (Denver Drama Critics Circle award for best sound design), permanent museum exhibits Prehistoric Journey at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, the Detention Barracks at the... Read More →
GW

Glenn Weyant

Glenn Weyant is a Tucson-based folk listener and a founding member of the early 21st Century Border Wall Deconstructionist Movement. For two decades Weyant has chronicled the Sonoran Desert soundscape via soundwalks, field recordings and performance. In borderland performances, a keystone of Weyant’s work includes amplifying and playing walls, militarized infrastructure and migrant ephemera with a cello bow and implements of mass... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 2:30pm - 7:00pm
Stauffer B103 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Art Exhibit: Old Graduate Sculpture Studio
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm, March 22-29. 

Fecundity
Bob Vanderbob

Fecundity: 1. the ability to cause or assist healthy growth; 2. the ability to produce offspring; 3. the creative power of the mind or imagination

Will the fecundity of our minds come to the rescue of biological fecundity? Will we collapse and go extinct, or adapt, survive and thrive? It is a delicate balance.

On one hand, the natural systems that sustain human activity are stretched to their limit. Biodiversity is dwindling. We humans are increasingly prey to fertility problems, due to the accumulation of pollution in our bodies. On the other, our understanding of biosystems is exploding. We are decoding nature’s fundamental processes at an accelerating pace with the help of the exponential rise in computing power. 

Whereas our ancestors conjured up potent fertility deities associated with pregnancy, birth, life, rainfall, harvest, love, sex and beauty, the dry and abstract vocabulary we use today in relation to fecundity is not exactly rousing: 'the environment', 'sustainability', 'biodiversity'...

With this installation, Bobvan proposes a mythological, poetic experience, a revitalization of the age-old archetype encompassing the nested metaphorical meanings of the notion of fecundity to include the agility of the mind and the potential of the imagination. 

The installation is inspired by a Neolithic fecundity figure found in Harappa, in the Indus Valley.

A 3D-printed female figure in unsmoothed low-poly, a metaphor for the human species as an ongoing work in progress, is balanced on her head. She becomes a screen onto which are projected images of life, energy, water, bacteria, sperm and ovules, electronic patterns, genetic and binary code. The modern-day 'power' icon is projected onto her skull, reminiscent of Neolithic representations of the vulva, a universal fecundity symbol. In stark contrast, images of desert landscapes in video negative and of Venus, Earth's barren sister planet, are projected onto the back wall. The whole installation is enshrined in a large mirror box, evoking the ongoingness of the universe-as-process by reflecting the fecundity figure ad infinitum in all directions. 

Fecundity is part of Bobvan's Artificial Mythology project; it is presented at Balance-Unbalance as a world premiere. 

ArtLAB Mobile ECO-STUDIO

Mobile Eco Studio is a social art project involving artist-led workshops, planting indigenous species in unused bits of land. It integrates indigenous culture, biology, and community engagement, and adds a unique approach to the related subjects of climate and culture. Its special relationship to the climate and culture of Arizona will help visitors at the conference become more familiar with this unique place and ecosystem.


Speakers
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →

Artists
BV

Bob Vanderbob

Bob Vanderbob, a.k.a. Bobvan, is an artist and composer based in Brussels (Belgium). He explores the interaction between art, mythology, science, and science-fiction to convey his poetic vision of the techno-human condition. He calls his project Artificial Mythology, a matrix of mythological modules, a modern myth-scape for the current context of technological acceleration.
DA

Desert ArtLAB

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary initiative dedicated to a public art practice exploring connections between ecology, technology, and community. Through multimedia performance, food practice, and visual and social art, desert ArtLAB seeks to inform a discourse of desert urban landscapes, while challenging residents to consider how native ecology can inform identity, equality and resilience in our desert culture and... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Old Graduate Sculpture Studio 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Balance-Unbalance 2015: EcoQuantum 2.0
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm March 22-29.

Robotanic Mobile Gardens--Soybots III
Shannon McMullen & Fabian Winkler

Climate, energy, agriculture, politics: the project Robotanic Mobile Gardens – SoyBots III belongs to a series of art installations and discursive interventions, collectively focused on critical gardening strategies which demonstrate just how deeply entangled these conditions are. In the global context, soybean production is at the heart of both climate change problems and suggested solutions to food security issues. Thus, soybean plants are mobilized for their significance to global food production, their strong association with a hybridity between nature and technology —in this case as a result of biotechnological strategies for increasing crop yields through genetic modification—and vulnerability to changing climate and water conditions as a result of global warming. 

Gardens express ideas and social relations; some are sites where art and technology produce material realities, social narratives and visualize politics. In this case, mobile gardens unite code, robotics and soybean plants (robotanics) to create a speculative interactive installation that suggests questions about climate, place and agriculture implicated in contemporary practices and values. As self-pollinating organisms in combination with a light-seeking mobile robotic platform, temperature and moisture sensors, soybean plants metaphorically address the evolving interdependence between humans and cultivated crops and the underlying political nature of photosynthesis. 

These relationships are expressed through three autonomous robotic platforms, outfitted with custom planter boxes containing soybean plants, that roam interior space in search of optimal light conditions and ideal temperatures while monitoring soil moisture to promote plant growth in local conditions. To identify optimal light conditions, the robot host employs a phototropic control strategy, using sensors to track and follow sunlight intensity or to locate LED grow lights. Moisture sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller trigger a flashing yellow light when moisture levels are too low, prompting humans to attend to the plants. Finally, temperature sensors are similarly used to allow the soybeans to indicate their need for increased or decreased warmth. ‘Shivering’ indicates a need for higher temperatures. In contrast, the robot will seek dimmer locations when it is too warm. With SoyBots III, soybeans become an ‘evocative object’ (Turkle, 2011) – something that can provoke reflection, speculation and attract emotion.  

Words for Water
Tracey Benson

Words for Water explores a diversity of languages, including Indigenous Australian languages, as a starting point to evoke a connection to water as the sustaining element of all life. Indigenous cultures have an acute understanding of and connection to the relationship between body, environment (site) and identity, and this project seeks to awaken this connection more broadly across cultures and practices.

Words for Water is an exploration into the many aspects of the chemical of H2O. Water makes up over 70 percent of the human body; it is essential for sustaining life and has massive social and cultural significance.

Water may seem ubiquitous, but it has some rather uncommon properties. At the atomic level, water can influence how life and landscapes are formed, such as how water moves through a plant and how rivers meander around bends. It is also the only chemical that be formed in three states – vapour, liquid and solid.

This project uses a range of mixed reality media approaches – the use of augmented media to ‘trigger’ sound and video, the development of a smart phone/tablet app, gallery and installation based exhibitions, and a projection work that bring this project together in a filmic, linear narrative.

Words for Water is seen as an ever-expanding project, allowing for infinite expansion of words, thoughts and stories related to water. The project has appeared at SCANZ2015, New Plymouth, New Zealand; Photoacess, October 2014; 3WDS14, Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium, March 2014; and Stage One of Words for Water was presented as part of the Transreal Topologies exhibition at the Royal Institute of Science in Adelaide, October 2013, held in conjunction with the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR).


Artists
FW

Fabian Winkler

Fabian Winkler is an artist working at the intersections of the moving image, sound, spatial structures and robotics. He explores the aesthetic potential and the cultural implications of seemingly well-known artifacts through the use of new technologies. Conceptually, his works are often influenced by archeological research into the history of technology and observations of social processes. Winkler is currently an Associate Professor of Visual... Read More →
SM

Shannon McMullen

Shannon McMullen is a jointly appointed Assistant Professor in the Electronic and Time-Based Art Program in the School of Visual and Performing Arts and in American Studies at Purdue University. She received a PhD in sociology from the University of California, San Diego, in 2007. Based on her fieldwork experience and dissertation writing in the areas of visual and material culture, Dr. McMullen has developed a creative practice that... Read More →
TB

Tracey Benson

Tracey Benson is a green geek/artist/researcher into connected communities, UX, WCAG, Gov.2.0, sustainability, tech/art synergies, maps and FOSS. Tracey has been active in a number of media arts communities: in 2007, she co-founded the Canberra chapter of dorkbot with Alexandra Gillespie and was also a moderator on the internationally renowned new media list –empyre- from 2005-07. She has participated in many international digital media... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Grant Street Atrium 605 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

7:00pm

Night Gallery
The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 

Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution governance in Southern Louisiana. The work revisits the contact between the oil indu…


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
RC

Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Wednesday March 25, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281
 
Thursday, March 26
 

7:00am

Watch Sunrise at James Turrell Skyspace: Air Apparent
Thursday March 26, 2015 7:00am - 9:00am
James Turrell Skyspace: Air Apparent ASU, Tempe, west side of Rural Road at Terrace Road in Tempe

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Water Imbalance

The exhibit is open 8:00 am to 10:00 pm, March 22-29.  

Water Imbalance
is a curated exhibition planned for the Balance-Unbalance 2015 conference at the Arizona State University Tempe Campus.

Featuring the work of:
Kim Abeles
Sukey Bryan
Betsy Damon
Danielle Eubank
J.J. L’Heureux
Sandra Mueller
Melissa Reischman
Eco Art Collective


Curated by Sandra Mueller and Danielle Eubank

As the majority of the world’s population, it is incumbent upon women to be guardians of the future. We need to look after our people, our natural environment, and our water. Water is a shared resource amongst all people. It is our provider – for sustenance, fishing, farming and regulation of the earth’s climate. This is an exhibition that makes a statement about the unifying preciousness of water by documenting it all over the world with paintings, photography, mixed media, and installations by leading environmental women artists. 

The conceptual theme of the exhibition addresses the consequences of the human footprint globally by looking at the imbalance of the availability and cleanliness of water. We have specifically examined water scarcity, cleanliness, access, expanding deserts, urban engagement, climate change and diminishing glaciers that all reflect an unworkable imbalance. Artists included a written statement addressing water imbalance. For the visual theme, emphasis is on the view of water from a geographical perspective as well as a state of mind.  – Danielle Eubank, March 2015

Sandra Mueller
Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds. Her colorful abstract paintings and photographs have been shown broadly throughout the Pacific Rim region.

Danielle Eubank
Danielle Eubank is a painter interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. Danielle Eubank is an expedition artist in pursuit of painting all of the major bodies of water in the world. She is beginning by painting all of Earth’s oceans. She sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship, The Antigua, on an expedition to the High Arctic in Autumn 2014. She was an Expedition Artist on the Phoenicia, a replica 600 B.C. Phoenician vessel that circumnavigated Africa and was the Expedition Artist on the Borobudur Ship, a replica of an 8th century Indonesian boat that sailed around the African continent.  

Waste Water
Kristian Derek Ball

As unavoidable as it is, water is something that we as humans have to waste to some degree. But we still have options on how we approach, view and interact with our water-related activities.

The idea behind this new installation is to raise a hyper-awareness of the process of water draining away from us during its usage. The sonic experience of listening to the phenomenon of water in action and its interfacing with those using it, can lead us into this mode of listening which may juxtapose traditional symbolic references. 

The Human Delta
Rachel Mayeri

A delta is a place where a river meets another body of water. A river carries sediment that leaves a triangular pattern where the two bodies of water intersperse. Human bodies are nutrient-rich water and sediment transportation systems. The Human Delta occurs at the toilet, an effluence of millions of gallons of sediment-rich water, which mixes with rivers, aquifers, bays, land, and the ocean.

Environmentalists are dealing with the human delta as toxic concentrations of bacteria, pharmaceuticals, and other chemicals in partially treated wastewater routinely pollute waterways. Some chemicals which course through human bodies--heart medicine, antibiotics, estrogen--may adversely affect fish populations and their habitats. Yet, the chemicals which are naturally produced in urine--nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium--rather than be construed as waste or pollution, can be used as important nutrients for the soil in which plants grow. Agrobusiness uses fertilizers derived from fossil fuels and mined from limited reserves, contributing to global warming. A more sustainable solution would be to recycle human urine, treat it, and use it as fertilizer, linking the Human Delta back to the ecological cycle productively, rather than destructively.

The Human Delta is an art-science project intended to increase public awareness about the human "waste" at its point of departure: the bathroom. A series of posters are installed in conference bathrooms, and are available for distribution. Toilets are interstitial, potentially contemplative spaces, which underscore the hidden, segregated, white-tiled, and taboo nature of the subject.

One poster is about the flow of pharmaceuticals from human bodies into a river delta. Informed by scientific research which has found concentrations of caffeine in the Puget Sound, the poster depicts the Starbucks logo as a flow of caffeine, hormones, antibiotics, and medicines entering and leaving the human body, and cycling back as disturbed (caffeinated, aggressive, effeminate) fish. Another poster is about the potential of urine as a fertilizer. It depicts a farmer fountain: a stream of water pours forth from kidneys and bladder, fertilizing a field of corn. Text on the poster reads: "urine is fertilizer" / "nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium." 


Artists
BD

Betsy Damon

Betsy Damon is an eco-activist artist who works with water, site-specific sculpture, urban design and community. In 1998, Betsy created the Living Water Garden in Sichuan, China, a six-acre urban park that has become an icon for natural water-cleaning systems. She has worked on design teams, notably contributing the wetland system in the Beijing Olympic Park. In the US, Betsy has worked with communities, bringing together arts... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Eubank

Danielle Eubank

University of La Verne
Danielle Eubank is a painter and curator interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. She is painting all of the major bodies of water on the planet, starting with the oceans. In addition to her studio practice, Ms. Eubank is an expedition artist. She sailed aboard the tall ship, The Antigua, on an art and science expedition to the High Arctic in... Read More →
EC

Eco-Art Collective

The Eco-Art Collective is an activist group of the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art dedicated to sustainable stewardship of the environment. Participating Artists: Carolyn Applegate, Amy Bauer, Marie Cenkner, Danielle Eubank, Katherine Kean, Nancy Lissaman, Marion Melchiorre, Sandra Mueller, Annemarie Rawlinson, Seda Saar, Louise Wannier, Frances White.
KA

Kim Abeles

Kim Abeles' installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Among her many honors, Abeles has been recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation, Pollack-Krasner Foundation, and the California Arts Council. She is a 2014 Lucas Visual... Read More →
KD

Kristian Derek Ball

Kristian Derek Ball has designed sound and written music for theatrical and film companies both nationally and internationally, as well as recorded and produced music for various artists and musicians worldwide. He has designed sound for regional and local companies such as Metropolitan Theatre Ensemble in Kansas City, The Children’s Theatre Company in Minneapolis, and Allentown Public Theatre among others, and has spent the last 5 years... Read More →
MR

Melissa Reischman

Melissa Reischman was born in Portland, Oregon. She studied graphic design at the Colorado Institute of Art and went on to build a career as an award-winning graphic designer. During this time she followed the urge to develop her own artistic vision through paintings and drawings, studying with Richard Bunkhall and Ray Turner at Art Center College of Design. Reischman’s work explores movement of light, color and atmosphere. Her paintings... Read More →
RM

Rachel Mayeri

Rachel Mayeri is a Los Angeles-based media artist working at the intersection of science and art. Her projects explore topics ranging from the history of special effects to the human animal. Her videos and installations have shown at Sundance, Berlinale, Documenta 13, Ars Electronica, The Getty Museum, and MoMA PS1. She is the recipient of numerous grants, including the Wellcome Trust, Creative Capital, and the California Council for the... Read More →
SM

Sandra Mueller

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds... Read More →
SB

Sukey Bryan

Sukey Bryan was born in New Jersey in 1961, and grew up in Connecticut and France. She graduated in 1983 from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Fine Arts and English. She worked for five years as a graphic designer in New York with Vignelli Associates, followed by three years of freelance work in San Francisco. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1990. Bryan received grants from... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 8:00am - 10:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Workshop: Rekindlers of Hope
Limited Capacity seats available

Using water to spark opportunities from the debris of ecocide.

As part of the Balance/Unbalance 2015 Conference, Latorica Studio presents a 2-day transdisciplinary quest, a re-imagining of our environmental crises as opportunities for transformation toward earth-centred paradigms.

A TRANSDISCIPLINARY STARTING POINT

“Indeed, there are two possible attitudes towards the severe Poly-crisis of the present, 1…]: either we chose to remain prisoners inside the ‘double-binds’ of the simple binary thinking, the comfortable inertia that can lead to self-destruction, or we dare to convert the crisis into an opportunity to go beyond the frustrating contradictions and double-binds and to discover the marvellous complexity of our Reality.” (Morin quoted in Dincᾰ)

WORKSHOP BRIEF

This workshop engages complexity, ruptures the linear and rational, and reaches into the unknown. As a group, we’ll aim to map out a blueprint for re-enchantment: we’ll be focusing specifically on `governance'; how do we re-enchant governing bodies/systems/structures toward an earth-centred paradigm which holds fluid respect for the Other. This is about discovering “the marvellous complexity of our Reality” (ibid.).

HOW & WHY

Practically, the workshop will employ several creative exercises, walking and dialogue sessions. Guided by transdisciplinary thinking, we’ll immerse ourselves in a 2-day mythological quest, using water as our central metaphor — the elixir of life. The aim of the workshop is to produce a piece that can be presented to governing bodies (such as the United Nations, National or State Environmental Departments, Companies and Communities), as a blueprint for working on the ground with complexity and in respect of the Other.

“In the long way towards yourself, you should rather explore the Other with the infinite of [their] being.”
(Nicolescu quoted in Dincᾰ.).
 

A LITTLE MORE DETAIL

Inspired by one of the main goals of transdisciplinarity, ‘an awakening of consciousness’, this workshop will be a creative-knowledge-outcome-based investigation into the opportunity for water to be our re-enchantment. It is possible that the future of human potential will be determined most explicitly, by how (well) we relate with water: culturally (politically), biologically, and spiritually.

The 2-day workshop brings together a maximum of 12 participants, ideally with diverse/different ‘knowledge’, who will work collectively to produce a ‘poetic’ piece exemplifying the transdisciplinary vision toward the ‘unity of human knowledge’. The workshop itself will be practice-led, incorporating creative, walking and dialogue sessions, which are grounded in the transdisciplinary principles of rigour, open-mindedness and tolerance. The final materiality and content of the poetic piece will be determined by the intersections of participants and workshop practices. However, the piece will be framed within the ‘Charter of Transdisciplinarity’ and have the specific objective of re-imagining our global environmental crisis as an opportunity for transformation toward an earth-centred paradigm (whether manifested as interior or exterior realities).

Requirements: Participants are not required to possess specific experience or skills, but will need openness, alacrity, and be eager for the challenge of a 2-day quest. After registering, participants will be sent three readings to consider and asked to find one object, prior to the workshop.

www.latorica.net

FEE 
$50 covers both days, including lunch and refreshments. Places limited to 12 participants — early registration recommended. 

 


Speakers
IB

Ilka Blue Nelson

My name is Ilka Blue Nelson. I do not belong to a watershed but come from generations of wanderers. As a Creative Ecologist I work at the intersections of cultural 8c biological diversity, particularly favoring river locales. My work is typical of an ecologist in that I am concerned with ecosystems as a whole, and work at restoring relationships within and between systems. My new studio, Latorica (www.latorica.net), seeks methods for... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 9:00am - 3:00pm
ASU Art Museum Ceramics Research Center at the Brickyard 699 South Mill Ave, Suite 108.

9:00am

Workshop: The Way Forward: Balloon-Enabled RedCross Workshop
THE WAY FORWARD: BALLOON-ENABLED REDCROSS WORKSHOP

As part of the conference, keynote speaker Pablo Suarez, Associate Director of the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre, presents The Way Forward, a quest to collectively construct a large solar hot air balloon made of plastic bags that would otherwise be trash.

THE WAY FORWARD: Balloon-Enabled RedCross Workshop

Co-creating wonder-producing artwork from a pernicious source of waste – the plastic bag – produces a powerful experience for all communities threatened by a changing climate. It attracts viewers and offers a means to re-imagine the world and its possibilities. The proposed crowd-made solar hot air balloon can be used as part of participatory processes to explore climate change science, adaptation, and mitigation. A flying solar balloon can promote resilience in any local context, offering local media a simple story for reporting community efforts in understanding and addressing climate change.

ASU alumni and artist Bobby Zokaites will lead a drop-in workshop on March 25 and 26 at Arizona State University. The workshop participants will actively construct this 30-foot hot air balloon, so come for a day or just an hour to help realize this project! 

Contact Bobby 


Speakers
BZ

Bobby Zokaites

Bobby Zokaites is an Arizona-based artist engaging his imagination through the creation of large-scale, colorful, and interactive spaces and objects. Enthusiastic about the idea of ‘play’, his work investigates themes of adventure and childhood while utilizing construction and assembly methods inspired by industrial processes. Approaching opportunities with big vision, the work is physically ambitious, conceptually dynamic, and... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

10:00am

Workshop: Designing Resilient Communities: The Choice to Stay
Context
Sea levels are rising, temperatures are increasing, water shortages are an increasing risk, and extreme weather events are becoming more common. All of these climate change consequences, framed in the variables of time and degree, have impacts on the health and safety of our societies, ecosystems and the stability of our economies. Can anyone really say that they fully understand the present let alone the future? How, given uncertainty, do we best address risk in a manner that optimizes the value of our investments and maximizes community energy on a coherent path to create a future we would prefer to have? What will need to be true in the future if people are to choose to stay and help communities be resilient and adaptive? What are the things that really matter?

Register HERE

Objective
Develop a new framework for decision making that recognizes city planning is first and foremost a social and political problem – not a design problem.

Introduction
Our citizens have a choice about where they live.

From our perspective as engineers, designers, artists and economists, working with resilient cities around the world there is no doubt that you we have to be thinking about how to redesign so that people can move back off the coast so they’re at less risk. How can any politician build a career on telling people they have to move?

We can design the solutions. We can make a rational argument based on science, fact and current examples – but people do not make decisions based on rationality, they make decisions based on personal beliefs, tribal beliefs, nostalgia, fear and a whole host of other emotional factors. The big question for the design community is:

“When are we going to realize we’re in a political situation and stop believing that better design will be compelling enough to create massive change?”

The world’s most developed societies are failing to respond to the warnings. The choice to act is a political one – and cities are forgetting their social contract.

A survey conducted in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in the United States revealed that if residents of Houston, Texas could be guaranteed the same job with an equitable salary in another city, 60% would choose to leave rather than stay and fight for the future success of their city.

How can a City ensure that the people it nurtures and educates choose to stay and invest in the successful future of their City?

Four Step Process
Clarity about the problem or the opportunity

Around the world there are an increasing number of high value fixes being proposed for the problems of climate change. Building physical resilience in cities often focuses on massive engineering projects, expensive retrofits and additional infrastructure. Building social resilience in cities is less often recognized as the critical issue it is. Too often it is simply discussed in terms of higher costs – higher healthcare costs for ageing people living longer, the pension fund deficit, the shortage of affordable housing.

Objective

  • Understand the difference between solving the attributes of a problem and identifying the fundamental issue.
  • Understand the critical intersections between the spectrum of systems (human, social, natural, economic, physical) upon which cities are built.
Agreement that the problem or the opportunity needs to be addressed

In almost every case, any proposed high budget solution meets with strong public resistance. This is inevitably because investments can only be made in one area of concern at the expense of another.

It can be all too easy for professionals to propose solutions to problems that stakeholders either do not think need addressing or are of lower priority than other issues cared about.  Part of this is the result of not getting the question right.  Part is what is referred to as “the tyranny of experts” where the public is expected to simply defer to the intellectual superiority of others when experience is clear that this is often a path to heartache.  Part is a failure to appreciate and incorporate the wisdom of the masses when they are provided unbiased information that is accessible to them, not just to the experts.  This is not to suggest that majority must rule.  The literature is pretty clear however that if institutions and individuals that the majority trusts and for whom they feel some kinship are not convinced that the problem at hand is a priority then the majority will withhold their permission.

Objective

  • Understand how to engage the “hive mind”.
  • Identify all the stakeholders in the project and understand what their motivations are.
Knowing what can be done and what this might achieve

There can be greater confidence (and influence) in addressing attributes of problems rather than fundamentals. Design can go a long way towards addressing aspects of some problems, but it cannot address the fundamentals.  The fundamentals are political.

Is the money we’re spending today going to be value added given what we can reasonably predict? How are we going to ensure that our investment in the future is actually based upon a strong foundation and an integrated approach to the future of communities? How do we understand the whole range of risks and how do we optimize available resources so that every investment we make helps address risk across the whole spectrum? What is the opportunity cost of not addressing the future?

Objective

Be able to answer the following questions:

  • Have we defined the problem correctly?
  • Can we achieve more than one purpose at a time?
  • Are we organized to realize value added opportunities?
  • Is this just a cost, or is there a return on investment?
Choosing to act differently

Without the choice to act differently, conventional wisdom will dominate and we will make much less progress than would otherwise be possible.  The choice to act differently is a risk management issue – political risk, financial risk, resource management risk.  Good design and good science can help reduce the risk of different choices of course.  More fundamental however are culture, nostalgia, aspiration, fear and what Frances Bacon described as the preference for truths that we would rather believe.

How can we communicate honestly and openly with the public about the levels of confidence we have in the decisions being made, and the limits to their impact?

Objective

  • Understand the sources of conflict that shape our choices towards a more resilient, sustainable future:
    • human centered vs. environment centered
    • faith vs. doubt
    • present vs. future
    • optimism vs. pessimism
    • equality vs. equity
    • security vs. risk
    • self interest vs. public interest
    • direct costs vs. externalities
    • market freedom vs. market constraint
  • Articulate the basis for a public relations campaign that empowers political leaders to make better decisions about investments that allow them to solve fundamental problems across a broad spectrum of interests with fewer resources.
Register HERE - $20 covers both days, including lunch and refreshments. The workshop will occur in GIOS on the ASU Tempe campus.  Further information will be forwarded to participants closer to the event.

Speakers
JJ

Jill Jago

Jill Jago is a communications strategist who specializes in connecting audiences with the complex, often abstract, concepts that can create barriers to more sustainable urban design. With over 20 years as a professional marketer in the urban planning, architecture and engineering industry, Jill is recognized for her expertise in developing new approaches and business strategies that make more sustainable outcomes possible. Her experience embraces... Read More →
GL

Gary Lawrence

Gary Lawrence is Corporate Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer for AECOM Technology Corporation (NYSE: ACM), an $8-billion global provider of professional technical and management support services. AECOM’s 45,000 employees — including architects, engineers, designers, planners, scientists and management professionals — serve clients in more than 130 countries around the world. | | Mr. Lawrence leads AECOM’s sustainability... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 10:00am - 5:00pm
Global Institute of Sustainability, 4th Floor, Rm 481 294 E University Dr, Tempe, AZ 85281

10:00am

Workshop: Future-Energy: Research and Design Storm
FUTURE-ENERGY: RESEARCH AND DESIGN STORM

Future-Energy: Research and Design Storm is a 2-day workshop.

What: To investigate pressing energy issues facing the Phoenix area and the US Southwest, and to use research and design thinking to generate ideas for potential sustainable solutions. This workshop is designed for interested conference participants and an interdisciplinary group of college students from ASU and the University of New Mexico.

Who: The workshop will be facilitated by Megan Halpern (ASU), Dan Collins (ASU) and Andrea Polli (The University of New Mexico)with students from ASU and The University of New Mexico

Day 1 
Research: Participants take on the role of “energy investigators” with the goal of building a visual “energy ethnography” for Phoenix and the Valley. In the morning session, interdisciplinary teams are formed (participants remain in these teams for the rest of the workshop), and sent on a visual and other-data-gathering scavenger hunt. Using smartphones, teams walk through parts of downtown Phoenix, taking photographs, gathering data and making brief observations, which they share over Twitter and other databases. Tweets relating to the workshop will include #BunB2015, and participants will be given a list of predetermined hashtags such as #waste, #surplus, or #scarcity, and “collect” images and observations with these tags. This exercise is designed to help participants build their observational skills related to ethnography and visual ethnography, and to help the larger group to build a catalog that can be used as inspiration during the rest of the workshop. During the scavenger hunt process, groups will also be able to observe and work with student technicians and organizers to use a Leica LIDAR system to rapidly capture sections of the downtown area as 3D point clouds. These images will be among the images tweeted with the hashtag #BunB2015, and may also include thematic hashtags from the hunt. At the end of the day, teams share their results with the larger group of participants.

Day 2
In the morning, participants choose a topic area or problem with which to engage, and begin their design projects. Design Storm: Teams will undergo a series of three structured creative design-storming exercises (or design ‘sprints’) that incorporate the catalog of materials gathered during the scavenger hunt. After each of the three activities, participants will briefly share their progress. During the afternoon session, groups will work independently to complete a proposal or prototype for a solution to their energy-related issue. Finally, the workshop will reconvene for reporting from each group on their project results.

After the workshop, the results of Future-Energy: Research and Design Storm are presented by participants in a poster-style session at the Balance/Unbalance conference.

Registration Link coming soon

Participating Courses:
ASU Visualization and Prototyping
UNM Computational Sustainability


Speakers
DC

Dan Collins

Dan Collins joined the School of Art faculty at Arizona State University in 1989. He is founding Co-Director of the PRISM lab (a 3D modeling and prototyping facility) and coordinator of the foundation art program (artCore). Collins studied studio art and art history at the University of California, Davis, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974. He holds a Master of Arts degree in Art Education from Stanford University (1975), a Master of... Read More →
MH

Megan Halpern

Megan Halpern is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, where she works with the Center for Science and the Imagination on “Emerge: Artists + Scientists Redesign the Future.” She earned her PhD in Science Communication at Cornell University. Her doctoral work focused on artist/scientist collaboration and the relationships between experts and publics, and... Read More →
AP

Andrea Polli

Andrea Polli is currently an Associate Professor of Art and Ecology with appointments in the College of Fine Arts and School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico.  She holds the Mesa Del Sol Endowed Chair of Digital Media and directs the Social Media Workgroup, a lab at the University's Center for Advanced Research Computing. She served as the founding Director of the Interdisciplinary Film and Digital Media Program and as... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 10:00am - 6:00pm
Grant Street Studios 605 E Grant St., Phoenix, AZ

1:30pm

Workshop: Acoustic Ecology Field Recording
The American Society for Acoustic Ecology presents a hands-on Field Recording Workshop in conjunction with the Balance/Unbalance 2015 Conference.

The goal of the workshop is to offer participants a hands-on experience of soundscape recording in a natural environment, while learning about the field recording practices of master artists, and participating in a conversation and skill-share with the artists and other participants around the techniques and philosophy of field recording. 

The workshop will take place on March 25-26 in Tempe, Arizona.  It will be led by three working artists, each with a significant and unique practice in field recording. The site of the hands-on session is the Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed at sunrise, 90 minutes north and east of Tempe.  More information and example recordings from the site can be found here.

SCHEDULE

Wednesday, March 25:
2:30-3:00pm Arrival and check-in at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (room TBD) 

3:00-6:00pm 
A brief introduction, then a presentation by each of the Lead Artists, followed by a Q & A with all three.

6:00-7:00pm
Dinner break (on your own — local restaurants will be identified)

7:00-9:00pm
Provided transportation to the Days Inn in Camp Verde, AZ.  

Thursday, March 26:
5:00-8:30am 
Field Recording Excursion to the Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed.  (Sunrise occurs at 6:24am)
NOTE: This site is part of the Listen(n) project of ASU.  Recordings made this morning can be submitted to the project for inclusion.
More information about the site can be found HERE.

8:30-10:30am 
Downtime at the Days Inn

10:30-12:30pm
Provided transportation back to Tempe/ASU

12:30-1:30pm: 
Lunch break (on your own — local restaurants will be identified)

1:30-4:00pm: 
An informal post-recording conversation led by the Lead Artists.  Individuals will be encouraged to share their recordings, discuss techniques, and share their skills and ideas with the group.  A sound system will be provided.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
– Registration cutoff for this workshop is March 18, 2015.

– The registration fee includes transportation, but does not include the your stay at the Days Inn in Camp Verde, AZ on the evening of March 25, 2015. Participants will need to book this on their own.  The Days Inn website.

– an email reminder with detailed information on locations, meeting points, and recommended packing list, etc. will be distributed two weeks before the event.

REGISTRATION & PAYMENT

Registration costs are $100 for ASAE members, and $150 for non-members.  The non-member fee includes membership, if desired. There is no partial registration fee available for attending only part of the workshop.Payments can be made via PayPal to: asae.treasurer@gmail.com. Alternate payment arrangements can be made. Please contact ASAE Treasurer Michael Bullock at the same address.

Any other inquiries about the workshop can be made to Stephan Moore.

Speakers
AL

Annea Lockwood

Annea Lockwood is known for her explorations of the rich world of natural acoustic sounds and environments, in works ranging from sound art and installations and performance art to concert music. Her music has been performed in many venues and festivals and extensively recorded. | | She has created several sound maps of famous rivers including the Danube, Hudson, and the Housatonic. See some of the press on her work here. Wild Energy, in... Read More →
JM

Jeremiah Moore

Sound designer, mixer, and sound artist Jeremiah Moore is known for his sensitive and listening-centered approach to sound production. His work has appeared in documentary films Miracle In A Box, Key of G, feature film Cherish, theater productions Merchant of Auschwitz (Denver Drama Critics Circle award for best sound design), permanent museum exhibits Prehistoric Journey at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, the Detention Barracks at the... Read More →
GW

Glenn Weyant

Glenn Weyant is a Tucson-based folk listener and a founding member of the early 21st Century Border Wall Deconstructionist Movement. For two decades Weyant has chronicled the Sonoran Desert soundscape via soundwalks, field recordings and performance. In borderland performances, a keystone of Weyant’s work includes amplifying and playing walls, militarized infrastructure and migrant ephemera with a cello bow and implements of mass... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 1:30pm - 6:00pm
Stauffer B103 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

2:00pm

Workshop: Reimagining Resilience: Walking Indigenous Waterways
Limited Capacity seats available

REIMAGINING RESILIENCE: WALKING INDIGENOUS WATERWAYS

Reimagining Resilience is a workshop that utilizes walking as a medium to create a sensory experience that reimagines urban geography. Beneath the Phoenix Metropolitan area exist the remnants of a complex canal system that sustained a desert society for approximately 1,500 years. At its apex, the canal system consisted of over 500 miles of canals supplying over 100,000 acres of farmland with water. Today, this legacy of sustainable desert living is concealed by a postindustrial landscape of asphalt parking lots, roadways, and suburban, residential and commercial developments.

This project intends to recognize and honor the ancient waterways and the indigenous ecologies that thrived in the pre-Columbian southwest of North America. Participants will be led on a walking tour along the paths of ancient Huhugam canals that once traveled through the area where the Arizona State University Campus and the City of Tempe now rest. They will be guided through a tour using their wireless mobile devices, allowing them to imagine and visualize layers of infrastructure and recover lost knowledge.

Workshop participants will collect GPS data, photographs and video, using their mobile handheld devices. Utilizing a collective process, we will brainstorm creative uses of this data, such as explorations of mapping, place-making, way-finding and geocaching interventions in public space. Participants will also construct a series of situations, real and virtual, which will inform a mediated guide that will be available to Balance-Unbalance attendees for the duration of the conference.

The guide will allow the public to visualize the past while considering how ancient master water engineers, the Huhugam, can inform a discussion about building resilient communities in the desert today. This is also a project that will continue beyond the conference. Participants will be asked to contribute to a collaborative photo essay that will be exhibited at a local gallery following the conference. The outcomes of the workshop will also be used to inform the development of future projects involving Huhugam history, technology and culture, such as interactive installations and mobile augmented reality experiences. The long-term goal is to further draw from Oasisamerican culture in order to construct an ecological and historical portrait of this region that combines quantitative and subjective characteristics of past and present ecologies and landscapes. In essence, this project will construct virtual ecologies and landscapes that will inform discussions surrounding resilient practices in response to climate change and ecological disruption.

This will be a 2-day workshop. Each daily workshop will be approximately 5 hours. Below is a tentative schedule:

Day 1: Short lecture on the history of the Huhugam canals and overview of their cultural and ecological practices. Tutorial on GPS, mapping, etc. Preliminary walking tour. Project brainstorming session.

Day 2: Main walking tour and data collection expedition. Sorting and cataloging of the data. Brainstorming and design of situations, mediated guide, etc.

Method of registration: e-mail


Speakers
AB

April Bojorquez

April Bojorquez has worked in the museum field nationally/internationally as an educator, curator, and researcher. She is influenced by participatory practice, social sculpture, and relational aesthetics. Bojorquez employs diverse strategies to produce immersive and interactive learning environments. Her scholarship exploring museum practice and food practice has lead to the production of numerous exhibits, symposia, and public programs.
CC

Carlos Castellanos

Carlos Castellanos is an interdisciplinary artist and researcher with a wide array of interests such as embodiment, cybernetics, ecology, phenomenology, artificial intelligence and art-science collaboration. He has received a National Science Foundation IGERT Fellowship in Interactive Digital Multimedia and was a California State University Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholar. His artworks have been exhibited at local, national and... Read More →
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 2:00pm - 7:00pm
Stauffer B111 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

3:00pm

Workshop: Eco-Literacy: Greening Public Imagination
ECO LITERACY: GREENING PUBLIC IMAGINATION

This workshop is based on the belief that the crisis in the environment is a crisis of education. It introduces strategies to cultivate eco literacy in the public, starting with young learners, teachers and school communities, to better address challenges in today’s society. It introduces life-long learning strategies that network systems thinking with art, science, design, and environmental practices, supporting critique of human progress and instilling a new ecology of stewardship.

This workshop takes place on Thursday, March 26 from 2:30 – 4:30 at Arizona State University. It will be led by two architects and professors of architecture and environmental design with practice and experience working with diverse public groups and teachers and schools. More information about their workshops and recognitions can be found at www.NEXT.cc, which provides 24/7 eLearning Eco-Literacy support to all fifty states and over one hundred fifty countries.

Participants will leave empowered to facilitate change in their schools and school communities, supported by an open discovery network of learning resources to share with teachers, administrators and changemakers.

Eco Literacy, a term coined by David Orr, author of Earth in Mind: On Education, Environment and Human Prospect, has been added to social and emotional intelligence as a third and necessary intelligence (Coleman, 2009). Social and emotional intelligence extend empathy and ability to see from another’s perspective. Ecological intelligence applies this capacity to an understanding of natural systems and larger Meta cognitive skills of empathy for all life. Inculcating and inspiring wonder of the natural and built world and a developing a sense of place and purpose is the path toward eco literacy. This workshop will share strategies for greening imagination through environmental awareness, engagement and advocacy concentrating on young imaginations. Introducing the OXFAM concept of the environmental ceiling and conditions that are exceeding it and social foundations that are not being met, participants will access organizations working to raise awareness, build knowledge and create change in the synthesis of water, energy and food systems. Development of environmental stewardship, or respect for and caretaking of places--natural systems in relation to human constructed ideas--requires individuals who have “a basic comprehension of ecology, human ecology and the concepts of sustainability” (Orr, 2006). This workshop shares an accessible systems thinking approach that topically connects virtual field trips, museum interactive and global art, science, and design practices with trans-disciplinary activities, rethinking relationships between the built and natural worlds. Participants will locate their watershed, map their closest river, and evaluate their daily water use in relation to water use in other parts of the world. Water equivalencies of everyday things will change thinking about how to conserve, consume and choose to use water and for what purposes. Issues of food surplus will be set against food deserts and access to food, and shared with strategies for localization. Carbon footprints will be examined to rethink wellbeing and progress. Comparisons of material extraction, production, manufacturing, transportation and life cycle will be featured that expand normal consumerism to include embodied energy, maintenance and longevity as factors of choice. Participants will find that imagination and creativity are essential energies for rethinking relationships starting at an early age, using new ways of learning, sharing data and making. Eco Literacy, a necessary form of intelligence and a necessity of 21st century local-to-global learning as part of the public imagination, is essential to creating a culture of care and affectingly changing perceptions, awareness, understanding and citizen actions.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES

  • Introduce and define eco literacy as a 21st century necessity
  • Address the importance of making the environment a priority across school curricula, school campuses and school communities
  • Introduce ways culture, technology and society shape design responses in greening indoor and outdoor learning environments
  • Encourage interaction between people and the natural and built
    environment

REGISTRATION & PAYMENT 

Registration for the workshop is $25 and supports continued evolution and maintenance of the eLearning network. Please send confirmation of attendance to Mark Keane at Keane@uwm.edu.

Payments can be made to www.NEXT.cc, Inc. PayPal. Alternate payment arrangements will be accepted at the workshop.


Speakers
LK

Linda Keane

Linda Keane, AIA, is an environmental designer, architect and academic, passionately active in greening public imagination. She combines architectural practice with animation, publications and workshops collaborating with diverse practices on envisioning projects that transform sustainable experiences. Co-founder of STUDIO 1032 with partner, Mark Keane, she contributes to ecological initiatives along the Milwaukee- Chicago corridor, including the... Read More →
MK

Mark Keane

Mark Keane, president of the educational non-profit, NEXT.cc, is an artist, architect, and professor of architecture. He teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he serves as the head of the Frank Lloyd Wright Initiative. A Retrospective of Animated Architecture, Films by Mark and Linda Keane, received a PBS Emmy and is included in the Metropolitan Museum of Art and J. Paul Getty Archives. Keane is a dynamic teacher, introducing... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Stauffer B111 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

3:30pm

Chicago Tree Project Virtual Film Screening
Trees: The Fifth Season
A creative afterlife for trees.

Chicago Sculpture International has partnered with the City of Chicago and its Park District to transform dead and dying elm, ash and locust trees into works of art. Trees have always been important cultural symbols - symbols of life, death, sustainability, support and protection. The ecological devastation occurring in our city, the death and removal of more than 10,000 of these cultural symbols, creates a sense of loss in our communities. The Chicago Tree Project is an innovative model for a type of site-specific public art project highlighting the effects of climate change that provides opportunities for sculptors to pay tribute to the decades of life trees have offered, creating new symbols, often in an artistic desert, thereby creating The Fifth Season.

The question arises, given the success of the Chicago Tree Project, can artists in Los Angeles transform their dying palm trees? Can the dying aspens of Colorado be sculpted to create new symbols and can dying oaks in Illinois and Wisconsin be used to create art in small towns and rural communities? How do communities and artists partner to make this happen? Can you make it happen?

Please click this link to stream the 37 minute film http://youtu.be/0f8FXFel3UI

Link for 10 minute gallery http://vimeo.com/115735756

We are encouraging delegates to stream this film simultaneously at the programmed time. Please use the hashtags #BALANCE15 and #ChicagoTreeProject on social media platforms. 


Speakers
MM

Margot McMahon

The figure and organic form interpreted in geometric rhythms are what Margot McMahon models in clay and casts in metal and concrete, welds in steel or carves in stone. Her work is a rhythm of lights and shadows playing over textured surfaces of forms, which refer to the every person as the hero. She has been called the Studs Terkel of the sculpting world for her humanistic interpretations. Captured in seated poses or walking stances, her forms... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Virtual/Online

5:00pm

Workshop: Creating Place: A Multi-sensory Exploration of Space and Environment
Limited Capacity seats available

CREATING PLACE: A MULTI-SENSORY EXPLORATION OF PLACE AND ENVIRONMENT

In this 2-hour workshop facilitated by dance artists Mary Fitzgerald and Jessica Rajko, participants will engage in various movement activities using the environment and natural surroundings as an impulse for creativity and trans-disciplinary composition. We will explore a multi-sensory approach to the creative process that draws upon sight, sound, proprioception, and touch to examine our relationship to the urban desert. Throughout this experience we will consider the following questions: How do we observe, engage with and draw inspiration from our surroundings? How do we compose place-based work that is reflective of and sensitive to that place? How does place influence an experience? How is place a multi-sensory experience?

Participants who take this workshop will come away with methods for:

  1. Engaging place as part of the creative process
  2. Developing new content inspired by urban desert environments
  3. Creating site-specific and site-adaptive work from a movement-based perspective
  4. Facilitating work in the area of creative placemaking.

SCHEDULE

5-5:20 pm: Brief introduction to the facilitators and discussion about current site dance practices and multi-sensory approaches to place-inspired composition

5:20-5:30 pm: Simple movement warm-up (no prior experience necessary)

5:30-6:15 pm: Experiential exploration of site, involving simple movement activities that “document” the environment through the filter of particular senses; this process will serve as the impetus for creating short compositions with partners

6:15-6:45 pm: Brief sharing of work

6:45-7:00 pm: Closing discussion about questions that emerge and possible applications of this process to other disciplines

REGISTRATION

No fee is required to participate in this workshop.

Please register by emailing Mary Fitzgerald  or Jessica Rajko byMarch 25, 2015.


Speakers
MF

Mary Fitzgerald

Mary Fitzgerald is a dance artist and educator whose creative work includes choreography (with and without interactive media), socially engaged arts practices, and dance film. She was a member of Kei Takei’s Moving Earth for nearly ten years, performing and teaching internationally. She has been a guest artist for numerous professional companies and dance programs in the U.S and abroad, and her choreography has received funding from the... Read More →
JR

Jessica Rajko

Jessica Rajko is an interdisciplinary artist whose work integrates dance-based movement practices with interaction design. She has collaborated with artists such as Mary Fitzgerald, David Therrien and Casey Farina, and performed in work by Ashleigh Leite, Nora Chipaumire and Charlotte Boye-Christensen. She is the co-founder and co-director of urbanSTEW (urbanSTEW.org), a non-profit organization whose mission is to inspire and expand the relevance... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Nelson Plaza 51 East 10th Street Tempe, AZ

6:00pm

Art Exhibit: Old Graduate Sculpture Studio
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm, March 22-29. 

Fecundity
Bob Vanderbob

Fecundity: 1. the ability to cause or assist healthy growth; 2. the ability to produce offspring; 3. the creative power of the mind or imagination

Will the fecundity of our minds come to the rescue of biological fecundity? Will we collapse and go extinct, or adapt, survive and thrive? It is a delicate balance.

On one hand, the natural systems that sustain human activity are stretched to their limit. Biodiversity is dwindling. We humans are increasingly prey to fertility problems, due to the accumulation of pollution in our bodies. On the other, our understanding of biosystems is exploding. We are decoding nature’s fundamental processes at an accelerating pace with the help of the exponential rise in computing power. 

Whereas our ancestors conjured up potent fertility deities associated with pregnancy, birth, life, rainfall, harvest, love, sex and beauty, the dry and abstract vocabulary we use today in relation to fecundity is not exactly rousing: 'the environment', 'sustainability', 'biodiversity'...

With this installation, Bobvan proposes a mythological, poetic experience, a revitalization of the age-old archetype encompassing the nested metaphorical meanings of the notion of fecundity to include the agility of the mind and the potential of the imagination. 

The installation is inspired by a Neolithic fecundity figure found in Harappa, in the Indus Valley.

A 3D-printed female figure in unsmoothed low-poly, a metaphor for the human species as an ongoing work in progress, is balanced on her head. She becomes a screen onto which are projected images of life, energy, water, bacteria, sperm and ovules, electronic patterns, genetic and binary code. The modern-day 'power' icon is projected onto her skull, reminiscent of Neolithic representations of the vulva, a universal fecundity symbol. In stark contrast, images of desert landscapes in video negative and of Venus, Earth's barren sister planet, are projected onto the back wall. The whole installation is enshrined in a large mirror box, evoking the ongoingness of the universe-as-process by reflecting the fecundity figure ad infinitum in all directions. 

Fecundity is part of Bobvan's Artificial Mythology project; it is presented at Balance-Unbalance as a world premiere. 

ArtLAB Mobile ECO-STUDIO

Mobile Eco Studio is a social art project involving artist-led workshops, planting indigenous species in unused bits of land. It integrates indigenous culture, biology, and community engagement, and adds a unique approach to the related subjects of climate and culture. Its special relationship to the climate and culture of Arizona will help visitors at the conference become more familiar with this unique place and ecosystem.


Speakers
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →

Artists
BV

Bob Vanderbob

Bob Vanderbob, a.k.a. Bobvan, is an artist and composer based in Brussels (Belgium). He explores the interaction between art, mythology, science, and science-fiction to convey his poetic vision of the techno-human condition. He calls his project Artificial Mythology, a matrix of mythological modules, a modern myth-scape for the current context of technological acceleration.
DA

Desert ArtLAB

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary initiative dedicated to a public art practice exploring connections between ecology, technology, and community. Through multimedia performance, food practice, and visual and social art, desert ArtLAB seeks to inform a discourse of desert urban landscapes, while challenging residents to consider how native ecology can inform identity, equality and resilience in our desert culture and... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Old Graduate Sculpture Studio 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Balance-Unbalance 2015: EcoQuantum 2.0
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm March 22-29.

Robotanic Mobile Gardens--Soybots III
Shannon McMullen & Fabian Winkler

Climate, energy, agriculture, politics: the project Robotanic Mobile Gardens – SoyBots III belongs to a series of art installations and discursive interventions, collectively focused on critical gardening strategies which demonstrate just how deeply entangled these conditions are. In the global context, soybean production is at the heart of both climate change problems and suggested solutions to food security issues. Thus, soybean plants are mobilized for their significance to global food production, their strong association with a hybridity between nature and technology —in this case as a result of biotechnological strategies for increasing crop yields through genetic modification—and vulnerability to changing climate and water conditions as a result of global warming. 

Gardens express ideas and social relations; some are sites where art and technology produce material realities, social narratives and visualize politics. In this case, mobile gardens unite code, robotics and soybean plants (robotanics) to create a speculative interactive installation that suggests questions about climate, place and agriculture implicated in contemporary practices and values. As self-pollinating organisms in combination with a light-seeking mobile robotic platform, temperature and moisture sensors, soybean plants metaphorically address the evolving interdependence between humans and cultivated crops and the underlying political nature of photosynthesis. 

These relationships are expressed through three autonomous robotic platforms, outfitted with custom planter boxes containing soybean plants, that roam interior space in search of optimal light conditions and ideal temperatures while monitoring soil moisture to promote plant growth in local conditions. To identify optimal light conditions, the robot host employs a phototropic control strategy, using sensors to track and follow sunlight intensity or to locate LED grow lights. Moisture sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller trigger a flashing yellow light when moisture levels are too low, prompting humans to attend to the plants. Finally, temperature sensors are similarly used to allow the soybeans to indicate their need for increased or decreased warmth. ‘Shivering’ indicates a need for higher temperatures. In contrast, the robot will seek dimmer locations when it is too warm. With SoyBots III, soybeans become an ‘evocative object’ (Turkle, 2011) – something that can provoke reflection, speculation and attract emotion.  

Words for Water
Tracey Benson

Words for Water explores a diversity of languages, including Indigenous Australian languages, as a starting point to evoke a connection to water as the sustaining element of all life. Indigenous cultures have an acute understanding of and connection to the relationship between body, environment (site) and identity, and this project seeks to awaken this connection more broadly across cultures and practices.

Words for Water is an exploration into the many aspects of the chemical of H2O. Water makes up over 70 percent of the human body; it is essential for sustaining life and has massive social and cultural significance.

Water may seem ubiquitous, but it has some rather uncommon properties. At the atomic level, water can influence how life and landscapes are formed, such as how water moves through a plant and how rivers meander around bends. It is also the only chemical that be formed in three states – vapour, liquid and solid.

This project uses a range of mixed reality media approaches – the use of augmented media to ‘trigger’ sound and video, the development of a smart phone/tablet app, gallery and installation based exhibitions, and a projection work that bring this project together in a filmic, linear narrative.

Words for Water is seen as an ever-expanding project, allowing for infinite expansion of words, thoughts and stories related to water. The project has appeared at SCANZ2015, New Plymouth, New Zealand; Photoacess, October 2014; 3WDS14, Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium, March 2014; and Stage One of Words for Water was presented as part of the Transreal Topologies exhibition at the Royal Institute of Science in Adelaide, October 2013, held in conjunction with the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR).


Artists
FW

Fabian Winkler

Fabian Winkler is an artist working at the intersections of the moving image, sound, spatial structures and robotics. He explores the aesthetic potential and the cultural implications of seemingly well-known artifacts through the use of new technologies. Conceptually, his works are often influenced by archeological research into the history of technology and observations of social processes. Winkler is currently an Associate Professor of Visual... Read More →
SM

Shannon McMullen

Shannon McMullen is a jointly appointed Assistant Professor in the Electronic and Time-Based Art Program in the School of Visual and Performing Arts and in American Studies at Purdue University. She received a PhD in sociology from the University of California, San Diego, in 2007. Based on her fieldwork experience and dissertation writing in the areas of visual and material culture, Dr. McMullen has developed a creative practice that... Read More →
TB

Tracey Benson

Tracey Benson is a green geek/artist/researcher into connected communities, UX, WCAG, Gov.2.0, sustainability, tech/art synergies, maps and FOSS. Tracey has been active in a number of media arts communities: in 2007, she co-founded the Canberra chapter of dorkbot with Alexandra Gillespie and was also a moderator on the internationally renowned new media list –empyre- from 2005-07. She has participated in many international digital media... Read More →


Thursday March 26, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Grant Street Atrium 605 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

7:00pm

Night Gallery Art Opening
The event marks the openning of the art and installation program of the conference. 

The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 

Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution …


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
CC

Cecily Culver

Cecily Culver is a maker and experiment conductor; her sculptural works and immersive environments exist in the space between the ephemeral and the tangible.<><>This translation of thoughts began in her hometown of Rochester, New York, where she completed her BFA at<>Rochester Institute of Technology in interdisciplinary studio art. Culver is currently exploring the natural and man-made oddities of Phoenix, Arizona. She is... Read More →
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
RC

Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →



Thursday March 26, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281
 
Friday, March 27
 

7:00am

Watch Sunrise at James Turrell Skyspace: Air Apparent
Friday March 27, 2015 7:00am - 9:00am
James Turrell Skyspace: Air Apparent ASU, Tempe, west side of Rural Road at Terrace Road in Tempe

8:00am

The Way Forward - Launch the solar, lighter than air balloon sculpture

This event marks the launching of The Way Forward, a collectively constructed, large solar hot air balloon made of 11,000 plastic bags that would otherwise be trash. A project suggested by Keynote speaker Pablo Suarez, Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre, based on the invitation to an artistic experimental performance by artist Tomás Saraceno.

Co-created in a conference workshop, is this wonder-producing artwork from a pernicious source of waste – the plastic bag – produces a powerful experience for all communities threatened by a changing climate. It attracts viewers and offers a means to re-imagine the world and its possibilities. The proposed crowd-made solar hot air balloon can be used as part of participatory processes to explore climate change science, adaptation, and mitigation. A flying solar balloon can promote resilience in any local context, offering local media a simple story for reporting community efforts in understanding and addressing climate change.

This iteration of the project has been managed by sculptor Bobby Zokaites 


Speakers
PS

Pablo Suarez

Pablo Suarez is the Associate Director for Research and Innovation at the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre, as well as visiting fellow at Boston University, research scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria, and faculty member at University of Lugano (Switzerland) and University College London (UK). | He has consulted for the UN Development Programme, the World Food Programme, the World Bank... Read More →
BZ

Bobby Zokaites

Bobby Zokaites is an Arizona-based artist engaging his imagination through the creation of large-scale, colorful, and interactive spaces and objects. Enthusiastic about the idea of ‘play’, his work investigates themes of adventure and childhood while utilizing construction and assembly methods inspired by industrial processes. Approaching opportunities with big vision, the work is physically ambitious, conceptually dynamic, and... Read More →



Friday March 27, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
Nelson Plaza 51 East 10th Street Tempe, AZ

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Walking with Water
This exhibit is open 8:00 am-5:00 pm, March 22-29. 

World-Wide-Walks / between earth, water &sky / DESERTS
Peter D'Agostino

World-Wide-Walks have been performed on six continents over the past four decades. Initiated in 1973 as The Walk Series, these video "documentation/performances" evolved into video-web projects during the 1990s and mobile-locative media installations in the 2000s. World-Wide-Walks explore elements of natural, cultural and virtual identities: mixed realities of walking through physical environments and virtually surfing the web. Current projects focus on climate change and the effects of global warming to address concerns for a sustainable future related to ‘glocal’ - global / local – ecologies.

It is conceived as a trilogy of walk projects in the Chihuahuan, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts. The installation proposed for Balance-Unbalance 2015 is based on walks performed in the Chihuahuan Desert at White Sands, Los Alamos and Alamogordo. The mix of ‘natural-cultural-virtual’ concepts is most striking for me at these sites as boundaries for the convergence of nature and culture, spirituality and science. Here, at this crossroads in the desert where the ancient Native American stories of emergence from Mother Earth are told, it is also the site of the first Atomic Bomb detonation. ( The “Fat Boy” bomb on July 16, 1945 preceded “Little Boy”, August 6, Hiroshima; and “Fat Man,” August 9, Nagasaki.) One walk is around a “Fat Man,” a bomb casing on display at the White Sands Missile Range Museum. Walks around Soaptree Yucca plants are testaments to natural survival in the desert ecosystem; while another walk through a field of petroglyphs is about a time dating from the Ancestral Pueblo period of c. 1300 to 1600 AD. (Petroglyph National Monument on New Mexico's West Mesa near Albuquerque.)

Pink Noise 
Yolande Harris

Pink Noise challenges preconceptions about underwater sound by juxtaposing an idyllic video of the ocean surface with the overwhelming, yet often strangely beautiful, anthropogenic noise underneath. By involving the audience in an otherwise alien, inaccessible environment, the installation aims to establish a more empathetic relationship to the underwater world through the immersive experience of the artwork.

The installation consists of a video projection on the floor and a sound recording listened to on headphones. The headphones hang from the ceiling, centered over the video, about 18 inches from the floor (like a fishing line). At first, the audience only sees the video of colorful turquoise and pink light reflecting on the surface of the sea. In order to experience what is beneath the surface, the audience member must step into the video and put on the headphones, at which point s/he is immersed in the piece. The hydrophone recording, made at a Spanish National Marine Reserve at peak tourist season, reveals a surprising range of industrial sounds beneath the surface – loud thumps, grinds, and tones from boat engines, anchors and depth sounders. The underwater sonic environment sharply contrasts with the idyllic video of the surface at the same location, revealing the extent of noise pollution even in a protected marine habitat.

Pink Noise was previously exhibited at: Transmediale, Berlin, 2010; Issue Project Room, New York 2011 (screened version); WRO Media Art Biennale, Wroclaw, Poland 2011; MADATAC Festival, Madrid 2013.

Undercurrent
Teresa Connors & Shannon Harris

Undercurrent is one of a series of ongoing generative audiovisual installations which explores the notion of ecological performativity. Here, the term "ecological" refers to the philosophical school of thought which believes the world to be a network of interconnected and interdependent phenomena. Constructed in Max 6, this generative installation layers a network of visual and aural content that affect each other simultaneously to produce an ever-evolving work. The assets of this installation include oceanic audiovisual field recordings from the west coast of Canada, algorithmic data collected from an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), and real-time convolution of audio field recordings with samples acoustic instruments. The intention of this practice is to contribute in an artistic, experiential, and dynamical means to current thinking around material agency. I purpose that by doing so, creative practice can contribute towards the development of an ontological consideration of ecological performativity. By viewing the world as a network of phenomena that are fundamentally interconnected and interdependent, the result is a performative openness to the world that suggests a means by which to empathically engage, from a non-human exceptionalism perspective, with the complexities of being in, and of the world in the 21st century. Undercurrent is an attempt to foster a greater recognition of the ongoing and entangled ebb and flow of agency between humans and the environment.  

Speakers
PD

Peter D'Agostino

Peter d’Agostino’s pioneering photography, video and interactive projects have been exhibited internationally. Surveys of his work include: Interactivity and Intervention, 1978-99, Lehman College Art Gallery, New York; the World-Wide-Walks projects at the University Art Gallery, Bilbao, Spain (2012); and the University of Paris I Partheon-Sorbonne (2003). Major group exhibitions include: The Whitney Museum of American Art (Biennial... Read More →
YH

Yolande Harris

Yolande Harris is an artist engaged with sound, its image and its role in relating humans and their technologies to the environment. Her artistic projects take the form of audio-visual installations and performances, instruments, walks, performative lectures and writings. Her work is presented internationally in the context of visual art exhibitions, music venues and media art festivals and conferences, including MACBA Barcelona, Schirn... Read More →

Artists
SH

Shannon Harris

Shannon Harris is an artist whose film and video work reflect a creative practice that draws from the particulars and subjectivities of personal experience and landscape. The ways in which documentary and experimental film/video practices intersect, and the potential of expanded notions of documentary are areas of interest to her. Shannon’s work has been screened in North America, New Zealand and the EU. She attended Simon Fraser University... Read More →
TC

Teresa Connors

Teresa Connors is active in many aspects of music practice, being an acoustic/electroacoustic composer, opera singer, film scorer, and multimedia installation artist. She collaborates with many artists from diverse backgrounds and with different sensibilities. Originally from Newfoundland, Canada, Teresa holds a Master of Music degree in composition (1st class honours) from Waikato University in New Zealand and studied both composition and... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Digital Culture Gallery 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Registration
You should register online HERE
This will generate a registration listing and also send you a receipt 
Conference registration name tags will be available to collect at the conference

 

Friday March 27, 2015 8:00am - 6:00pm
Music School Foyer 50 E. Gammage Parkway Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Water Imbalance

The exhibit is open 8:00 am to 10:00 pm, March 22-29.  

Water Imbalance
is a curated exhibition planned for the Balance-Unbalance 2015 conference at the Arizona State University Tempe Campus.

Featuring the work of:
Kim Abeles
Sukey Bryan
Betsy Damon
Danielle Eubank
J.J. L’Heureux
Sandra Mueller
Melissa Reischman
Eco Art Collective


Curated by Sandra Mueller and Danielle Eubank

As the majority of the world’s population, it is incumbent upon women to be guardians of the future. We need to look after our people, our natural environment, and our water. Water is a shared resource amongst all people. It is our provider – for sustenance, fishing, farming and regulation of the earth’s climate. This is an exhibition that makes a statement about the unifying preciousness of water by documenting it all over the world with paintings, photography, mixed media, and installations by leading environmental women artists. 

The conceptual theme of the exhibition addresses the consequences of the human footprint globally by looking at the imbalance of the availability and cleanliness of water. We have specifically examined water scarcity, cleanliness, access, expanding deserts, urban engagement, climate change and diminishing glaciers that all reflect an unworkable imbalance. Artists included a written statement addressing water imbalance. For the visual theme, emphasis is on the view of water from a geographical perspective as well as a state of mind.  – Danielle Eubank, March 2015

Sandra Mueller
Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds. Her colorful abstract paintings and photographs have been shown broadly throughout the Pacific Rim region.

Danielle Eubank
Danielle Eubank is a painter interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. Danielle Eubank is an expedition artist in pursuit of painting all of the major bodies of water in the world. She is beginning by painting all of Earth’s oceans. She sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship, The Antigua, on an expedition to the High Arctic in Autumn 2014. She was an Expedition Artist on the Phoenicia, a replica 600 B.C. Phoenician vessel that circumnavigated Africa and was the Expedition Artist on the Borobudur Ship, a replica of an 8th century Indonesian boat that sailed around the African continent.  

Waste Water
Kristian Derek Ball

As unavoidable as it is, water is something that we as humans have to waste to some degree. But we still have options on how we approach, view and interact with our water-related activities. 

The idea behind this new installation is to raise a hyper-awareness of the process of water draining away from us during its usage. The sonic experience of listening to the phenomenon of water in action and its interfacing with those using it, can lead us into this mode of listening which may juxtapose traditional symbolic references. 

The Human Delta
Rachel Mayeri

A delta is a place where a river meets another body of water. A river carries sediment that leaves a triangular pattern where the two bodies of water intersperse. Human bodies are nutrient-rich water and sediment transportation systems. The Human Delta occurs at the toilet, an effluence of millions of gallons of sediment-rich water, which mixes with rivers, aquifers, bays, land, and the ocean. 

Environmentalists are dealing with the human delta as toxic concentrations of bacteria, pharmaceuticals, and other chemicals in partially treated wastewater routinely pollute waterways. Some chemicals which course through human bodies--heart medicine, antibiotics, estrogen--may adversely affect fish populations and their habitats. Yet, the chemicals which are naturally produced in urine--nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium--rather than be construed as waste or pollution, can be used as important nutrients for the soil in which plants grow. Agrobusiness uses fertilizers derived from fossil fuels and mined from limited reserves, contributing to global warming. A more sustainable solution would be to recycle human urine, treat it, and use it as fertilizer, linking the Human Delta back to the ecological cycle productively, rather than destructively. 

The Human Delta is an art-science project intended to increase public awareness about the human "waste" at its point of departure: the bathroom. A series of posters are installed in conference bathrooms, and are available for distribution. Toilets are interstitial, potentially contemplative spaces, which underscore the hidden, segregated, white-tiled, and taboo nature of the subject. 

One poster is about the flow of pharmaceuticals from human bodies into a river delta. Informed by scientific research which has found concentrations of caffeine in the Puget Sound, the poster depicts the Starbucks logo as a flow of caffeine, hormones, antibiotics, and medicines entering and leaving the human body, and cycling back as disturbed (caffeinated, aggressive, effeminate) fish. Another poster is about the potential of urine as a fertilizer. It depicts a farmer fountain: a stream of water pours forth from kidneys and bladder, fertilizing a field of corn. Text on the poster reads: "urine is fertilizer" / "nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium." 


Artists
BD

Betsy Damon

Betsy Damon is an eco-activist artist who works with water, site-specific sculpture, urban design and community. In 1998, Betsy created the Living Water Garden in Sichuan, China, a six-acre urban park that has become an icon for natural water-cleaning systems. She has worked on design teams, notably contributing the wetland system in the Beijing Olympic Park. In the US, Betsy has worked with communities, bringing together arts... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Eubank

Danielle Eubank

University of La Verne
Danielle Eubank is a painter and curator interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. She is painting all of the major bodies of water on the planet, starting with the oceans. In addition to her studio practice, Ms. Eubank is an expedition artist. She sailed aboard the tall ship, The Antigua, on an art and science expedition to the High Arctic in... Read More →
EC

Eco-Art Collective

The Eco-Art Collective is an activist group of the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art dedicated to sustainable stewardship of the environment. Participating Artists: Carolyn Applegate, Amy Bauer, Marie Cenkner, Danielle Eubank, Katherine Kean, Nancy Lissaman, Marion Melchiorre, Sandra Mueller, Annemarie Rawlinson, Seda Saar, Louise Wannier, Frances White.
KA

Kim Abeles

Kim Abeles' installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Among her many honors, Abeles has been recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation, Pollack-Krasner Foundation, and the California Arts Council. She is a 2014 Lucas Visual... Read More →
KD

Kristian Derek Ball

Kristian Derek Ball has designed sound and written music for theatrical and film companies both nationally and internationally, as well as recorded and produced music for various artists and musicians worldwide. He has designed sound for regional and local companies such as Metropolitan Theatre Ensemble in Kansas City, The Children’s Theatre Company in Minneapolis, and Allentown Public Theatre among others, and has spent the last 5 years... Read More →
MR

Melissa Reischman

Melissa Reischman was born in Portland, Oregon. She studied graphic design at the Colorado Institute of Art and went on to build a career as an award-winning graphic designer. During this time she followed the urge to develop her own artistic vision through paintings and drawings, studying with Richard Bunkhall and Ray Turner at Art Center College of Design. Reischman’s work explores movement of light, color and atmosphere. Her paintings... Read More →
RM

Rachel Mayeri

Rachel Mayeri is a Los Angeles-based media artist working at the intersection of science and art. Her projects explore topics ranging from the history of special effects to the human animal. Her videos and installations have shown at Sundance, Berlinale, Documenta 13, Ars Electronica, The Getty Museum, and MoMA PS1. She is the recipient of numerous grants, including the Wellcome Trust, Creative Capital, and the California Council for the... Read More →
SM

Sandra Mueller

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds... Read More →
SB

Sukey Bryan

Sukey Bryan was born in New Jersey in 1961, and grew up in Connecticut and France. She graduated in 1983 from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Fine Arts and English. She worked for five years as a graphic designer in New York with Vignelli Associates, followed by three years of freelance work in San Francisco. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1990. Bryan received grants from... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 8:00am - 10:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

8:30am

Native American Song and Dance Welcome - Bird Singing and Dancing by the River
We are deeply honored to be able to share with you Onk- Akimel O'odham songs and dances as a welcome to O'odham land and to the theme of the conference.

Bird Singing and Dancing by the River


Bird Singing and Dancing by the River is a youth dance group of children and singers from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. Known for its showcase of Chiyer (bird) singing and dancing of the Xalychidom Piipaash, the group also performs Onk- Akimel O'odham songs and dances. The group has performed for 10 years, and has traveled to the related tribes of Xalychidom Piipaash to include tribes in Southern California, along the Colorado River and New Mexico.

Annette Ramirez and Lynwood Vest formed the group to teach youth traditional songs and dances of the Odham and Piipaash to help preserve these songs and dances. As Lynwood Vest explained, "It is our responsibility to teach these things to our youth so they in turn can teach their own children"


Friday March 27, 2015 8:30am - 9:00am
Nelson Plaza 51 East 10th Street Tempe, AZ

9:00am

Conference Welcome
Limited Capacity seats available

Confernence Welcome and outline of objectives and special projects

Speakers
avatar for Sabine Feisst

Sabine Feisst

Professor of Music, Arizona State University
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American... Read More →
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy

9:20am

Ricardo Dal Farra
Is it worth being here? (reflections on knowledge, embodiment and action)

Speakers
RD

Ricardo Dal Farra

Dr. Ricardo Dal Farra is professor of electroacoustic music and media arts at Concordia University, Canada and director of the Electronic Arts Research Centre (CEIArtE) at the National University of Tres de Febrero, Argentina. | | He has been director of Hexagram, the Centre for Research-Creation in Media Arts and Technologies, Canada; researcher on electroacoustic music and media arts history for UNESCO, France; director of the Multimedia... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 9:20am - 9:45am
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy

9:45am

Climate Change Keynote - Pablo Suarez (Red Cross)
Limited Capacity seats available

How can Art and the Red Cross work together to save lives, mobilize and inspire?  Global experiences on climate risk management.

Live stream here  

Moderators
RD

Ricardo Dal Farra

Dr. Ricardo Dal Farra is professor of electroacoustic music and media arts at Concordia University, Canada and director of the Electronic Arts Research Centre (CEIArtE) at the National University of Tres de Febrero, Argentina. | | He has been director of Hexagram, the Centre for Research-Creation in Media Arts and Technologies, Canada; researcher on electroacoustic music and media arts history for UNESCO, France; director of the Multimedia... Read More →

Speakers
PS

Pablo Suarez

Pablo Suarez is the Associate Director for Research and Innovation at the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre, as well as visiting fellow at Boston University, research scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria, and faculty member at University of Lugano (Switzerland) and University College London (UK). | He has consulted for the UN Development Programme, the World Food Programme, the World Bank... Read More →



Friday March 27, 2015 9:45am - 10:30am
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy

10:30am

Indigenous Panel - Connecting Communities
We are honored to share in the knowledge and wisdom of these indigenous elders: (The image below is of the Leweton Women’s Water Music Troupe, lead by Edith (right), getting ready to perform at the Nanda Blue Hole in Santo.)

Presenters include:

Ofelia Rivas - O'odham Elder: 

Statement by Ofelia Rivas on Shu-da’g (Water)

Water is life for all life, not just humans.

The physical altering of whole terrains impacts all life.  From the leveling of mountains and hills, to the altering of bodies of water and the pollution of the seas and oceans, to the contamination and damming of the rivers, and the massive destruction caused by the extraction of metals and minerals – these things impact all life.

Mother Earth is altered and destroyed by extensive modern human habitation.  She is altered and destroyed through mass unconscious consumerism.  She is altered and destroyed by the mass extraction of minerals including uranium, silver, and gold. These things alter the quality and quantity of water for all life.

Mother Earth is altered by the massive irresponsibility of humans, and this is speeding up climate change. Our modern society is unbalanced and is driven by instant gratification without regard for the future.

The entire O'odham way of life is based on water. Our ceremonies, songs, and dances all pay homage to water in the form of rain, clouds, and the water animals.  The O'odham continue to exist on this land.  We have been here for hundreds of thousands of years living in balance with Mother Earth. We are a natural part of the world, and we have an obligation to live in balance with Mother Earth.

The O’odham conduct offerings to the sea to raise the clouds, and then we prepare our seeds. We conduct our ceremonies and wait for the rains to come, and then we plant in the water ways all over the land. First the jegos, the great cleansing winds, will arrive; then the rains will come. We plant our seeds in the natural mouth of the desert washes, where water flows only after the rains. We also plant in natural flood areas. We greatly appreciate all the natural water holes, the springs, and the rivers that flow from the mountains. The natural water storage areas of our homelands are being impacted by industry and the great landscape altering that comes with it.

All the desert plants of my homeland live in balance with the water. The ha'san, the giant saguaro, waits for the rains and stores the water in her porous insides. She blooms and produces fruit for the O'odham to harvest, for the animals to eat, and for the sustenance of all life. Many greens like wild spinach, onions, and tubers come up on the land in days after the rain waters come to the lands. Animals such as the deer, the Bighorn Sheep, the Javalina, the Mountain Tortoise, and the Rabbit graze to their fill. The o’odham collect and dry the harvest so that it can be rehydrated to eat throughout the year. 

We consider the continuous destruction of our sacred water by modern society to be genocide against all life.  We, the people of conscience, must no longer allow this oppressive system to contaminate the water that is our life.  John Trudell said that "We are power," that we human beings have the essence of power.  With this power we can stop the destruction.


CONNECTING COMMUNITIES - Balance-Unbalance 2015 Welcoming Ceremonies from the Noosa Biosphere Reserve in Australia and remote pacific Islands in the Republic of Vanuatu. 

Gubbi Gubbi Dance - Noosa Biosphere Reserve, Australia 
WUNYA NGULUM (Welcome Everyone!) from the GUBBI GUBBI people of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia, the location of the 2013 Balance-Unbalance International Conference. 
Gubbi Gubbi Dance is a group of indigenous artists & performers from Queensland, Australia. Gubbi Gubbi (pronounced gub-bee) is the language spoken by the traditional custodians of the area. Lyndon Davis and Shannon Chilly, direct descendants of the Gubbi people, founded the troupe in 1996. Bringing together family members and local young indigenous people to celebrate the dances of their homelands. They have gained a strong rapport throughout their community taking great pride in their culture and feeling blessed to share their knowledge.

Gubbi Gubbi dance provide an unforgettable cultural experience. Their magical presentation of song and dance leaves the audience spellbound and has built them a reputation of being one of the most well renowned traditional aboriginal dance troupes in Southeast Queensland. 

Lyndon Davis says “Our lands stretched from Queensland’s Pine River in the south, to Burrum River in the north, Connondale ranges to the west. Our territories were bordered by mountain ranges and river systems. There were many clans within this vast area, approximately 20, numbering from 150 to 500 strong. All of these family groups shared this language, and would come together on a regular basis for special ceremonies, such as marriage, initiation, and especially festivals.” 

At Balance-Unbalance 2013, Lyndon Davis and Gubbi Gubbi Dance opened and closed the conference with a traditional Welcome to Country and cultural performance. In 2015, we are pleased to present a brief window into their rich cultural tradition with a welcoming performance on the banks of the Noosa River, at the exact location where we closed Balance-Unbalance 2013. 

This is an opportunity to continue the conversation and respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land where Balance-Unbalance travels for each conference. 
This short video performance prepared exclusively for Balance-Unbalance features Lyndon Davis, Brent Miller and Jessy Mckinless from Gubbi Gubbi Dance on the banks of the Noosa River. 

Jason Nez - Navajo Nation

Jason Nez is a member of the Navajo Nation, from Coalmine Mesa,  Arizona.  He has been working as an archaeologist for the past 11 years,  mostly in Northern Arizona and the 4 corners region.   He has worked for the Navajo Nation Archaeology Department,  the Musuem of Northern Arizona,  the National Park Service, and various cultural resource companies.  A 2004 graduate of Northern Arizona University (B. S.  Environmental Science)  he believes one of his duties as a scientist,  and a Native American,  is to share is knowledge with the public and especially to the public to raise awareness of Native American/First Nations cultural resource,  which would lead to a better understanding of Native American/First Nation issues.

Leweton Cultural Group, Republic of Vanuatu, South Pacific Islands 
Leweton Cultural Group hails from the remote tropical northern islands of Gaua and Merelava in Vanuatu, and live in a village in Espiritu Santo where they present, share, and maintain their unique cultural traditions and practises across cultures and generations. The Leweton Cultural Group has attracted attention from across the world with the mesmerising women’s water music and the energetic sounds of String band Matto. 

These remote Island communities are experiencing the true ramifications of climate change and at Balance-Unbalance we recognise the critical value of engaging with Indigenous knowledge systems in responding to climate change. 

The Leweton Cultural Group performing Vanuatu Women’s Water Music were a highlight for many at Balance-Unbalance 2013 in Australia and we have maintained an ongoing partnership to make sure remote coastal and island communities have a voice in global conversations around climate change. 

We are thrilled to include the Leweton Cultural Group in Balance-Unbalance 2015, with a Kastom Ceremony and Water Music performance conducted in Vanuatu especially for the opening of Balance-Unbalance 2015. This video also includes a welcoming message from Sandy Sur, a community leader from Vanuatu and the Leweton Cultural Group. 
 

Moderators
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lyndon Davis

Lyndon Davis

Gubbi Gubbi Dance
Gubbi Gubbi Dance is a group of indigenous artists & performers from Queensland, Australia. Gubbi Gubbi (pronounced gub-bee) is the language spoken by the traditional custodians of the area. Lyndon Davis and Shannon Chilly, direct descendants of the Gubbi people, founded the troupe in 1996. Bringing together family members and local young indigenous people to celebrate the dances of their homelands. They have gained a strong rapport... Read More →
avatar for Leweton Cultural Group

Leweton Cultural Group

Leweton is a community on the Island of Santo, Vanuatu. Leweton is a cultural experience that is made up of related families from 6 villages from the islands of Merelava and Gaua. Since 2008 we have been sharing our cultural experience with visitors from all around the world. We invite guests into our village lifestyle where they can experience our traditional way of life.  | | Our village is home to the unique and amazing magical water... Read More →
OR

Ofelia Rivas

Ofelia Rivas: Ofelia is the founder of the O’odham VOICE Against the WALL and the O’odham Cultural and Environmental Justice Coalition. She is a representative of the traditional O’odham elders and ceremony leaders, and has represented the O’odham at the World People's Summit on Climate Change in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and as part of the Zapatista La Otra Campaña. She led the successful fight to prevent a toxic waste dump near the... Read More →



Friday March 27, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy

12:15pm

Lunch/Networking Events - Nelson Plaza
Lunch served in Nelson Plaza

Friday March 27, 2015 12:15pm - 1:30pm
Nelson Plaza 51 East 10th Street Tempe, AZ

1:00pm

The Listening Path II: Disparate Times and Places
The Listening Path II: Disparate Times and Places uses the practice of soundwalking to connect people in disparate places in a unified act of silent respect for our natural surroundings. This project entails two short site-specific soundwalks--in Tempe, AZ, and in Grinnell, IA—and online documentation of these listening paths will juxtapose the diverse soundscapes of two iconic American landscapes: the desert and the prairie. This project blends the historically significant act of silent marches organized in the wake of tragedy with the creative research practice of soundwalking. In weaving together these themes, the project suggests that communities separated by time and place can practice collective silence to listen to the land, to demonstrate respect for our unique local environments, and to raise awareness of the extraordinary environmental challenges we face. Visit the project online: https://sites.google.com/site/thelisteningpathii/home.

Meet at the entrance of the School of Music, near Nelson Plaza. 
 

Speakers
AA

Abby Aresty

Sound artist Abby Aresty builds immersive, site-specific sound art installations in public spaces, creating unexpected, intentional, community listening contexts that examine the liminal spaces between our built environment and the natural world. Her recent work, Paths II: The Music of Trees, was featured in an interview with Melissa Block on NPR’s All Things Considered, and was hailed as ‘otherworldly,’ and ‘sometimes... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Virtual/Online

1:30pm

Session 1 Panel Stream: Environmental Data for Creative Projects and Community Engagement
Session 1 Panel Stream: Environmental Data for Creative Projects and Community Engagement

Kate Genevieve, Ian Winters, Andrea Polli and Leah Barclay: "Choreographies of Attention and Control: Climate Data, Networks and Visceral Experience in Installation and Performance"
The rapid proliferation of networked sensors and ubiquity of sensor data from mobile phones, game controllers and portable devices provide fresh possibilities for artists working with climate and environmental data at the intersection of performance, installation and networks. 

After the Snowden revelations on how individuals’ data is used, it seems that the great interpreters and choreographers of attention and control of our time may be government agencies and commercial interests. Data and its use is currently a resolutely political subject and a thoroughly emotional one. 

What can artists do in this terrain? 

This panel considers the visceral, emotional aspect of data and how artists are working with environmental data to explore emotional and visceral dimensions. It is clear that a real barrier to change - in the face of bleak climate research - is the inability to really feel what the data being shared might mean on a human and emotional level. How are artists using narrative, choreography, improvisation, and composition to handle data in imaginative and collaborative ways that allows people to listen, feel and understand on a personal, visceral level? And how vital is this work? 

This panel gathers together artists creatively exploring climate and environmental data, focusing on the different approaches, strategies and questions that they ask through their work. Using the idea of exploring data compositionally to create visceral effects as a point of departure, our roundtable hopes to open an informal discussion between practitioners and researchers working in the rich intersections of environmental work and performance/installation practice. 

The members of the panel work directly with these technological and compositional issues. The discussion is centered on a number of questions/provocations for discussion, posed to round table members to consider, both in the context of their own creative & technical practice, and through observations of others’ work. Through focusing on trans-disciplinary projects that combine creative vision, incisive data analysis and emotional reach, the panelists will consider what kind of effects ambitious creative work can have at this crisis point in human history. 

Our goal is to instigate an open discussion among round table members and audience about the opportunities and difficulties presented by using climate data to generate compositional material. 

How does the current expansion of the kinds of climate data made available in 2015 inflect your work? 
What implications does the ability to transform, across many media, the data extracted from environmental phenomenon have on the compositional process? 
How do you model and represent your work as it spans software, algorithm, choreography, sound and visual? 
If underlying compositional structures are being derived from environmental patterns, who is the ‘author’? 
Is the mobile phone sensor a special case in terms of facilitating collaboration, large scale participation and encouraging action and improvisation? 
How do you design how data effects the body?  

Mél Hogan, Laura Forlano, Liz Miller, Gisele Trudel, John Hopkins: "Performing Materialities: Water & Waste"
This panel brings together process-oriented audiovisual investigations engaging art, science and technology. The five panelists tend to the materiality of media, to water’s participation in processes that are of ecological concern and of ongoing social and cultural significance. Specifically, examining local/global sites–canals, waterways, bridges, islands, floods, sewage, waste water, shorelines, sea levels, droughts and deserts–this panel moves from the representational and relational (of media, labor, and institutionalized power) toward effective community action and social change. 

Filmmaker Liz Miller is the creator of The Shore Line, an online documentary that profiles educators, artists, architects, activists, scientists, city planners, and youth organizations from Canada, the U. S., Panama, India, and New Zealand, who are actively grappling with the balance-imbalance faced by coastal communities. Miller uses the online documentary format to instigate a critical dialogue about coastal squeeze, climate displacement, and rising sea levels. 

By way of performative audiovisual microevents, Gisèle Trudel exposes waste water systems presented in Canada, Germany and New Zealand. The research and production of this work (light, sweet, cold, dark, crude (LSCDC) (2008-on going)) originates in the « Eco Machines » system, pioneered by biologist and ecologist Dr. John Todd situated at the Vietnam Veteran’s War Memorial of Sharon, in Vermont, and the Station d’épuration des eaux usées, an industrial system for the city of Montreal, juxtaposed with images of the southwestern U.S. deserts. 

John C. Hopkins relies partially on a background in geophysics to guide his visual-sonic explorations of elemental energy flows. The author argues that the human organism’s impact on its proximal and distal environment—expressed through the techno-social system—may be better understood using the model of thermodynamics and entropy as a starting point. One simple, ongoing performance series “Changing the Course of Nature” demonstrates, onsite in the desert West of the US, how life at all levels expends the energy it consumes and thus changes ... everything. 

Laura Forlano and Mél Hogan (co-authors) use Goose Island, an artificial island in the North branch of the Chicago River, as their site of inquiry. The island’s history includes industrial plants as well as, more recently, corporate R&D facilities. With respect to water, a variety of “Smart City” projects that map underground tunnels and waterways as well as seek applications for so-called “green technologies” are scrutinized. Drawing on critical feminist technology studies, this project uses a camera with built-in GPS sensors to document the role of water in the economy, historically, and in the context of the present-day material labor of the city. 

Moderators
DQ

Douglas Quin

Described by the Washington Post as “the Audubon of audio,” Douglas Quin is a sound designer, naturalist, public radio commentator, educator, and music composer. For nearly 30 years, Quin has traveled widely, documenting the natural soundscape—from Antarctic ice to Arctic tundra and from African savannah to Amazon rainforest. His recordings of endangered and disappearing habitats represent one of the most... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
LF

Laura Forlano

Laura Forlano is an Assistant Professor of Design at the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology. From 2012-2013, she was a Visiting Scholar in the Comparative Media Studies program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research is focused on the intersection between emerging technologies, material practices and the future of cities. She is co-editor with Marcus Foth, Christine Satchell and Martin Gibbs of From... Read More →
KG

Kate Genevieve

Kate Genevieve is an artist and director of media art group CHROMA. CHROMA explore the flexible relationship between real and imagined worlds through trans-media events and immersive installation. Their site-specific projects range from light performances in Oxford’s Town Hall to largescale projections on Heritage castles and pop-up performances at London’s Science Museum. Their work has been shown nationally and internationally... Read More →
MH

Mél Hogan

Mél Hogan is a media scholar and graphic designer working as an Assistant Professor of Communication at IIT. Her recent publications and conference presentations look at internet materialities, archives, and surveillance — how infrastructures are made material, visible, and are embodied. As a practitioner, other issues of digital culture are addressed through media arts interventions and research design projects. She is also the... Read More →
JH

John Hopkins

John Hopkins is a media artist and learning facilitator. He holds a transdisciplinary creative practices PhD from La Trobe University/University of Technology Sydney, an MFA from the University of Colorado Boulder (where he studied with renown experimental film-maker, Stan Brakhage), and a BSc in Geophysical Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines. His trans-disciplinary research and workshops explore issues surrounding sustainable creative... Read More →
LM

Liz Miller

Liz Miller is a documentary maker and professor interested in new approaches to community collaborations and documentary as a way to connect personal stories to larger social concerns. Her documentary projects offer new and critical perspectives on gender, the environment, human rights, social movements and media. Liz teaches media production in Communications Studies at Concordia University (Montreal) and is an active member of the International... Read More →
AP

Andrea Polli

Andrea Polli is currently an Associate Professor of Art and Ecology with appointments in the College of Fine Arts and School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico.  She holds the Mesa Del Sol Endowed Chair of Digital Media and directs the Social Media Workgroup, a lab at the University's Center for Advanced Research Computing. She served as the founding Director of the Interdisciplinary Film and Digital Media Program and as... Read More →
GT

Gisèle Trudel

Gisèle Trudel is an artist. In 1996, she cofounded Ælab, an artistic research unit with Stéphane Claude, who is an electronic and electroacoustic composer and audio engineer. Ælab’s commitment to collaboration and creative dissemination are ways of thinking and doing that try to bridge different disciplines of inquiry. Their process-oriented investigations creatively engage art and technology as intertwined... Read More →
IW

Ian Winters

Ian Winters is an award-winning video and media artist working at the intersection of performance and time-based visual media to explore the relationships between physicality, technology, and place. Recent awards include 2013 residencies at Djerassi, Earthdance, Nexmap/CNM, 2013 ISEA-Sydney, a 2012 Leonardo LASER presenter, the 2013 LAD prize for video design, 2013 Isadora Duncan Award nominations for best visual design along with funding from... Read More →



Friday March 27, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Stauffer B125 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

1:30pm

Session 1 Paper stream 1: Building Sustainability Awareness in the Age of Climate Change
Session 1 Paper Stream 1: Building Sustainability Awareness in the Age of Climate Change

Rimjhin Aggarwal, Megha Budruk, Scott Bugental, Iris Drower, and Barbara Klimek: "Cross Cultural Exchanges Towards Global Change:  Engaging Youth with Food and Water Challenges"
The greatest challenge facing food security in the future is the aging of farm populations across the globe. As young people move to cities, and become increasingly disengaged from the processes of food production, how are we going to build the future of food to sustain us? The process of transition requires not just young farmers to replace the old, but a new generation of innovative problem solvers who can collaborate with a range of local to global partners to address the complex problems we face today. This paper will report on the activities of a global network that facilitates cross-cultural dialog among youth and provides them capacity building opportunities to take action on pressing food and water challenges in their local communities. The network has a membership of around 1600 individuals and/or organizations from around 36 countries. The flagship project of this network is a youth leadership-training workshop on agribusiness and sustainability, focusing specifically on African youth. Prior to the workshop, the participants are asked to conduct a needs assessment in their communities and formulate an initial project plan. Through mentoring by experts from various universities, government agencies, private sector and NGOs, cross-exchange with peers, facilitated discussion groups, and field trips to exemplary farms, the workshop enables youth to further develop their ideas into a potentially fundable plan. The workshop also provides various opportunities for cross-cultural exchanges through visual art, music, dance and story telling sessions. These cross-cultural exchanges enable participants to jointly explore their food traditions, and build alternative narratives and visions about the future of food. We provide several examples on how these exchanges can be a powerful tool in finding common ground and empowering participants to find their voice and build networks. An example of one of the experiences offered to participants is the interactive music and video show of Gandhi’s life. As participants become part of Gandhi’s journey of self-discovery and evolution as a leader, they are led to inquire into their own cultural roots and their innate leadership, and how these can be leveraged to develop their own action plans.


Ruth Wylie, Megan Halpern and Ed Finn: "An Artist, Author, and Expert Walk into a Bar: How Multidisciplinary Teams Tackle Global Challenges" 
Current global challenges such as food and energy shortages and sustainability cannot be solved without collaboration not only among multidisciplinary groups of experts, but also through large scale involvement with diverse publics. In this work, we present the methodology and outcomes of a three-day narrative hackathon to foster collaboration among diverse fields to produce stories for EVOKE, a massive multi-player online educational game that uses narrative to help players develop 21st century skills and drive collaborative innovation. EVOKE “agents” engage both online and in face-to-face social networks to complete missions to develop creative solutions to pressing global problems.In Fall 2014, the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University hosted a hackathon that united top science fiction writers, artists, futurists, and subject area experts to develop narratives and associated visual artworks surrounding these issues to add new materials to EVOKE’s fictional universe. The graphic art and narratives created will become springboards for future EVOKE games. Participants worked in multidisciplinary teams, with each team focusing on a specific global grand challenge, such as nuclear disarmament, food sustainability, and environmental sustainability. The hackathon provided a unique opportunity to explore how multidisciplinary teams collaborate and engage in the creative process, and observations revealed three themes around the concept of balance: (1) balance between structure and freedom, (2) balance between assigned roles and assumptions, and (3) balance between entertainment goals and educational goals. In balance between structure and freedom, we discuss the tension between providing specific goals and scaffolding to facilitate group interaction with the need for open-ended time to work. In exploring the balance between working within assigned roles and their underlying assumptions, we identify tensions surrounding expectations based on roles and titles and experiences in idea generation and development. Finally, we discuss issues surrounding developing a story with dual goals of entertaining and educating and explore how different teams tackled these at times, competing objectives. Finally, we close with a comparison of the EVOKE hackathon project to another multidisciplinary collaboration between a team of artists, a scientist, and a social scientist, to develop a performance about current research in materials science.


Alex Wier: "Björk's Biophilia Project: Building Ecological Awareness Through Music and Technology"
A prominent figure in popular music for over two decades, Björk has focused on natural elements and preservationist messages in her work and has engaged in public environmental activism. Her Icelandic upbringing helped her develop a deep connection with nature that is embodied in the themes of her music and her process of creating it. Björk’s compositional process uses sophisticated technological elements to create a vast sonic landscape that is inspired by the extreme and diverse geographical features of Iceland’s landscapes. 

Björk’s Biophilia is a recent multi-dimensional project that can be experienced as a music album, an interactive “app,” an educational program for children, and a live stage show. The introductory video to the “app” explains that the Biophilia experience aims at joining music, nature, and technology. It goes on to claim that “we are on the brink of a revolution that will re-unite humans with nature through new technological innovations.” Indeed in Biophilia, Björk unites music and nature through technology across the different platforms of the project. From the organically motivated process of musical composition to the exploration of natural and scientific themes in the innovative “app” and educational program, Biophilia encourages its audience to connect deeper with music, nature, and technology. The scope of the project seeks to excite and educate a wide audience on ecological topics and issues.

In this paper, I will provide a brief overview on how Björk incorporates natural elements in her artistic output. I will also demonstrate how her works act both as a sonic representation of Edward Wilson’s biophilia hypothesis and as a musical expression of the Norse pagan view of the continuity between humans and nature. I will then identify the specific musical, natural, and technological features of Biophilia and illustrate how they work together across the project’s platforms to form not only a unique and compelling multimedia artwork, but also an accessible and meaningful tool of environmental education. 

Moderators
FE

Frank Ekeberg

Frank Ekeberg is an artist and researcher primarily concerned with the sonic arts. His work explores issues of ecology, time, space, and memory. He uses almost exclusively natural sound as source material, and spatial aspects of the sounds and the listening environment are integrated as essential elements of the work. Ekeberg has composed and designed sound for concert performance, dance, film, theater, radio plays and intermedia installations... Read More →

Speakers
RA

Rimjhim Aggarwal

Dr. Aggarwal's research and teaching interests lie at the interface between sustainability science and international development. A central focus of her research has been on examining the links between globalization, resilience of social-ecological systems, and human well being. In current research she is examining the emerging conflicts in the framing of water as a human right as well as an economic, ecological and social good in rapidly... Read More →
MB

Megha Budruk

Dr. Megha Budruk is an Associate Professor in the Parks and Recreation Program at the School of Community Resources & Development, Arizona State University, USA. Trained in the natural and social sciences, Dr. Budruk's work is interdisciplinary in nature. She received her doctoral degree in Natural Resources from University of Vermont, USA, an MS in Recreation Management and Tourism from Arizona State University, USA, an MS in Environmental... Read More →
ID

Iris Drower

Iris Drower is an 'eclectic' collaborative educator and researcher with an international Ph.d. in Special Needs Education; a Masters in International Higher and Adult Education and a Bachelor of Education in both regular education and cross-categorial special needs learners. She has over two decades of experience in supervising, pre-servicing, instructing, planning curriculum, inclusion, and marketing quality education within linguistically... Read More →
EF

Ed Finn

Ed Finn is the founding director of the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, where he is an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and the Department of English. Ed’s research and teaching explore digital narratives, contemporary culture and the intersection of the humanities, arts and sciences. He is the co-editor of Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a... Read More →
MH

Megan Halpern

Megan Halpern is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, where she works with the Center for Science and the Imagination on “Emerge: Artists + Scientists Redesign the Future.” She earned her PhD in Science Communication at Cornell University. Her doctoral work focused on artist/scientist collaboration and the relationships between experts and publics, and... Read More →
BK

Barbara Klimek

Barbara Klimek became MSW Coordinator of the Master of Social Work Program of the School of Social Work in the College of Public Programs at Arizona State University in July 2009. She holds the MSW degree from Arizona State University, an MA degree in Economics, major: Econometrics from Warsaw School of Economics, Warsaw, Poland, and the Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.        ... Read More →
AW

Alex Wier

Alex Wier is a percussionist active in Arizona as both a performer and educator. Currently a doctoral student in percussion performance at Arizona State University, Wier serves as a Teaching Assistant with the responsibilities of teaching the Percussion Methods class and undergraduate percussion major lessons. Wier is also an adjunct instructor at Phoenix College. From 2012 to 2013 he was President of the Arizona Percussive Arts Society chapter.
RW

Ruth Wylie

Ruth Wylie is the assistant director of the Center for Science and the Imagination and an assistant research professor in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. Ruth earned her PhD in Human-Computer Interaction at Carnegie Mellon University in 2011 and her bachelor’s degree at the University of California, Berkeley in Cognitive Science with minors in Computer Science and Education. Ruth concentrates on interdisciplinary, translational... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy

1:30pm

Session 1 Paper Stream 2: Urban Water Sustainability, Rain, and Rivers
Session 1 Paper Stream 2: Urban Water Sustainability, Rain, and Rivers

Julianna Gwiszcz: "Water and/or Housing? Urban Political Ecology and Human Rights: A Framework for Urban Sustainability"
We are increasingly becoming an urbanized world, one in which half of the globe’s population is predicted to be comprised of city-dwellers over the course of this century (Rees et al. 2008). This is especially alarming when contemplating how rapid urbanization compromises sustainability, exacerbates global environmental change, and puts vulnerable urban dwellers at greater risk for human rights abuses. Where inequality looms largely in and between urban centers, among industrialized and developing countries alike, gains in urban growth under the guise of “sustainable development” benefit the few at the expense of the many. This has links to an unsustainable capitalist “growth” paradigm that equates progress with production and consumption and spurs human and natural resource exploitation. Thus, urbanization creates a complex predicament where the advancement of human rights and sustainability may appear at odds with one another. For example, failure to confront competing interests between fulfilling the human right to water and protecting this scarce resource jeopardizes human and environmental well-being. Considering these concerns, this conceptual paper addresses the following questions: How does an urban political ecology perspective enable us to think more critically about sustainability as a whole? What does a human rights framework add to an urban sustainability approach based on urban political ecology? Finally, what are potential strategies or mechanisms for change (i.e. social transformation) in implementing an urban sustainability model that unites an urban political ecology with a human rights perspective, and what challenges stem from such a model? The latter has particular implications for the role of cross-sector synergistic partnerships. I draw on two case examples to contextualize the discussion: water and housing insecurity in Sao Paulo, Brazil and Johannesburg, South Africa. Both cases evidence deep-seated obstacles to assuring access to water and housing—human rights enshrined in Brazil’s and South Africa’s constitutions—where inequality looms and overcrowding of urban regions compounds the negative impacts of drought and the degradation of already scarce water resources. These cases help demonstrate ways in which an urban political ecology that integrates a human rights framework enables us to better deconstruct the intricate intersections and potential conflicts between the realization of human rights and sustainability.

David Burraston: "Rainwire Prototype: An Environmental Sonification System"
Rainwire encompasses the cross-cultural investigation of rainfall & its application as a medium for artistic, cultural & scientific exchange. The Rainwire project includes development of a prototype Acoustic Rain Gauge using "long wire instruments", and subsequently expanded through various collaborations in a range of creative, cross-cultural & environmental contexts. Rainwire is an experimental approach to technological appropriation of agricultural based objects for art and science, with particular emphasis on climate change issues and agriculture. 

Long-wire instruments are made from spans of fencing wire across the open landscape. Rainwire developed from using recordings of rainfall ‘playing’ the long wire instruments for music compositions. This enabled a proof of concept study to the extent that the audio recordings demonstrate a wide variety of temporal & spatial rain event complexity. This suggests that environmental sonification has great potential to measure rainfall accurately, & address recognized shortcomings of existing equipment & approaches in meteorology. 

Rain induced sounds with long wire instruments have a wide range of unique, audibly recognisable features. All of these sonic features exhibit dynamic volume & tonal characteristics, depending on the rain type & environmental conditions. Aside from the vast array of creative possibilities, the high spatial, temporal, volume & tonal resolution could provide significant advancement to knowledge of rainfall event profiles, intensity & microstructure. The challenge lies in identifying distinctive sound patterns & relating them to particular types of rainfall events. 

Rainwire is beyond simple sonification of data, it embeds technology & data collection within cultural contexts. With rainfall as catalyst to draw inspiration from Indigenous, natural, & artificial complex systems, artists & cultural groups are key to informing science & incite new creative modalities. At the culmination of the project it is envisaged the prototype technology will be ready for adaptation to a range of cultural contexts such as developing nations, & their water management, agriculture, weather/ecosystem monitoring industries. 

Previous work on Rainwire has been conducted on shared instruments; this paper presentation will provide details, reports and reflections on the newly built dedicated Rainwire prototype and collaborations, and include audio examples / images.

Leah Barclay: "River Listening: Creative Approaches to Aquatic Bioacoustics in Australian River Systems"
In our current state of environmental crisis, biodiversity assessment is critical to understanding the rapid ecological changes taking place across the globe. In the last ten years, there has been a strong emergence of non-invasive monitoring involving auditory recordings of the environment. This emerging field is commonly referred to as soundscape ecology and shares many parallels with other fields, including bioacoustics and acoustic ecology. These fields have an array of creative possibilities that have been deeply explored by practitioners including Bernie Krause, Ros Bandt and Garth Paine. There are now a growing number of international projects embracing auditory monitoring in aquatic environments. 

River Listening is a practice-led research collaboration between independent artist Dr. Leah Barclay and the Australian Rivers Institute to explore new methods for acoustically monitoring four Queensland river systems: the Brisbane River, the Mary River, the Noosa River and the Logan River. The initial phase of the project has involved listening labs, field recording, sound maps, performances and installations to experiment with hydrophonic recording, virtual technologies and community engagement in understanding river health and aquatic biodiversity. This paper will introduce the creative foundations of River Listening and highlight the preliminary outcomes from the field research conducted in Queensland throughout 2014. 

As the international interest in the emerging auditory fields of bioacoustics and acoustic ecology continues to expand, there are clear opportunities to harness virtual technologies to develop accessible community engagement around the creative and scientific possibilities of listening to the environment. River Listening provides a model to develop a truly interdisciplinary approach at the critical stage of creative development and it is anticipated the future results will be beneficial to national ecosystem monitoring programs. This project is a catalyst for community engagement and interdisciplinary thinking at a time when the conservation and management of aquatic ecosystems is a critical priority. River Listening fundamentally explores the creative possibilities of aquatic bioacoustics and the potential for new approaches in the management and conservation of global river systems. 

Moderators
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
DB

David Burraston

David Burraston is an artist/scientist involved in technology and electronic music since the late 1970s. He had an innovative role in the foremost UK telco’s R&D laboratory (BT Research Laboratories) in diverse areas such as Artificial Life, Complex Systems, Virtual Reality, Spatial Audio and Information Visualisation. He was part of the team that designed and built 'The Wires' installations at The WIRED Lab. His PhD thesis developed... Read More →
JG

Julianna Gwiszcz

Julianna Gwiszcz is a Sociocultural Anthropology Ph.D. student at Arizona State University (ASU). She earned her Masters of Science in Social Work from Columbia University, where she specialized in youth development and international social development. | | Julianna’s research explores the synergies and conflicts between social and ecological wellbeing in the context of sustainability. In particular, she is interested in different... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Stauffer B103 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

1:30pm

Session 1 Paper Stream 3: Acoustic Ecology and Virtual Places
Session 1 Paper Stream 3: Acoustic Ecology and Virtual Places

Brandon Mechtley: "Acoustic Ecology in the Age of Listening Machines: Quantitative Metrics for Holistic Soundscape Characterization"
The study of acoustic ecology is concerned with the manner in which life interacts with its environment as mediated through sound. As such, a central focus is that of the soundscape: the acoustic environment as perceived by a listener. R. Murray Schafer described the challenge of studying the soundscape as follows: "To give a totally convincing image of a soundscape would involve extraordinary skill and patience: thousands of recordings would have to be made, tens of thousands of measurements would have to be taken, and a new means of description would have to be devised." With modern advances in computing and storage, many of these challenges seem to be less daunting, but care must be taken to ensure that we understand the implications of the metrics we use to represent and classify soundscapes. Techniques in computational auditory scene analysis and bioacoustics allow for large-scale passive acoustic monitoring efforts, but many focus on the analysis of specific types of acoustic events, often separated from their context. This paper will provide an overview of several quantitative metrics and computational methods that can assist in holistic studies of soundscapes and will discuss several possible applications and directions for experimental design.

Emmanuel Galvan Martinez: "Mexican Changing Soundscapes: The Potential of Acoustic Ecology and Sound Inclusive Art to Create Social and Environmental Awareness in Mexico"
We, as a society, have created an environment full of sonic imprints and, whether we realize it or not, contribute actively to its contents. Sound, along with other cultural factors, forms a latent aural print of our existence in a particular space, offering in this way the possibility to better understand the places we inhabit. By challenging the predominating visual approach of society, sound can force the listener to experience reality in a more intimate way. The sonic richness of Mexican culture and its identity provides an interesting opportunity for acoustic ecology and other sound inclusive disciplines to convey and express meaningful messages of social and environmental awareness. This paper considers the relationship between the sonic identity of a location and the power of sound to transmit meaning, and to explore the possibilities of using acoustic ecology and other sonic inclusive artworks to create environmental and social awareness in Mexico. The author’s artistic perspective and two specific case studies are used to provide a discussion on how Mexican sound-inclusive art holds the potential to reinforce a deeper understanding of some of the country’s current and most significant environmental and social issues. 

Phylis Johnson and Jay Jay Jegathesan: "Hearing in Numbers: Virtual Sound as Next Nature" 
As we become increasingly interconnected with technology, we lose track of our physical reference points. One of the last frontiers of virtual worlds is sound, returning full circle to the primacy of aurality as noted in the work of Atwood, McLuhan, Lacey, Ong, Schafer, and others. This discussion considers how sonification is an utopian concept for explaining and creating immersive experiences within virtual worlds, as well as the dystopian downbeat to our reliance on technology. Within such spaces, acoustic designers increasingly quantify the varying sonic levels of objects and environments, and spatially arrange them to reflect human hearing (acknowledging variations in individual aural perception as well as variables impacting environmental acoustics as much as possible). When creating an acoustic environment within a virtual realm, one accounts for these nuances in establishing an emotive connection to the listeners. 

Is it possible to design a virtual world that replicates real life to the extent aural senses are confounded, and what are the social implications of blurring worlds? This paper/presentation investigates the significance and potential consequences of quantifying aural experiences, by recording, archiving and calculating them for placement within an artificial environment. Object sonification, to some extent, has been employed in experimental research directed at helping visually impaired persons to "see" their surroundings acoustically, using strategically placed sonic data. On the other hand, is there a point where technology and nature might become assimilated, and isn't that happening now - a second nature of sound? 

A 2007 essay reprinted on Koert van Mensvoort 's web site "What is Next Nature" by Joop de Boer ("Spatial Planning: Learning from Second Life), called attention to the entertainment value of reimagined/recreated environments. This presentation continues the discussion several years later, with a focus on acoustic ecology in virtual worlds given the push toward recruiting sound engineers by Linden Lab, the creator of Second Life. 

The authors report on lessons learned from an-ongoing university partnership (USA-Australia) that explores applications of sound archival and design within virtual environments, using dedicated space in Second Life as a site of experimentation and "Sound Art & Practice" course instruction.  

Moderators
KS

Kotoka Suzuki

Kotoka Suzuki is a composer focusing on both multimedia and instrumental practices. She has produced several large-scale multimedia works, including spatial interactive audio-visual work for both concert and installation settings, often in collaboration with artists and scholars from other disciplines.  Her work reflects on life, breath and wind, and often conceives of sounds as physical forms to be manipulated through the sculptural... Read More →

Speakers
JJ

Jay Jay Jegathesan

Jay Jay Jegathesan, PhD Candidate, is Manager of the School of Physics at the University of Western Australia. He is also the Sim Founder/Owner of University of Western Australia SL, where he has established several international university and organization partnerships virtually and has hosted/sponsored an on-going series of creative art and machinima projects.
PJ

Phylis Johnson

Dr. Phylis Johnson is Professor of Sound & New Media in the College of Mass Communication & Media Arts at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. She is Editor of Soundscape: The Journal of Acoustic Ecology and the Editor of The Journal of Radio and Audio Media. She has written four books (see Amazon.com) in media studies, as well as chapters and articles dealing with issues in sound and new media. She operates a sim within Second... Read More →
EG

Emmanuel Galvan Martinez

Sound Artist. | | Born in Guadalajara, Mexico, Emmanuel was awarded a bachelors degree in sound production (School for Audio Engineering - SAE Institute, Sydney) in 2011 and a masters in creative industries, with a major in music & sound (Queensland University of Technology) in 2013. | | His work investigates the interactions between people, places and sound; the creative possibilities of using technology to interact with the sound... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Art 246 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

3:00pm

Walk to Tempe Town Lake
Walk down Mill Avenue to Tempe Beach Park for the performance of Maritime Rites on the Tempe Town Lake

Friday March 27, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Music School Foyer 50 E. Gammage Parkway Tempe, AZ 85281

3:30pm

Alvin Curran: Maritime Rites (Performance on Tempe Town Lake)
Maritime Rites is a site-specific work to be performed on and near bodies of water, harbors, rivers, or lakes, featuring musicians in boats as well as sounds of water, ship horns, bird song and other acoustic properties of the outdoor environment. Maritime Rites exists in many different versions and has been adapted to many beautiful sites all over the world, such as lakes in Rome, Berlin, New York City’s Central Park and in Chicago, rivers in London, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, and Sydney Harbour, and now in the desert setting of Tempe, Arizona.

Performers:

Trombone
Emmy Rozanski
Adam Dixon
Hannah Raschko
Garrett Haas
Tim Hutchens

Percussion
Alex Wier
Alex Fragiskatos
Eric Retterer

Flute
Eyona Matthews
Amanda Ruzek
Chaz Salazar

Saxophone
Joe Finkel
Aaron Lockhart 

Speakers
AC

Alvin Curran

Alvin Curran is an internationally renowned and award-winning American composer who has received much recognition for compositions involving unconventional instruments, unusual performance situations and sites, and live-electronic improvisations. | | As part of Balance-Unbalance 2015, Curran will give a keynote and direct one of his signature compositions Maritime Rites on Tempe Town Lake on 27 March. | | Democratic, irreverent, and... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Tempe Town Lake Tempe, AZ

6:00pm

PechaKucha
MC: Roger Malina

Speaker 1
: Roger Malina
Two years ago we opened the ArtSciLab in the Art, Technologyand Emerging Communication at the University of Texas atDallas. I will briefly present our two project areas: a ) DataDramatisation Research and b) Experimental Publishingand Knowledge Curation. In the first I will present our collaborationwith neurobiologist Gagan Wig developing a data stethoscopefor brain connectome data. In second I will present ourCreative Disturbance art-sci platform we are developing podcastsas a form of professional publication.

Speaker 2: Prasad Boradkar - Co-Director of the Biomimicry Center, ASU 

Speaker 3: Glenn Weyant - Playing the US-Mexico fence


Performance
Glisten of Places
by Matthew Burtner
Percussionist Jeremy Muller will perform Matthew Burtner’s piece entitled Glisten of Places for percussion and geotagged soundscape recordings. Muller commissioned Burtner, an Alaskan-born composer, to compose a work based on the extreme climates of the Arizona desert and the Alaskan tundra. He created a piece that uses a collection of field recordings as backdrop soundscapes to the percussion part. The percussion part performs the field recordings’ corresponding GPS locations translated into specific rhythms. As a listener, one could decode the rhythms as GPS coordinates and discover that they are listening to how that particular location, on earth, sounds. The performer plays different triangles representing north, south, east, & west, based on the current GPS location of the soundscape being heard. Also, gongs are used as the Northern/Southern hemispheres and specific locations are played on the gongs to indicate exactly where on the planet these recordings took place. An option in the score is to use cameras to overlay images of the earth and projected onto a screen. The audience could then see the performer playing the map, showing them where the recordings were made. The work received its world premiere on December 1, 2014. 

Speaker 4: Ofelia Rivas - O'odham elder - on water and life 

Speaker 5: Thomas Puleo - Do plants have rights, and if so, what is a vegan to do?

Speaker 6: Ricardo Dal Farra - Balance-Unbalance project


E2Earth - musical performance for http://eartotheearth.org


Speaker 7: Dr. Ken Sweat: Climate Reality Leader 
In 2006, Nobel Laureate and former U.S. Vice President Al Gore got the world talking about climate change with the Academy Award-winning film An Inconvenient Truth. It was just the beginning of a climate revolution, and later that year, he founded The Climate Reality Project to take the conversation forward and turn awareness into action. The Climate Reality Project is a diverse group of passionate individuals who have come together to help solve the greatest challenge of our time. They are cultural leaders, marketers, organizers, scientists, storytellers and more, and we are committed to building a better future together.

Today, we know climate disruption is the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced. And we know carbon pollution is to blame. But at Climate Reality, we also know that solutions are right in front of us. We can create a healthy, sustainable, and prosperous future by making a global shift from dirty fossil fuels to clean, renewable energies like solar and wind. Our leaders aren’t going to do it on their own. So we’re bringing millions together to make them, demanding change with a collective voice so loud and forceful they have no choice but to help shape the clean-energy future we need. 

The Climate Reality Leadership Corps is a global network of activists committed to taking on the climate crisis and solving what is far and away the greatest challenge of our time. The program takes great leaders and makes them exceptional, providing the training in climate science, communications, and organizing to tell the story of climate change and inspire communities everywhere to take action. The result is a dynamic group of world-changers shaping the conversation on climate in forums from family dinners to international summits and building a 21st-century movement for solutions. At Balance-Unbalance 2015, we are happy to host local Climate Reality leader Dr. Ken Sweat, an experienced biologist whose previous work includes natural resource consulting, endangered species surveys and ecotourism ventures.  

Performance: Rainwire by Dave Burraston
Rainwire encompasses the cross-cultural investigation of rainfall & its application as a medium for artistic, cultural & scientific exchange. The project includes the development of a prototype Acoustic Rain Gauge using "long wire instruments", and its subsequent expansion through various collaborations in a range of creative, cross-cultural & environmental contexts. This performance will present a live laptop mix of environmental sonification recordings from the newly built Rainwire prototype. Previous work on Rainwire has been conducted on shared instruments; this performance will be an opportunity to present the newly built dedicated Rainwire prototype in public for the first time.

Long-wire instruments are made from spans of fencing wire across the open landscape. Rainwire was developed from using recordings of rainfall ‘playing’ the long wire instruments for music compositions. This enabled a proof-of-concept study to the extent that the audio recordings demonstrate a wide variety of temporal & spatial rain event complexity. This suggests that environmental sonification has great potential to measure rainfall accurately, & address recognized shortcomings of existing equipment & approaches in meteorology.
Rain-induced sounds with long wire instruments have a wide range of unique, audibly recognisable features. All of these sonic features exhibit dynamic volume & tonal characteristics, depending on the rain type & environmental conditions. These unique sound properties can take many forms such as high to low frequency crackles & swept zaps, similar to sounds produced by a sound synthesizer. Aside from the vast array of creative possibilities, the high spatial, temporal, volume & tonal resolution could provide significant advancement to knowledge of rainfall event profiles, intensity & microstructure.

Rainwire is beyond simple sonification of data. It embeds technology & data collection within cultural contexts. With rainfall as the catalyst to draw inspiration from Indigenous, natural, & artificial complex systems, artists & cultural groups are the key to informing science & inciting new creative modalities. At the culmination of the project it is envisaged the prototype technology will be ready for adaptation to a range of cultural contexts, such as developing nations, their water management, agriculture, and weather/ecosystem monitoring industries. 

Moderators
RM

Roger Malina

Distinguished Professor of Art and Technology, University of Texas
Roger F. Malina is an astronomer and editor. He is a Distinguished Professor of Art and Technology at the University of Texas,  Dallas where he is developing Art-Science R and D and Experimental publishing research. Former  Director of the Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille Provence. His specialty is in space instrumentation; he was the Principal Investigator for the NASA Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite at the University of... Read More →

Speakers
DB

David Burraston

David Burraston is an artist/scientist involved in technology and electronic music since the late 1970s. He had an innovative role in the foremost UK telco’s R&D laboratory (BT Research Laboratories) in diverse areas such as Artificial Life, Complex Systems, Virtual Reality, Spatial Audio and Information Visualisation. He was part of the team that designed and built 'The Wires' installations at The WIRED Lab. His PhD thesis developed... Read More →
RD

Ricardo Dal Farra

Dr. Ricardo Dal Farra is professor of electroacoustic music and media arts at Concordia University, Canada and director of the Electronic Arts Research Centre (CEIArtE) at the National University of Tres de Febrero, Argentina. | | He has been director of Hexagram, the Centre for Research-Creation in Media Arts and Technologies, Canada; researcher on electroacoustic music and media arts history for UNESCO, France; director of the Multimedia... Read More →
JM

Jeremy Muller

Jeremy Muller is an innovative percussionist dedicated to exploring the confluence of technology and modern performance. He has presented performances, papers, and masterclasses at many venues throughout North America, including Banff, Alberta, First Fridays in Phoenix, the International Symposium on Latin American Music, the Musical | Instrument Museum, and PASIC in Louisville, Columbus, Austin, and Indianapolis. In 2014, Jeremy became a... Read More →
TP

Thomas Puleo

Thomas J Puleo is an assistant professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University. A geographer by training, he studies the roles that landscapes play in the resilience of places at multiple scales (personal, municipal, national, global). Because landscapes mediate multiple processes (economic, political, social, cultural, historical, technological, environmental), he takes a transdisciplinary approach to... Read More →
OR

Ofelia Rivas

Ofelia Rivas: Ofelia is the founder of the O’odham VOICE Against the WALL and the O’odham Cultural and Environmental Justice Coalition. She is a representative of the traditional O’odham elders and ceremony leaders, and has represented the O’odham at the World People's Summit on Climate Change in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and as part of the Zapatista La Otra Campaña. She led the successful fight to prevent a toxic waste dump near the... Read More →
GW

Glenn Weyant

Glenn Weyant is a Tucson-based folk listener and a founding member of the early 21st Century Border Wall Deconstructionist Movement. For two decades Weyant has chronicled the Sonoran Desert soundscape via soundwalks, field recordings and performance. In borderland performances, a keystone of Weyant’s work includes amplifying and playing walls, militarized infrastructure and migrant ephemera with a cello bow and implements of mass... Read More →



Friday March 27, 2015 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy

6:00pm

Art Exhibit: Old Graduate Sculpture Studio
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm, March 22-29. 

Fecundity
Bob Vanderbob

Fecundity: 1. the ability to cause or assist healthy growth; 2. the ability to produce offspring; 3. the creative power of the mind or imagination

Will the fecundity of our minds come to the rescue of biological fecundity? Will we collapse and go extinct, or adapt, survive and thrive? It is a delicate balance.

On one hand, the natural systems that sustain human activity are stretched to their limit. Biodiversity is dwindling. We humans are increasingly prey to fertility problems, due to the accumulation of pollution in our bodies. On the other, our understanding of biosystems is exploding. We are decoding nature’s fundamental processes at an accelerating pace with the help of the exponential rise in computing power. 

Whereas our ancestors conjured up potent fertility deities associated with pregnancy, birth, life, rainfall, harvest, love, sex and beauty, the dry and abstract vocabulary we use today in relation to fecundity is not exactly rousing: 'the environment', 'sustainability', 'biodiversity'...

With this installation, Bobvan proposes a mythological, poetic experience, a revitalization of the age-old archetype encompassing the nested metaphorical meanings of the notion of fecundity to include the agility of the mind and the potential of the imagination. 

The installation is inspired by a Neolithic fecundity figure found in Harappa, in the Indus Valley.

A 3D-printed female figure in unsmoothed low-poly, a metaphor for the human species as an ongoing work in progress, is balanced on her head. She becomes a screen onto which are projected images of life, energy, water, bacteria, sperm and ovules, electronic patterns, genetic and binary code. The modern-day 'power' icon is projected onto her skull, reminiscent of Neolithic representations of the vulva, a universal fecundity symbol. In stark contrast, images of desert landscapes in video negative and of Venus, Earth's barren sister planet, are projected onto the back wall. The whole installation is enshrined in a large mirror box, evoking the ongoingness of the universe-as-process by reflecting the fecundity figure ad infinitum in all directions. 

Fecundity is part of Bobvan's Artificial Mythology project; it is presented at Balance-Unbalance as a world premiere. 

ArtLAB Mobile ECO-STUDIO

Mobile Eco Studio is a social art project involving artist-led workshops, planting indigenous species in unused bits of land. It integrates indigenous culture, biology, and community engagement, and adds a unique approach to the related subjects of climate and culture. Its special relationship to the climate and culture of Arizona will help visitors at the conference become more familiar with this unique place and ecosystem.


Speakers
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →

Artists
BV

Bob Vanderbob

Bob Vanderbob, a.k.a. Bobvan, is an artist and composer based in Brussels (Belgium). He explores the interaction between art, mythology, science, and science-fiction to convey his poetic vision of the techno-human condition. He calls his project Artificial Mythology, a matrix of mythological modules, a modern myth-scape for the current context of technological acceleration.
DA

Desert ArtLAB

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary initiative dedicated to a public art practice exploring connections between ecology, technology, and community. Through multimedia performance, food practice, and visual and social art, desert ArtLAB seeks to inform a discourse of desert urban landscapes, while challenging residents to consider how native ecology can inform identity, equality and resilience in our desert culture and... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Old Graduate Sculpture Studio 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Balance-Unbalance 2015: EcoQuantum 2.0
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm March 22-29.

Robotanic Mobile Gardens--Soybots III
Shannon McMullen & Fabian Winkler

Climate, energy, agriculture, politics: the project Robotanic Mobile Gardens – SoyBots III belongs to a series of art installations and discursive interventions, collectively focused on critical gardening strategies which demonstrate just how deeply entangled these conditions are. In the global context, soybean production is at the heart of both climate change problems and suggested solutions to food security issues. Thus, soybean plants are mobilized for their significance to global food production, their strong association with a hybridity between nature and technology —in this case as a result of biotechnological strategies for increasing crop yields through genetic modification—and vulnerability to changing climate and water conditions as a result of global warming. 

Gardens express ideas and social relations; some are sites where art and technology produce material realities, social narratives and visualize politics. In this case, mobile gardens unite code, robotics and soybean plants (robotanics) to create a speculative interactive installation that suggests questions about climate, place and agriculture implicated in contemporary practices and values. As self-pollinating organisms in combination with a light-seeking mobile robotic platform, temperature and moisture sensors, soybean plants metaphorically address the evolving interdependence between humans and cultivated crops and the underlying political nature of photosynthesis. 

These relationships are expressed through three autonomous robotic platforms, outfitted with custom planter boxes containing soybean plants, that roam interior space in search of optimal light conditions and ideal temperatures while monitoring soil moisture to promote plant growth in local conditions. To identify optimal light conditions, the robot host employs a phototropic control strategy, using sensors to track and follow sunlight intensity or to locate LED grow lights. Moisture sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller trigger a flashing yellow light when moisture levels are too low, prompting humans to attend to the plants. Finally, temperature sensors are similarly used to allow the soybeans to indicate their need for increased or decreased warmth. ‘Shivering’ indicates a need for higher temperatures. In contrast, the robot will seek dimmer locations when it is too warm. With SoyBots III, soybeans become an ‘evocative object’ (Turkle, 2011) – something that can provoke reflection, speculation and attract emotion.  

Resounding Mulgrave
John Mackay, John Wedgwood Clarke, Tariq Emam

Resounding Mulgrave explores the post-industrial landscape of Port Mulgrave, north of Scarborough, UK. It was one of three artistic interventions exploring and reinterpreting the Rotunda Museum, Scarborough (created by the father of modern geology, William Smith). It was commissioned by Scarborough Museums Trust as part of the Dictionary Stone project curated by Lara Goodband, and supported by Arts Council, England. 

The work was a collaboration between poet John Wedgwood Clarke and sound artist Rob Mackay, with technical and artistic support from Tariq Emam (video/performance). 

"There’s a fossil shell by my foot the colour and texture of grey opaque glass, perfectly moulded, complete with a scallop’s bow and ridges. Right next to it, but 183 million years later, there’s a limpet. The gap in time between the two doesn’t seem to exist, but I know that it does."(John Wedgwood Clarke) 

This awareness of the silent, pre-human gap between our present and geological past motivated our exploration of the coast between Port Mulgrave and Staithes. We used words and sound, both found and structured, to play within this silence and make connections between the ‘pastoral’, the ‘sublime’, and the history that has flowed from the smelting of the ironstone for which this stretch of the North Yorkshire coast is geologically famous. 

Our lives and cultures are shaped by the rocks under the soil. Our post-industrial ruins are part of the on-going geology as well as history of the area: the mine workings between Port Mulgrave and Staithes are fossil burrows in the making. We hope that we’ve evoked something of this haunting place, and the way it provokes awareness that we’re a species among other species, dangling by a thread. 

This work was originally installed at Scarborough’s Rotunda Museum from 5th June - 14th July 2014. It consisted of an 8-channel sound installation, a 6-screen video installation, and 2 display cases containing rock and fossil specimens, along with 6 small-screen video loops.

Words for Water
Tracey Benson

Words for Water explores a diversity of languages, including Indigenous Australian languages, as a starting point to evoke a connection to water as the sustaining element of all life. Indigenous cultures have an acute understanding of and connection to the relationship between body, environment (site) and identity, and this project seeks to awaken this connection more broadly across cultures and practices.

Words for Water is an exploration into the many aspects of the chemical of H2O. Water makes up over 70 percent of the human body; it is essential for sustaining life and has massive social and cultural significance.

Water may seem ubiquitous, but it has some rather uncommon properties. At the atomic level, water can influence how life and landscapes are formed, such as how water moves through a plant and how rivers meander around bends. It is also the only chemical that be formed in three states – vapour, liquid and solid.

This project uses a range of mixed reality media approaches – the use of augmented media to ‘trigger’ sound and video, the development of a smart phone/tablet app, gallery and installation based exhibitions, and a projection work that bring this project together in a filmic, linear narrative.

Words for Water is seen as an ever-expanding project, allowing for infinite expansion of words, thoughts and stories related to water. The project has appeared at SCANZ2015, New Plymouth, New Zealand; Photoacess, October 2014; 3WDS14, Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium, March 2014; and Stage One of Words for Water was presented as part of the Transreal Topologies exhibition at the Royal Institute of Science in Adelaide, October 2013, held in conjunction with the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR).


Artists
FW

Fabian Winkler

Fabian Winkler is an artist working at the intersections of the moving image, sound, spatial structures and robotics. He explores the aesthetic potential and the cultural implications of seemingly well-known artifacts through the use of new technologies. Conceptually, his works are often influenced by archeological research into the history of technology and observations of social processes. Winkler is currently an Associate Professor of Visual... Read More →
JW

John Wedgwood Clarke

Dr. John Wedgwood Clarke lectures in creative writing at the University of Hull. In 2012-13 he was Leverhulme Poet in Residence in the marine biology department at the University of Hull. He regularly works with curators, scientists and artists on public art projects, and is currently completing an Arts Council-funded writing project about rubbish. His first full collection, Ghost Pot (2013), was described as ‘a masterpiece that deserves... Read More →
RM

Rob Mackay

Rob Mackay is a composer, sound artist and performer. Currently, he is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Music Technology at the University of Hull. He is the director of the ‘Sounds of Our Surroundings’ research group (http://icpcluster.org/page/sounds-of-oursurroundings). | | Prizes and honours include: IMEB Bourges (1997 and 2001); EAR99 from Hungarian Radio (1999); Confluencias (2003); and La Muse en Circuit (2004 and 2006). His... Read More →
SM

Shannon McMullen

Shannon McMullen is a jointly appointed Assistant Professor in the Electronic and Time-Based Art Program in the School of Visual and Performing Arts and in American Studies at Purdue University. She received a PhD in sociology from the University of California, San Diego, in 2007. Based on her fieldwork experience and dissertation writing in the areas of visual and material culture, Dr. McMullen has developed a creative practice that... Read More →
TE

Tariq Emam

Tariq Emam is researching towards a PhD in Music by Composition at the University of Hull, having been awarded one of the institution’s first interdisciplinary PhD scholarships. He is working with the soundscape of the Yorkshire Dales, grounding his work on an archive of sounds recorded there 40 years ago. By merging old and new data, he aims to develop a soundscape monitoring system that evokes both the natural and anthropogenic... Read More →
TB

Tracey Benson

Tracey Benson is a green geek/artist/researcher into connected communities, UX, WCAG, Gov.2.0, sustainability, tech/art synergies, maps and FOSS. Tracey has been active in a number of media arts communities: in 2007, she co-founded the Canberra chapter of dorkbot with Alexandra Gillespie and was also a moderator on the internationally renowned new media list –empyre- from 2005-07. She has participated in many international digital media... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Grant Street Atrium 605 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

7:00pm

Night Gallery
The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 

Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution governance in Southern Louisiana. The work revisits the contact between the oil indu…


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
CC

Cecily Culver

Cecily Culver is a maker and experiment conductor; her sculptural works and immersive environments exist in the space between the ephemeral and the tangible.<><>This translation of thoughts began in her hometown of Rochester, New York, where she completed her BFA at<>Rochester Institute of Technology in interdisciplinary studio art. Culver is currently exploring the natural and man-made oddities of Phoenix, Arizona. She is... Read More →
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
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Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281

7:15pm

Reception, ASU Art Museum
Opening Address: Heather Landes, Director of ASU School of Music
Opening Address: Gordon Knox, Director of ASU Art Museum


Inlets
by John Cage

Performed by the ASU Percussion Studio
Simone Mancuso Director, Danielle Moreau, Alex Wier, Alexandros Fragiskatos, Neil Hathaway, 


Composed in 1977, this work was originally used as music for the eponymous choreographed piece by Merce Cunningham, with stage decor and costume design by Morris Graves. It was used again in 1983 for the Cunningham work entitled Inlets 2, with stage design by Mark Lancaster. In this work, players are instructed to tip amplified conch shells of varying sizes that have been partially filled with water in order to produce gurgling sounds. The work also calls for the sound of burning pine cones (live or recorded) and a single tone produced on a conch shell, used as a trumpet. The work was part of the “Sounday” event. This work exemplifies Cage’s interest in "contingency", in his definition meaning "improvisation using elements in which there is a discontinuity between cause and effect." 


Restless Mjøsa........................Stephan Moore and Scott Smallwood
Two improvising computer musicians, Stephan Moore and Scott Smallwood, manipulate field recordings collected in February 2014 in Hamar, Norway, along the lakefront and in the town. Their performance engages aural memory, as they attempt to distill an impression of the environment through a selective layering of their recorded sounds.  


Shifting Nature (2012) 
........................Leah Barclay
Leah Barclay has composed an electroacoustic performance piece based on environmental field recordings made during her Sound Mirrors project, in which she travelled through Australia, India, Korea, China and Brazil capturing the sounds of significant rivers and collaborating with their surrounding communities. The source materials range from hydrophone recordings of the Amazon River Dolphin in central Brazil to pilgrims chanting at dusk on the banks of the Pamba in southern India. Shifting Nature explores rivers as the lifeblood of communities and underscores the value of listening in our current state of ecological uncertainty, weaving diverse cultural and natural soundscapes into a dense and unpredictable sonic environment.
www.leahbarclay.com

Hydatos (2012) ........................ João Pedro Oliveira 
Hydatos is a greek word that means “water”.
This piece is inspired on the first verses of the Old Testament (Genesis Chapter 1:2)
“And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.”
The video part relates to the theme of water in an abstract and concrete way, sometimes suggesting water images, sometimes suggesting metaphors. The audio part was synthesized and uses several abstract references to water sounds. The work has been performed in several festivals and concerts in Europe, Asia, North and South America
 www.jpoliveira.com
 

Speakers
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
SM

Simone Mancuso

Simone Mancuso, percussionist and conductor, was born and raised in Italy. He has been internationally recognized for his interpretations of contemporary classical pieces with prizes including the Kranichstein-Stipendienpreise from the Internationales Musikinstitut Darmstadt in 2002 and the First Prize from the Stockhausen Stiftung für Musik in 2005, which was awarded to Mancuso directly by Karlheinz Stockhausen. In 2007, Karlheinz Stockhausen... Read More →
SM

Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore is a composer, improviser, audio artist, sound designer, teacher, and curator based in Brooklyn and Providence. His creative work currently manifests as electronic studio compositions, solo and group improvisations, sound installation works, scores for collaborative performance pieces, and sound designs for unusual circumstances. Evidence, his long-standing project with Scott Smallwood, has performed widely and released several... Read More →
JP

João Pedro Oliveira

João Pedro Oliveira studied organ performance, composition and architecture in Lisbon. He completed a PhD in Composition at Stony Brook University. His music includes one chamber opera, several orchestral compositions, a Requiem, 3 string quartets, chamber music, solo instrumental music and electroacoustic music. He has received numerous prizes and awards, including three Prizes at the Bourges Electroacoustic Music Competition, the prestigious... Read More →
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Scott Smallwood

Scott Smallwood was born in Dallas, Texas, and grew up at 10,000 feet in elevation in the Colorado Rockies. At the age of 10, his father gave him a cassette tape recorder, and ever since, he has been fascinated by the possibilities of recorded sound. He listens and makes recordings and observations of places and objects, and draws the resulting sounds into compositions and performances. Ranging from sonic photographs, studio compositions... Read More →


Friday March 27, 2015 7:15pm - 9:45pm
ASU Art Museum 10th St and Mill Ave, Tempe, AZ

9:00pm

Arid Landscapes
Limited Capacity seats available

Arid Landscapes

A string quartet concert on desert landscapes in the southwest U.S.

Desert Ruminations (2014-15)……………....Justin Leo Kennedy
I. Anthropogenic Effect*
II. Drought Ritual Canyon

Night Counterfort (2012)..……..............…….Gil Dori

Desert Rain God (2014)……………………....Chris Lamb

The Wanderer (2014)………………………….Gabe Berry

Burning Grounds (2014)…………...………...Amber Gudaitis

*The Mogollon Rim (2015)……………………Brice L. Johnson
I. Elk Sighting
II. The Trail
III. Star Gazing
IV. Falling Feathers

Notes
The first movement of Desert Ruminations stems from a comment my father made about the noise level of humans versus that of the natural environment at Tonto National Forest, during a winter hike. For the second movement, I imagined a group imitating the desert’s rugged textures and droplets of rain as part of a drought ritual.

Canyon Night Counterfort is a triptych, inspired by three desert paintings: El Contrafuerte Grande by Harold Joe Waldrum, Canyon Country by Georgia O’Keeffe, and Quiet Night by Lew Davis. The piece shifts abruptly, like a spectator in the gallery, from one painting to another. From the depths of the canyon to the soaring moon, the music is shaped by the meditative atmosphere of the desert. 

Desert Rain God is a composition based off of a work of art by the same name painted by Louisa McElwain. Composed as a part of a walk-around music/art tour for the Phoenix Art Museum, the work strives to represent the grandeur and refreshing beauty of the natural landscape as it hangs in the museum.

McElwain passed away a little under a year before the piece was written and thus it is written in her memory. She was inspired by the music of Johannes Brahms. As such the primary motive of the piece is derived from Brahms’ Begräbnisgesang, a funeral ode for winds and chorus. 

The Wanderer was written for a collaboration with Phoenix Art Museum and the ASU Composition Studio. I chose the painting Untitled (Santa Fe Landscape) by Willard Nash for adaptation. In short, the simple shapes and colors used by Nash were the inspiration for my motives, simple leaps that modulate and change as the piece progresses. 

Burning Grounds was inspired by the Philip C. Curtis painting High Chairs. Curtis’ painting portrays an isolated desert, in which several children’s high chairs are present. Some of these chairs are upright, and some are broken, fallen on the burning sand. The title is a reference to the feeling of isolation I saw depicted in the painting. Curtis features no vibrant cactus blossoms, no dazzling colors of exotic desert flora. His landscape is an unending one, strewn with remnants of youth, innocence, and childhood. The piece is a depiction of waning memories, left outside to fade on the burning grounds. 

The Mogollon Rim is a topographical and geological feature running across the U.S. state of Arizona. It extends approximately 200 miles (320 km) from northern Yavapai County eastward, nearing the border with New Mexico. I had the opportunity to hike several miles along the beautiful landscape, in which the topography changes in such a short amount of time. This piece is a reflection of my time hiking along the rim, focusing on native wildlife and ecosystems of this region in Arizona.

*The Mogollon Rim and Anthropogenic Effect are world premieres. 

Speakers
GD

Gil Dori

Gil Dori is an avid composer and a Doctor of Musical Arts student at Arizona State University. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Haifa University, Israel, where he graduated summa cum laude, and a Master of Music degree from ASU. | | Gil’s music has been performed in the US and in Israel, and his works have been selected for Society of Composers, Inc. conferences, PARMA Music Festival, and Electronic Music Midwest Festival. He is the... Read More →
AG

Amber Gudaitis

A composer and choreographer of vibrant creativity, Amber Gudaitis began her artistic training in violin and classical ballet. Her passion and innovation continued to serve her during her higher education and professional work as a trumpet player, composer and choreographer. She has studied at the University of North Texas, Arizona State University, and the University of Leeds in England. Her compositions have been premiered by the Portland... Read More →
BJ

Brice Johnson

Brice L Johnson (b. Greencastle, IN, April 18, 1989) began playing piano at the age of 7. After finding a passion for music in his early elementary years, he took up percussion and eventually started composing. Brice attended Indiana Wesleyan University, where he studied Music Composition and Percussion Performance. While attending IWU, he received multiple honors such as the Jerry Franks Memorial Scholarship, Ruth Moshier Scholarship, IWU Music... Read More →
JK

Justin Kennedy

Justin Kennedy earned an M.M. in composition from the Bob Cole Conservatory of Music and a B.M. in composition with a music theory minor at Chicago College of Performing Arts. While earning those degrees, he received additional training as a pianist, rock drummer, and orchestral percussionist. Presently, he is working towards a D.M.A. at Arizona State University, where he serves as a teaching assistant. He also works as a freelance copyist... Read More →
CL

Chris Lamb

Born in West Point, New York in 1989, Chris Lamb began moving – from New York to Kansas to Panama and Korea. Mr. Lamb experienced a great deal of world culture before settling in Fairfax, Virginia. Once in Virginia, he began to study piano and trombone simultaneously. He began formal composition lessons under Christopher Johnson at the Fairfax High School Academy for Communication Arts. From there, Mr. Lamb attended Christopher Newport... Read More →



Friday March 27, 2015 9:00pm - 10:00pm
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy
 
Saturday, March 28
 

7:00am

Watch Sunrise at James Turrell Skyspace: Air Apparent
Saturday March 28, 2015 7:00am - 9:00am
James Turrell Skyspace: Air Apparent ASU, Tempe, west side of Rural Road at Terrace Road in Tempe

7:30am

Soundwalks: Morning Air Sound Walk: Exploring the Sonic Environment of ASU’s Tempe Campus-Visit of James Turrell’s Skyspace: Air Apparent
Morning Air Sound Walk: Exploring the Sonic Environment of ASU’s Tempe Campus and Visit of James Turrell’s Skyspace: Air Apparent 

Experience the intricate and diverse soundscape of the ASU Tempe campus. We will meet at dawn at the ASU sign at the corner of University and College Avenue and go to the East Side to contemplate sounds around an outdoor sculpture and adjacent garden. Passing by the historic Old Main campus area, we will relax at Air Apparent (2012), created by the famous American light and space artist James Turrell (http://skyspace.asu.edu). Then we will traverse more populated campus areas, ending at the music building in time for morning lectures and presentations. We will meet at 7:30 on Saturday March 28th and the sound walk should take approximately 45-50 minutes. Free event!

Speakers
CL

Chris Lamb

Born in West Point, New York in 1989, Chris Lamb began moving – from New York to Kansas to Panama and Korea. Mr. Lamb experienced a great deal of world culture before settling in Fairfax, Virginia. Once in Virginia, he began to study piano and trombone simultaneously. He began formal composition lessons under Christopher Johnson at the Fairfax High School Academy for Communication Arts. From there, Mr. Lamb attended Christopher Newport... Read More →
CM

Carol Mellis

Chris Lamb, Carol Mellis, Brandon Ransom, and Danielle Van Tuinen are graduate students at the ASU Herberger Institute of Art and Design School of Music majoring in music performance, music composition and music education.
BR

Brandon Ransom

Chris Lamb, Carol Mellis, Brandon Ransom, and Danielle Van Tuinen are graduate students at the ASU Herberger Institute of Art and Design School of Music majoring in music performance, music composition and music education.
DV

Danielle Van Tuinen

Chris Lamb, Carol Mellis, Brandon Ransom, and Danielle Van Tuinen are graduate students at the ASU Herberger Institute of Art and Design School of Music majoring in music performance, music composition and music education.


Saturday March 28, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
ASU Sign, University & College University Dr. & College Ave.

8:00am

Registration
You should register online HERE
This will generate a registration listing and also send you a receipt 
Conference registration name tags will be available to collect at the conference

 

Saturday March 28, 2015 8:00am - 11:00am
Music School Foyer 50 E. Gammage Parkway Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Walking with Water
This exhibit is open 8:00 am-5:00 pm, March 22-29. 

World-Wide-Walks / between earth, water &sky / DESERTS
Peter D'Agostino

World-Wide-Walks have been performed on six continents over the past four decades. Initiated in 1973 as The Walk Series, these video "documentation/performances" evolved into video-web projects during the 1990s and mobile-locative media installations in the 2000s. World-Wide-Walks explore elements of natural, cultural and virtual identities: mixed realities of walking through physical environments and virtually surfing the web. Current projects focus on climate change and the effects of global warming to address concerns for a sustainable future related to ‘glocal’ - global / local – ecologies.

It is conceived as a trilogy of walk projects in the Chihuahuan, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts. The installation proposed for Balance-Unbalance 2015 is based on walks performed in the Chihuahuan Desert at White Sands, Los Alamos and Alamogordo. The mix of ‘natural-cultural-virtual’ concepts is most striking for me at these sites as boundaries for the convergence of nature and culture, spirituality and science. Here, at this crossroads in the desert where the ancient Native American stories of emergence from Mother Earth are told, it is also the site of the first Atomic Bomb detonation. ( The “Fat Boy” bomb on July 16, 1945 preceded “Little Boy”, August 6, Hiroshima; and “Fat Man,” August 9, Nagasaki.) One walk is around a “Fat Man,” a bomb casing on display at the White Sands Missile Range Museum. Walks around Soaptree Yucca plants are testaments to natural survival in the desert ecosystem; while another walk through a field of petroglyphs is about a time dating from the Ancestral Pueblo period of c. 1300 to 1600 AD. (Petroglyph National Monument on New Mexico's West Mesa near Albuquerque.)

Pink Noise 
Yolande Harris

Pink Noise challenges preconceptions about underwater sound by juxtaposing an idyllic video of the ocean surface with the overwhelming, yet often strangely beautiful, anthropogenic noise underneath. By involving the audience in an otherwise alien, inaccessible environment, the installation aims to establish a more empathetic relationship to the underwater world through the immersive experience of the artwork.

The installation consists of a video projection on the floor and a sound recording listened to on headphones. The headphones hang from the ceiling, centered over the video, about 18 inches from the floor (like a fishing line). At first, the audience only sees the video of colorful turquoise and pink light reflecting on the surface of the sea. In order to experience what is beneath the surface, the audience member must step into the video and put on the headphones, at which point s/he is immersed in the piece. The hydrophone recording, made at a Spanish National Marine Reserve at peak tourist season, reveals a surprising range of industrial sounds beneath the surface – loud thumps, grinds, and tones from boat engines, anchors and depth sounders. The underwater sonic environment sharply contrasts with the idyllic video of the surface at the same location, revealing the extent of noise pollution even in a protected marine habitat.

Pink Noise was previously exhibited at: Transmediale, Berlin, 2010; Issue Project Room, New York 2011 (screened version); WRO Media Art Biennale, Wroclaw, Poland 2011; MADATAC Festival, Madrid 2013.

Undercurrent
Teresa Connors & Shannon Harris

Undercurrent is one of a series of ongoing generative audiovisual installations which explores the notion of ecological performativity. Here, the term "ecological" refers to the philosophical school of thought which believes the world to be a network of interconnected and interdependent phenomena. Constructed in Max 6, this generative installation layers a network of visual and aural content that affect each other simultaneously to produce an ever-evolving work. The assets of this installation include oceanic audiovisual field recordings from the west coast of Canada, algorithmic data collected from an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), and real-time convolution of audio field recordings with samples acoustic instruments. The intention of this practice is to contribute in an artistic, experiential, and dynamical means to current thinking around material agency. I purpose that by doing so, creative practice can contribute towards the development of an ontological consideration of ecological performativity. By viewing the world as a network of phenomena that are fundamentally interconnected and interdependent, the result is a performative openness to the world that suggests a means by which to empathically engage, from a non-human exceptionalism perspective, with the complexities of being in, and of the world in the 21st century. Undercurrent is an attempt to foster a greater recognition of the ongoing and entangled ebb and flow of agency between humans and the environment.  

Speakers
PD

Peter D'Agostino

Peter d’Agostino’s pioneering photography, video and interactive projects have been exhibited internationally. Surveys of his work include: Interactivity and Intervention, 1978-99, Lehman College Art Gallery, New York; the World-Wide-Walks projects at the University Art Gallery, Bilbao, Spain (2012); and the University of Paris I Partheon-Sorbonne (2003). Major group exhibitions include: The Whitney Museum of American Art (Biennial... Read More →
YH

Yolande Harris

Yolande Harris is an artist engaged with sound, its image and its role in relating humans and their technologies to the environment. Her artistic projects take the form of audio-visual installations and performances, instruments, walks, performative lectures and writings. Her work is presented internationally in the context of visual art exhibitions, music venues and media art festivals and conferences, including MACBA Barcelona, Schirn... Read More →

Artists
SH

Shannon Harris

Shannon Harris is an artist whose film and video work reflect a creative practice that draws from the particulars and subjectivities of personal experience and landscape. The ways in which documentary and experimental film/video practices intersect, and the potential of expanded notions of documentary are areas of interest to her. Shannon’s work has been screened in North America, New Zealand and the EU. She attended Simon Fraser University... Read More →
TC

Teresa Connors

Teresa Connors is active in many aspects of music practice, being an acoustic/electroacoustic composer, opera singer, film scorer, and multimedia installation artist. She collaborates with many artists from diverse backgrounds and with different sensibilities. Originally from Newfoundland, Canada, Teresa holds a Master of Music degree in composition (1st class honours) from Waikato University in New Zealand and studied both composition and... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Digital Culture Gallery 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Water Imbalance

The exhibit is open 8:00 am to 10:00 pm, March 22-29.  

Water Imbalance
is a curated exhibition planned for the Balance-Unbalance 2015 conference at the Arizona State University Tempe Campus.

Featuring the work of:
Kim Abeles
Sukey Bryan
Betsy Damon
Danielle Eubank
J.J. L’Heureux
Sandra Mueller
Melissa Reischman
Eco Art Collective


Curated by Sandra Mueller and Danielle Eubank

As the majority of the world’s population, it is incumbent upon women to be guardians of the future. We need to look after our people, our natural environment, and our water. Water is a shared resource amongst all people. It is our provider – for sustenance, fishing, farming and regulation of the earth’s climate. This is an exhibition that makes a statement about the unifying preciousness of water by documenting it all over the world with paintings, photography, mixed media, and installations by leading environmental women artists. 

The conceptual theme of the exhibition addresses the consequences of the human footprint globally by looking at the imbalance of the availability and cleanliness of water. We have specifically examined water scarcity, cleanliness, access, expanding deserts, urban engagement, climate change and diminishing glaciers that all reflect an unworkable imbalance. Artists included a written statement addressing water imbalance. For the visual theme, emphasis is on the view of water from a geographical perspective as well as a state of mind.  – Danielle Eubank, March 2015

Sandra Mueller
Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds. Her colorful abstract paintings and photographs have been shown broadly throughout the Pacific Rim region.

Danielle Eubank
Danielle Eubank is a painter interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. Danielle Eubank is an expedition artist in pursuit of painting all of the major bodies of water in the world. She is beginning by painting all of Earth’s oceans. She sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship, The Antigua, on an expedition to the High Arctic in Autumn 2014. She was an Expedition Artist on the Phoenicia, a replica 600 B.C. Phoenician vessel that circumnavigated Africa and was the Expedition Artist on the Borobudur Ship, a replica of an 8th century Indonesian boat that sailed around the African continent.  

Waste Water
Kristian Derek Ball

As unavoidable as it is, water is something that we as humans have to waste to some degree. But we still have options on how we approach, view and interact with our water-related activities. 

The idea behind this new installation is to raise a hyper-awareness of the process of water draining away from us during its usage. The sonic experience of listening to the phenomenon of water in action and its interfacing with those using it, can lead us into this mode of listening which may juxtapose traditional symbolic references. 

The Human Delta
Rachel Mayeri

A delta is a place where a river meets another body of water. A river carries sediment that leaves a triangular pattern where the two bodies of water intersperse. Human bodies are nutrient-rich water and sediment transportation systems. The Human Delta occurs at the toilet, an effluence of millions of gallons of sediment-rich water, which mixes with rivers, aquifers, bays, land, and the ocean. 

Environmentalists are dealing with the human delta as toxic concentrations of bacteria, pharmaceuticals, and other chemicals in partially treated wastewater routinely pollute waterways. Some chemicals which course through human bodies--heart medicine, antibiotics, estrogen--may adversely affect fish populations and their habitats. Yet, the chemicals which are naturally produced in urine--nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium--rather than be construed as waste or pollution, can be used as important nutrients for the soil in which plants grow. Agrobusiness uses fertilizers derived from fossil fuels and mined from limited reserves, contributing to global warming. A more sustainable solution would be to recycle human urine, treat it, and use it as fertilizer, linking the Human Delta back to the ecological cycle productively, rather than destructively. 

The Human Delta is an art-science project intended to increase public awareness about the human "waste" at its point of departure: the bathroom. A series of posters are installed in conference bathrooms, and are available for distribution. Toilets are interstitial, potentially contemplative spaces, which underscore the hidden, segregated, white-tiled, and taboo nature of the subject. 

One poster is about the flow of pharmaceuticals from human bodies into a river delta. Informed by scientific research which has found concentrations of caffeine in the Puget Sound, the poster depicts the Starbucks logo as a flow of caffeine, hormones, antibiotics, and medicines entering and leaving the human body, and cycling back as disturbed (caffeinated, aggressive, effeminate) fish. Another poster is about the potential of urine as a fertilizer. It depicts a farmer fountain: a stream of water pours forth from kidneys and bladder, fertilizing a field of corn. Text on the poster reads: "urine is fertilizer" / "nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium." 


Artists
BD

Betsy Damon

Betsy Damon is an eco-activist artist who works with water, site-specific sculpture, urban design and community. In 1998, Betsy created the Living Water Garden in Sichuan, China, a six-acre urban park that has become an icon for natural water-cleaning systems. She has worked on design teams, notably contributing the wetland system in the Beijing Olympic Park. In the US, Betsy has worked with communities, bringing together arts... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Eubank

Danielle Eubank

University of La Verne
Danielle Eubank is a painter and curator interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. She is painting all of the major bodies of water on the planet, starting with the oceans. In addition to her studio practice, Ms. Eubank is an expedition artist. She sailed aboard the tall ship, The Antigua, on an art and science expedition to the High Arctic in... Read More →
EC

Eco-Art Collective

The Eco-Art Collective is an activist group of the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art dedicated to sustainable stewardship of the environment. Participating Artists: Carolyn Applegate, Amy Bauer, Marie Cenkner, Danielle Eubank, Katherine Kean, Nancy Lissaman, Marion Melchiorre, Sandra Mueller, Annemarie Rawlinson, Seda Saar, Louise Wannier, Frances White.
KA

Kim Abeles

Kim Abeles' installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Among her many honors, Abeles has been recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation, Pollack-Krasner Foundation, and the California Arts Council. She is a 2014 Lucas Visual... Read More →
KD

Kristian Derek Ball

Kristian Derek Ball has designed sound and written music for theatrical and film companies both nationally and internationally, as well as recorded and produced music for various artists and musicians worldwide. He has designed sound for regional and local companies such as Metropolitan Theatre Ensemble in Kansas City, The Children’s Theatre Company in Minneapolis, and Allentown Public Theatre among others, and has spent the last 5 years... Read More →
MR

Melissa Reischman

Melissa Reischman was born in Portland, Oregon. She studied graphic design at the Colorado Institute of Art and went on to build a career as an award-winning graphic designer. During this time she followed the urge to develop her own artistic vision through paintings and drawings, studying with Richard Bunkhall and Ray Turner at Art Center College of Design. Reischman’s work explores movement of light, color and atmosphere. Her paintings... Read More →
RM

Rachel Mayeri

Rachel Mayeri is a Los Angeles-based media artist working at the intersection of science and art. Her projects explore topics ranging from the history of special effects to the human animal. Her videos and installations have shown at Sundance, Berlinale, Documenta 13, Ars Electronica, The Getty Museum, and MoMA PS1. She is the recipient of numerous grants, including the Wellcome Trust, Creative Capital, and the California Council for the... Read More →
SM

Sandra Mueller

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds... Read More →
SB

Sukey Bryan

Sukey Bryan was born in New Jersey in 1961, and grew up in Connecticut and France. She graduated in 1983 from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Fine Arts and English. She worked for five years as a graphic designer in New York with Vignelli Associates, followed by three years of freelance work in San Francisco. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1990. Bryan received grants from... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 8:00am - 10:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Water Keynote - Char Miller and Annea Lockwood
Limited Capacity seats available

Live stream here 

Speakers
AL

Annea Lockwood

Annea Lockwood is known for her explorations of the rich world of natural acoustic sounds and environments, in works ranging from sound art and installations and performance art to concert music. Her music has been performed in many venues and festivals and extensively recorded. | | She has created several sound maps of famous rivers including the Danube, Hudson, and the Housatonic. See some of the press on her work here. Wild Energy, in... Read More →
CM

Char Miller

Char Miller is a renowned and award-winning environmental historian who specializes in | | U.S. environmental history, urban history, politics and policy, water issues, federal public-lands management, and cultural history. He is the director of the Environmental Analysis Program and W. M. Keck Professor of Environmental Analysis at Pomona College. | | He is a prolific writer who published twenty books and edited volumes.


Saturday March 28, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy

10:30am

Session 2 Panel Stream: Place Issues and Art-Science Interactions: Tree Mortality and Big Copper in the American Southwest

Session 2 Panel Stream: Place Issues and Art-Science Interactions: Tree Mortality and Big Copper in the American Southwest 

Ellen McMahon, Beth Weinstein, David Breshears, Jesse Chehak and Karen Zimmermann: "On Tree Mortality Through the Lens of Art and Science"
The Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests during the last decade. Scientists based at the University of Arizona are working to understand the exact mechanisms of this tree mortality so they can better predict how fast and far-reaching die-offs will be in coming years. Research indicates that the combination of drought and beetle infestation, which trees were able to survive in the past, is now becoming fatal given the addition of a third factor — global warming.

Creating the necessary change in public attitudes to motivate adaptation to climate change requires a well-considered combination of artistic and scientific means. The Southwestern United States is predicted to be hit harder and sooner by the effects of climate change than almost any other heavily populated region in the world. In this threat lies the opportunity to demonstrate how the arts and sciences can work together to spur public debate and understanding and inspire the civic action needed to face the challenges. The Southwest will be a test case and and an example for other similarly threatened regions of the world. Aware of art and design as potent means of changing the way people see and feel about the natural world, this group of artists, designers and scientists is collaborating in order to raise public awareness and catalyze action.

The panel highlights diverse forms of research, representation and expression characteristic of science, art and design as they work in concert to communicate the effect of climate change—in this particular case, forest die-off. The panel gathers five people: the lead scientist studying conifer collapse in the Southwest, the designer of the scientist’s information graphics, the artist of a body of work catalysed by a personal experience of forest die-off and the artist-architect team of the installation Prone to Collapse (on view in the ASU Night Gallery). The presentations will explore how meaning changes and accumulates as the same content moves from one disciplinary form to another, providing insights into the roles of these disciplines in helping us meet the environmental challenges that lie ahead.

Kimi Eisele and Josh Schachter: "Arizona Artists to Respond to Big Copper" 
This panel brings together artists, conservationists, and indigenous leaders to discuss how the arts can address critical environmental and resource extraction issues in creative ways and through innovative partnerships. The proposed Rosemont Copper mine in Southern Arizona would permanently disturb over 3,700 acres of public land, including habitat for nine endangered and threatened species (including the only jaguar living in the U.S.) and key cultural heritage sites for the Tohono O’odom, and severely impact Tucson and critical water resources in the region. Speakers will highlight a series of arts-based projects, which aimed to increase awareness of and generate dialogue about what could be lost. Projects include a photography exhibit: Lens on the Land - Rosemont: What’s at Stake?, showcasing 50 images by over 30 different local and regional photographers, biologists and community members in collaboration with Save the Scenic Santa Ritas, Sonoran Institute, and other key partners; and Rosemont Ours: A Field Guide, a dance film produced by New ARTiculations Dance Theatre with visual artist Ben Johnson, celebrating the plant and animal species of the threatened region. Additional artistic efforts include drawings and paintings and writings by poets. Key partners in the effort were the Sonoran Institute and Save the Scenic Santa Ritas, two conservation organizations working to oppose the mine who have demonstrated a commitment to working with artists to increase public dialogue and awareness. 

Panelists include lead artists Kimi Eisele and Josh Schachter; Ofelia Rivas, Tohono O’odham leader; and Brian Powell, a wildlife biologist working to monitor species in the area and cocoordinator of Lens on the Land. Panelists will discuss the challenges and benefits of building partnerships, the power of leveraging partnerships to extend the project’s reach, and the difference between the arts as an advocacy strategy and the arts as a general awareness-raising tool.


Moderators
AS

Arthur Sabatini

Arthur J. Sabatini is an Associate Professor of Performance Studies in the Interdisciplinary Arts and Performance Department at Arizona State University. Dr. Sabatini holds a PhD from the Department of Performance Studies, New York University. His areas of specialization include: Avant-Garde and Experimental Art, 20t/21st Century Theory and Aesthetic Research. He has been involved in new music and performance, principally with the... Read More →

Speakers
DB

David Breshears

David D. Breshears is a Professor of Natural Resources in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona; he also has a joint appointment with the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. His research focuses on the ecohydrology of dryland ecosystems, vegetation gradients spanning grassland to forest, wind- and water-driven sediment transport and erosion, and particularly on drought-induced tree... Read More →
JC

Jesse Chehak

Jesse Chehak maintains a studio practice in photography, video and installation. In 2005, he joined M.A.P. and began executing editorial features and print campaigns in the U.S. and Europe. His photographs have been published in The New York Times, GQ, Vanity Fair, ID, People, Newsweek and Wallpaper. His exhibition history includes solo and group efforts in a variety of galleries and experimental project spaces, including Danese (NYC), Durham Art... Read More →
KE

Kimi Eisele

Kimi Eisele is a multidisciplinary artist working in the literary, dance, visual, and participatory arts. Her writing has been published in literary magazines, anthologies, and online news outlets. She has recently completed a novel about America in the post-apocalypse. She has directed multiple community dance projects for New ARTiculations Dance Theatre, on issues such as endangered species (Rosemont Ours: A Field Guide, 2013), water... Read More →
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
BP

Brian Powell

Brian Powell is Tucson-based photographer and a wildlife biologist. He has received national and international photography awards, including a First Place in the Travel Photographer of the Year (2010) competition and Grand Prize in the National Geographic/Nikon Full Story Contest (2013).
OR

Ofelia Rivas

Ofelia Rivas: Ofelia is the founder of the O’odham VOICE Against the WALL and the O’odham Cultural and Environmental Justice Coalition. She is a representative of the traditional O’odham elders and ceremony leaders, and has represented the O’odham at the World People's Summit on Climate Change in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and as part of the Zapatista La Otra Campaña. She led the successful fight to prevent a toxic waste dump near the... Read More →
JS

Josh Schachter

Josh Schachter is a visual storyteller, social ecologist, teaching artist, and cultural organizer who has collaborated with organizations throughout the US and around the globe to photographically document critical social and environmental issues, from food security to urban revitalization. His images have been published internationally in books, magazines and films in venues ranging from the New York Times to the Navajo Times. Josh earned a... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →
KZ

Karen Zimmermann

Karen Zimmermann is a Professor in the Visual Communications, Graphic Design and Illustration Division at the University of Arizona. Her practice includes activities in writing, graphic design (including information graphics), and art. Her writing has been published in The Education of a Graphic Designer, The Education of an E Designer, The Education of a Motion Designer, JAB (Journal of Artists’ Books), Design Education in Progress... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Stauffer B125 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

10:30am

Session 2 Paper Stream 1: Crossroads of Climate Change and the Human Dimension
Session 2 Paper Stream 1: Crossroads of Climate Change and the Human Dimension

David I. Tafler and Peter D'Agostino: "Deserts Crossroads of Natural-Cultural-Virtual Environments During Climatic Changes" 
“Deserts, which account for the largest percentage of the Earth’s terrestrial surface area and a majority of the western North American landscape, are among the ecosystems predicted to be the most sensitive to global change.” * 

This paper will review the co-authors’ desert experiences, focusing on the US and Australia, as well as serving as a preview of new works-in-progress on climate change and the effects of global warming to address concerns for a sustainable future. 

Deserts have embedded eco-systems that represent linear/cyclical boundaries between static and dynamic forces. Intermittent, ethereal, and virtual desert rivers trace a repository of past climatic and historic events. The dry river systems of the American southwest: the Gila, Salt, Aqua Fria; and of central Australia: the Finke, Todd, Macumba, form historic and spiritual tracks and intersections. Their perennial flow preserves their path, and those paths form grids marking the historic morphology of the surrounding land - "technological, organizational, and ideational" systems, bridges, buildings, communities, and agriculture. 

World-Wide-Walks / between earth,water &sky/ DESERTS ( work-in-progress, 2008 -) is conceived as a trilogy of walk projects in the Chihuahuan, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts.** 

The mix of ‘natural-cultural-virtual’ concepts is most striking at these sites as boundaries for the convergence of nature and culture, spirituality and science. In these deserts, ancient Native American stories of emergence from Mother Earth are told and petroglyphs dating from the Ancestral Pueblo period of c. 1300 to 1600 AD are preserved; and, it is here that the first Atomic Bomb was detonated during the summer of 1945, preceding the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

With accelerating climatic, cultural and technological changes, including current debates on nuclear and solar energy, deserts may again be a ‘ground zero’ embodying the changing episodic-narrative, a labyrinthine marker for envisaging the future. 

* S.Smith, R.Monson, J.Anderson, Physiological Ecology of North American Desert Plants. 

** World-Wide-Walks, performed on six continents over the past four decades, explore elements of natural, cultural and virtual identities: mixed realities of walking through physical environments and virtually surfing the web. 

Lawrence Culver: "Manifest Destiny or Manifest Disaster? Climate, Climate Change, and Westward Expansion in Arid North America"
This paper will demonstrate that the current debate over climate change and climate policy can be connected to a much longer historical context. Climate change has been a subject of heated debate for centuries, and knowledge of that debate can help foster more constructive climate change dialogue and policy in the present. The promises and perils of climate played a central role in the global settlement and colonization efforts of Europeans. Prospective settlers speculated about climate to evaluate the agricultural or healthful qualities of different regions. Some Europeans even speculated that climates could change, whether through natural or human action. Perceptions of climate were informed by science, religion, folk belief, and prior agricultural experience. The U.S. government, dependent on the sale of western lands for revenue, financed expeditions and lavishly illustrated reports that, though filled with cartographic and scientific data, also functioned as promotional real estate tracts. 

When explorers or settlers tried to discern climate, they were primarily “reading” landscapes. A new landscape, and its vegetation, animal life, and surface water held clues to its climate. Settlers lacked modern climate science, and, no less importantly, long-term experience with these landscapes. One example of this was the U.S. Southwest, annexed in 1848 after a war with Mexico driven by southern slave owners convinced the entire region was soon to become a vast cotton plantation. Antislavery northerners were just as convinced the Southwest was worthless desert. Another example was the Great Plains, which witnessed a large in-migration hastened by a wildly incorrect climatic theory: the claim that “rain would follow the plow,” and cultivation would transform arid climates. This theory would prove disastrous. Nor were its consequences limited to North America. Australian settlers, for example, believed it too, and ultimately it would cause environmental and economic havoc on multiple continents. Debate about climate and climate change long predates our era, and has never been solely about climate, but instead about culture, economics, and ideology. By deepening our historical perspective and broadening the terms of climate change dialogue, we can help create a more effective climate policy for our collective future. 

Jennifer Post: "Climate Change, Mobile Pastoralism and Cultural Heritage in Western Mongolia"
The social and cultural impact of climate change today is evident in urban and rural communities around the world. Possibly the most socially, economically and culturally vulnerable are those peoples who move as a way of life, and today, also experience the effects of displacement due to climate change. For those living close to the natural world, the changes impact nearly every aspect of their lives. The evolving cultural forms of Kazakh mobile pastoralists living in the Altai Sayan ecoregion of western Mongolia offer evidence of the significant social and cultural adjustments one such group has made due to climate changes. Responses of these semi-nomadic herders to climate events in lands that range from desert- to forest-steppe can be measured in their instrumental tunes and songs, their production of musical instruments, needlework and felt work, and heritage actions such as work patterns and ceremonial gatherings. While these expressions of tangible and intangible heritage have been maintained in conjunction with their lives and lifestyles for generations, today some have been disrupted. Extreme weather events such a long periods of bitter cold and high winds during the winter, desertification that affects availability of grasses for livestock and dries up essential sources of water, and forced or voluntary movement from grazing lands, have all impacted Kazakh herders economically and ecologically, and this is expressed culturally in their music, woodworking and fiber crafts, and decision-making around community actions and events. The presence (and absence) of their cultural practices provide direct commentaries on change that reveal sources of tension and anxiety that has resonated throughout the region during the last decade. Many herders have stepped away, leaving behind not only their much-needed caretaking of the land, but some have also abandoned their cultural practices. In this paper I draw on my fieldwork since 2004 with Mongolian Kazakh herders, and on research that contributes to current discourses on ecology and pastoralism as well as on climate change and changing culture, to address the impact of climate change on cultural production, including the maintenance of knowledge systems and innovation among mobile pastoral herders in western Mongolia. 

Moderators
JN

Jay Needham

Jay Needham is a sound artist, electro-acoustic composer, teacher, and scholar. He utilizes multiple creative platforms and his works often have a focus on recorded sound, archives, and the interpretation of artifacts. His sound art, works for radio, and visual art have appeared at museums, festivals and on the airwaves worldwide. Through applied aspects of his research, Needham strives to affect positive change and bridge the... Read More →

Speakers
LC

Lawrence Culver

Dr. Lawrence Culver is an associate professor in the History Department at Utah State University, where his areas of research and teaching include cultural, environmental, and urban history. He received his PhD at UCLA, and his doctoral dissertation received the 2005 Rachel Carson Prize for best dissertation from the American Society for Environmental History. His first book is The Frontier of Leisure: Southern California and the Shaping of... Read More →
PD

Peter D'Agostino

Peter d’Agostino’s pioneering photography, video and interactive projects have been exhibited internationally. Surveys of his work include: Interactivity and Intervention, 1978-99, Lehman College Art Gallery, New York; the World-Wide-Walks projects at the University Art Gallery, Bilbao, Spain (2012); and the University of Paris I Partheon-Sorbonne (2003). Major group exhibitions include: The Whitney Museum of American Art (Biennial... Read More →
JP

Jennifer Post

Jennifer C. Post is an ethnomusicologist whose in-depth fieldwork includes research on music in Inner Asia, especially music among Kazakh mobile pastoralists in Mongolia, on North Indian musical traditions, and on rural Northern New England performance practice. Her current work includes studies on the impact of social and ecological change on musical performance and musical instrument production and use in Mongolia and other regions of Inner... Read More →
DI

David I. Tafler

David I. Tafler is Professor of Media and Communication at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. As a consultant for the Irish Red Cross Society (IRCS) in Banda Aceh, Indonesia (the ground zero site of the 2004 Tsunami) in 2009, he co-developed and authored a manual on communication and new communication technologies for the support of beneficiary populations in disaster-prone regions. Tafler has worked with the Pitjantjatjara... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Katzin Concert Hall, Music Building 50 E Gammage Pkwy

10:30am

Session 2 Paper Stream 2: Values of Water & Participatory Engagement
Session 2 Paper Stream 2: Values of Water & Participatory Engagement

Adeela Arshad-Ayaz and Muhammad Naseem: "Whose Survival? The Planet Will Be There, What About Us? Interrogating the Neo-Liberal Context for Relationship Between Education, Sustainability, and Water"
This presentation is premised on the argument that the contemporary mainstream economics is focused on the flow of money and markets, ignoring how economic activity is unconditionally dependent on the goods and services supplied by the natural environment. For example, the neo-liberal trade practices predicated on the production-consumption fetish are vitally linked and detrimental to the world water sources. Presented as a panacea for development and growth issues, these practices ignore this vital link to the natural environment, including water. Given that human population will reach around nine billion people in the middle of this century (UN, 2004), the supply and consumption of water is going to be one of the foremost problems facing the people across the globe. Against this backdrop the paper will address important questions and issues related to water, such as: What will be the implications of continuing with environmentally unsustainable practices for the availability/consumption of water in the developed as well as the developing world? What are the various levels of efforts required to enact the policies and practices, which will allow the sustainability standards to be met? What types of radical reforms are needed to change the equation from human-nature relation – in favor of nature–human relation? Specifically, the paper examines environmental impacts resulting from a huge, unmediated increase in human economic activity under neo-liberal discourse. It especially examines neo-liberal production and free trade policies to understand how these policies adversely affect the availability and consumption of water. It argues that neo-liberal policies deliberately obscure critical questions that can be raised about climate change, the political economy of resource preservation and redistribution, and especially about the shortages of water. Finally, the paper will explore how can educators get (and disseminate) the message that it is not about the survival of the planet—rather it is about saving ourselves, by saving those features of the planet, such as water, on which mankind depends and which are now seriously at risk.

Ksenia Fedorova and Marc Barasch: "Mission to Earth: Visual Interfaces for Participatory Geo-Engineering"
Our sense of the self and its relation to its surroundings is being reshaped by telematic prostheses that expand our felt sense of inhabiting and interacting with the wider environment. Heidegger famously wrote that we need to hear the wind whistling in the chimney to perceive it not as an abstraction but in its "thingness." Similarly, can new-media maps be the "chimney" to evoke an experience of the living complexities of the environment for those of us in the house of urban civilization? This paper will consider a number of artistic/technological strategies for visual interfaces addressing ecological issues. Each form implies its own principles of engaging public participation, visual codes, and spatial contexts. Using the tools of GIS (Geographic Information System), artists and environmental ‘entrepreneurs’ display imagery on screens ranging from mobile handheld to building-sized media facades that show not only graphic representations of data but invite public interaction. An installation by the environmental nonprofit Green World Campaign – inspired by Joseph Beuys' notion of "social sculpture" – consisted of ten jumbo screens in Times Square that enabled passersby to "text TREE" and catalyze global treeplanting. This idea has been also adopted to be used for the screen displays at a series of music concerts "Every Concert Plants a Forest". The audience's cellphones are turned from "glowing sticks" into "planting sticks": shaking a phone instigates direct action and feedback on the Green World Map documenting real-time progress in tree-planting and land restoration. Another Green World project in development, "Rumuruti Forest," is a "positive feedback loop" mapping real-time complexities and perplexities of restoring a 15,000-tree Kenyan forest in multiple info-layers (including radiotagging elephants, geotagging tree-planting, the state of soil biota, CO2 absorption, impact of local culture, etc.). Spectators will experience and interact with these data in a variety of interface forms: a panorama screen, online, via cellphones. These and other projects pose questions: How can crowd-sourced environmental representations and digitally mediated forms of distributed intelligence conceptually and pragmatically transform current ecological strategies? How does the new agenda of environmental activism become a productive challenge for the conventions within the artistic world? 


Esteban Garcia and Tim McGraw: "Ideal Flow: The Art and Science of Early Computational Models by Aldo Giorgini"
Simulating is a way of learning and deeply understanding natural phenomena. In the mid 1960s, scientists started to use computers to visualize complex mathematical models to further understand the behavior of large bodies of water. At Purdue University, Aldo Giorgini created algorithms to simulate turbulence and other water perturbations beginning in 1967 as part of his research at the School of Civil Engineering. The resulting visual outputs awoke Giorgini’s inner artist and motivated him to incorporate the computer-based water simulations as the base for his compositions. This paper analyzes primary sources found at Giorgini’s estate and revisits Giorgini’s contribution through a modern-day and interactive application.

Moderators
AJ

Adriene Jenik

Adriene Jenik began at the ASU Herberger Institute School of Art on July 1, 2009 as its director. She is a telecommunications media artist who has been working for over 20 years as a teacher, curator, administrator, and engineer. Her works combine "high" technology and human desire to propose new forms of literature, cinema, and performance. She received her BA in English from Douglass College, Rutgers University, and her MFA in Electronic Arts... Read More →

Speakers
AA

Adeela Arshad-Ayaz

Dr. A. Arshad-Ayaz is an Assistant Professor of Education at Concordia University. She holds a Ph.D. in Sociology of Education from McGill University (Montreal). Dr. Arshad-Ayaz is a post-colonial critical theorist. She has taught for universities in Pakistan (Humdard University), Canada (McGill University, Bishops University, University of Regina and Concordia University) and the United Kingdom (external program University of London, London... Read More →
MB

Marc Barasch

Marc Ian Barasch is the founder and director of the Green World Campaign, a nonprofit that has worked to restore the ecology and economy of poor communities living on degraded land in six countries through tree planting, eco-agriculture, small-scale technology, and sustainable economic development. He was a member of the U.N. Advisory Committee for the Year of Forests 2011. A book author, magazine editor, TV producer, and media activist, his... Read More →
KF

Ksenia Fedorova

Ksenia Fedorova is a media art researcher and curator. She holds a PhD in Philosophy from St.Petersburg University (Russia) and is a PhD candidate at the Cultural Studies Graduate Group, University of California Davis (USA). She has been an initiator and curator of the “Art. Science. Technology” program at the Ural branch of the National Center for Contemporary Arts (Ekaterinburg, RU). She is a co-editor (with Nina Sosna) of... Read More →
EG

Esteban García

Esteban García Bravo explores computational arts as a researcher, a practitioner and as an educator. He earned his MFA from Purdue University in 2008, and a Ph.D. in Technology, also from Purdue, in 2013. His research has been featured in the annual meetings of international organizations such as SIGGRAPH and ISEA, as well as in the publication Leonardo Journal of Art, Sciences and Technology. His artwork has been featured... Read More →
TM

Tim McGraw

Tim McGraw is an Assistant Professor of Computer Graphics Technology. His areas of interest are biologically-inspired graphics, medical image processing and visualization. Specific projects include diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) denoising and visualization, and mesh processing. He was awarded 4 patents related to DT-MRI visualization projects performed with Siemens Corporate Research. He has previous industry experience as a Mechanical Engineer... Read More →
MN

Muhammad Naseem

Dr. M. Ayaz Naseem is an Associate Professor of Education at Concordia University. He holds a Ph.D. in Comparative and International Education from McGill University (Montreal). Currently he also holds the Georg Arnhold Research Professorship at the Georg Eckert Institute in Braunschweig, Germany. His research interests include environment and peace education, social media as a space for peace, feminist theory and philosophy, education in... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Art 220 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

10:30am

Session 2 Paper Stream 3: Remote Experiences of Place

Session 2 Paper Stream 3: Remote Experiences of Place 

Yolande Harris: "Listening to the Ocean in the Desert"

My paper examines how we relate to distant locations through listening. In particular, it explores the insights that can be gained by re-contextualizing sounds from the ocean within a desert environment. Building on Acoustic Ecology and environmental art practice and theory (Kahn, Dunn, Lippard, Harrison and Harrison, CLUI), I propose that expanded forms of awareness can emerge through technological media and critical listening techniques. My artistic practice and theoretical proposals on techno-intuition and sonic consciousness further claim that increasing auditory awareness of one’s environment promotes a sense of belonging, environmental stewardship, and engagement. 

Recent developments in oceanographic technology enable unprecedented access to sounds, video, and other data from the deep ocean. I am developing artistic and theoretical approaches to interpreting and communicating this information, based on current research by oceanographers at the University of Washington. My artwork Listening to the Distance (2015) is a two-part project consisting of an audio-visual installation – Eagle – and sound walk – Whale – that explore how we can experience and share distant environments through animal visions, remote presence, and underwater sound. In Eagle, I re-contextualize ocean hydrophone recordings collected from an autonomous vehicle, called a “sea glider”, as it tracks through the ocean recording its environment. In Whale, different voices of marine mammals speak from the ocean into your ear, acting as a remote guide through the desert environment. Juxtaposing these oceanic voices, both technological and animal, with the desert asks us to imagine connections to environments that are remote but nevertheless essentially connected via global climate systems and ancient imaginings. 

My work makes explicit the dependence on technological instruments to access these distant environments and it critically examines the layers of mediation and interpretation involved in both artistic and scientific investigations. However, by bringing underwater sound to individual listeners in the desert, these disparate environments are connected in a direct, embodied artistic experience that parallels their interdependence as part of global climate systems. By provoking an underlying empathy through a sense of remote presence, I argue that Listening to the Distance personalizes the extreme diversity, systemic interconnection, and planetary scale of oceans and deserts. 

Garth Paine, Sabine Feisst, Leah Barclay, and Daniel Gilfillan: "The Listen(n) Project: Embodied Experiences of UNESCO Biosphere Reserves through Acoustic Ecology and Digital Technology"
Listen(n) is an interdisciplinary collaborative project that explores remote embodied landscapes of UNESCO Biosphere Reserves through sound. The project focuses on community awareness, sustainability, environmental engagement, critical enquiry and interpretative discourse around questions of how digital technology and rich media environments can be used to create experiences of being present in remote environments. 

Specifically it engages with notions of community place-making through six UNESCO Biosphere Reserves in Arizona, New Mexico and California to promote sustainable development based on local community efforts whilst representing the richness and diversity of the southwest desert ecosystem. Through extensive sound-based fieldwork in each location, Listen(n) explores how a notion of belonging to landscape/environment can develop environmental stewardship. In our current state of ecological crisis, the Listen(n) project is designed to explore how these notions of immersive environmental engagement through virtual technologies could cultivate environmental engagement through sound. 

The Listen(n) project questions what constitutes attention in sound and through the embodied experiences actively engage participants in consideration of the question: what is listening and how central is the sonic environment to our communal, social and global health? It asks if acoustic ecology, the critical examination and creative representation of sonic environments, can focus communities on their local environment whilst simultaneously building national and international communities for stewardship and sustainability. 

At its core, the Listen(n) project explores a range of research questions about the role and function of sound and the perception of sound for a deeper understanding of questions pertaining to place, presence, belonging and sustainability. As a perceptive mode that inherently engages an intermedial relationship to the world, sound both conveys and withholds knowledge, adopting and adapting the realms of the vocal, the textual, the spatial, and the affective to be mediated for reception and parsing aurally, and by extension epistemologically, in the mind of the listener. Sound’s ability to capture and convey movement, spatiality, and emotion in very distinct ways works synergistically with the human mind’s ability to unify within consciousness a number of perceptual inputs, such that a cognitive picture of the world and one’s position within it comes to light. The immersive sonic productions, which form the foundation of Listen(n), provide a palpable framework within which such a phenomenology of human experience of the world can be experienced, shared, examined and understood. 

Grant Smith, Maria Papadomanolaki and Dawn Scarfe: "Reveil: New Experiments with Environmental Radio" 
This presentation introduces Reveil, a project of the London-based artist collective, soundCamp. It includes extracts from the first Reveil broadcast over 3-4 May 2014 and proposes contexts and reflections towards a second event in 2015.

Reveil is a 24-hour broadcast of live daybreak sounds, realized by a global network of streamers, along with sounds from webcams, hydrophone observatories and independent channels. Relayed from a soundcamp near the Greenwich Meridian, Reveil travels West from microphone to microphone in a continuous live transmission lasting one earth day.

Reveil is anticipated by the work of Maryanne Amacher, Bill Fontana, Max Neuhaus, Tetsuo Kogawa and more recent practitioners (eg at Locus Sonus), who have found ways and means to stream live audio from one location to another. 

It has antecedents in the transects imagined by ornithologist Don Kroodsma and the sound collages of field recordists Gordon Hempton and Bernie Krause, which extend and re-present the transient experience of daybreak, as well as 'capturing' fragile, endangered soundscapes.

And it resonates with calls by Murray Schafer and Bruce Davis for an 'Environmental' or 'Wilderness Radio' that would relay rural sounds to urban places, prefiguring the emerging live audio networks which Reveil taps into and extends.

At the same time, Reveil involves practical activities which focus on the experiences of camping, streaming, or listening in situations that combine the routine and the exceptional (such as camping overnight in an inner city nature reserve). Participants encounter local and remote soundscapes that are equally 'always already there' and previously unheard. Daily tasks - cooking, sleeping, fetching water - take place to a broader rhythm correlated with our physical displacement on a moving planet.

We speculate on what is at stake in these activities, with reference to key terms drawn from the sources above: displacement / emplacement; rural / urban; hi-fi / low-fi; human / natural; wild / constructed; local / remote; artist / audience. And we consider how such a practice can contribute to contesting and re-imagining the distinctions and values they imply.

Finally, we invite contributions to the next soundCamp / reveil, which coincides with International Dawn Chorus Day 2015. 


Moderators
SM

Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore is a composer, improviser, audio artist, sound designer, teacher, and curator based in Brooklyn and Providence. His creative work currently manifests as electronic studio compositions, solo and group improvisations, sound installation works, scores for collaborative performance pieces, and sound designs for unusual circumstances. Evidence, his long-standing project with Scott Smallwood, has performed widely and released several... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
avatar for Sabine Feisst

Sabine Feisst

Professor of Music, Arizona State University
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American... Read More →
DG

Daniel Gilfillan

Daniel Gilfillan (Ph.D., University of Oregon, 2000) is Associate Professor of German Studies and Information Literacy at Arizona State University in the School of International Letters and Cultures, and Faculty Affiliate in Film and Media Studies and Jewish Studies. His research focuses on 20th-century literature, film and media studies in the German-speaking sphere, with particular interests in avant-garde/experimental approaches to new forms... Read More →
YH

Yolande Harris

Yolande Harris is an artist engaged with sound, its image and its role in relating humans and their technologies to the environment. Her artistic projects take the form of audio-visual installations and performances, instruments, walks, performative lectures and writings. Her work is presented internationally in the context of visual art exhibitions, music venues and media art festivals and conferences, including MACBA Barcelona, Schirn... Read More →
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →
MP

Maria Papadomanolaki

Maria Papadomanolaki is a Greek artist who works within the fields of sound design for dance and film, networked performances, exploratory workshops, installation and transmission art. She has a background in literary and sound studies. Since 2009, she has also been successfully releasing ambient electronic music on a variety of labels and collaborations under the moniker Dalot. Between 2009-2011, she was involved in a research project about... Read More →
DS

Dawn Scarfe

Dawn Scarfe is an artist whose work investigates resonance, perception and environmental atmospheres. She works across a variety of media and contexts including site-specific installation, performance and field recording. Recent exhibitions include Klinkende Stad Kortrijk, ZKM Karlsruhe, Q-O2 Brussels, La Casa Encendida Madrid, TONSPUR Museumsquartier Vienna, Bios Athens and 176 Zabludowicz Collection, London.


Saturday March 28, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Art 246 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

12:15pm

Solar Soundwalk
Meet outside the Stauffer B building under the breezeway. 

During the past few years, Scott Smallwood has embarked on an experimental practice of designing solar powered instruments. These instruments are designed to utilize available energy using raw solar energy with no battery buffering, creating an opportunity to interface with environmental conditions in outdoor soundscapes. At specified times during the conference, Scott will lead a soundwalk involving a solarsonic improvisation using these instruments. Conference attendees are invited to participate as improvisors and/or listeners during these outdoor sessions.

Speakers
SS

Scott Smallwood

Scott Smallwood was born in Dallas, Texas, and grew up at 10,000 feet in elevation in the Colorado Rockies. At the age of 10, his father gave him a cassette tape recorder, and ever since, he has been fascinated by the possibilities of recorded sound. He listens and makes recordings and observations of places and objects, and draws the resulting sounds into compositions and performances. Ranging from sonic photographs, studio compositions... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 12:15pm - 12:45pm
Stauffer B 1st floor hallway 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

12:15pm

Dialogues on Sustainability: Atmosphere for Thought
Synthesis and AME will host in the Matthews Center iStage an atmosphere for thought in which we will stage a series of dialogues on sustainability topics. We will configure the iStage as a responsive environment whose potential response to activity can be dialed to different microclimates. These dialogues are structured improvisational ensemble, the actually "performed" conversation in an environment which responds to and co-constitutes the atmosphere of the conversations. Dialogues will include Walking as Performance toward Environmental Awareness and Representing vs Inhabiting Place.

Saturday March 28, 2015 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Matthews Center iStage 950 Cady Mall Tempe, AZ 85287

12:15pm

Lunchtime Concert: Night Study No. 1 and Hydatos
Night Study No. 1 (2013) ........................  Felipe Otondo
Our bike is the colour of the night.
Our bike is a black donkey dawning
Through lands of Curiosity.
(Roberto Bolaño)

The idea behind this work stems from a poem by Roberto Bolaño describing a night motorcycle journey across the Mexican desert. The piece explores the nocturnal sonic landscape of urban and rural locations and is structured as a sonic journey exploring real and abstract soundscapes linked to various stages of an endless imaginary trip. The work was composed using environmental recordings captured in various urban and rural locations and synthesized timbral and rhythmic material generated from gamelan sounds. The work was composed at the Visby Centre for Composers, presented in various European countries and winner of the 2014 Musica Viva competition.

Hydatos (2012) ........................ João Pedro Oliveira 
Hydatos is a greek word that means “water”.
This piece is inspired on the first verses of the Old Testament (Genesis Chapter 1:2)
“And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.”
The video part relates to the theme of water in an abstract and concrete way, sometimes suggesting water images, sometimes suggesting metaphors. The audio part was synthesized and uses several abstract references to water sounds. The work has been performed in several festivals and concerts in Europe, Asia, North and South America
 www.jpoliveira.com 

Speakers
JP

João Pedro Oliveira

João Pedro Oliveira studied organ performance, composition and architecture in Lisbon. He completed a PhD in Composition at Stony Brook University. His music includes one chamber opera, several orchestral compositions, a Requiem, 3 string quartets, chamber music, solo instrumental music and electroacoustic music. He has received numerous prizes and awards, including three Prizes at the Bourges Electroacoustic Music Competition, the prestigious... Read More →
FO

Felipe Otondo

Felipe Otondo studied acoustics in Chile, where he started composing and performing music for experimental theatre and ran several performance projects with actors and musicians. In 1999, he moved to Denmark to undertake post-graduate studies in sound perception at Aalborg University, focusing on spatial sound and timbre perception. He studied composition at the Carl Nielsen Academy with Anders Brødsgaard, where he composed and performed various... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Stauffer B111 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

12:15pm

Lunch/Networking Events - Neeb Plaza
Lunch served in Neeb Plaza (Outside the Art School Building)

Saturday March 28, 2015 12:15pm - 1:30pm
Neeb Plaza 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

12:30pm

Long Time, No See?
Long Time, No See? is a new form of participatory, environmental futures project, designed for individuals and groups. It uses a smartphone app to guide processes of individual or group walking at any chosen location—encouraging walkers to think in radical new ways about how to best prepare for "stormy" environmental futures ahead. As part of their personal journeys, participants contribute site-specific micro-narratives in the form of texts, images and sounds, captured via the app during the loosely guided walk. These responses are then uploaded and synthesised into an ever-building audiovisual and generative artwork/"map" of future-thinking affinities, viewable both online at long-time-no-see.org (in Chrome) and at the same time on a large screen visualisations at QUT’s Cube Centre in Brisbane, Australia. The artwork therefore spans both participants’ mobile devices and laptops. Long Time, No See? has been developed over the past two years by a team of leading Australian artists, designers, urban/environmental planners and programmers.

The real-time visualisation software used in Long Time, No See? is programmed to draw together covalent ideas in order to evolve an imaginary universe of linked islands, set within an audiovisual storm. Common threads between users around "foundational questions" of ecology are highlighted and become the basis for online audiences' investigative navigations and interactions; these audiences are then invited to develop their own responses by conducting their own walks, causing the work to grow exponentially. In all of these ways the app and artwork prompt a rich imaging of each participant's relational engagements within the socio-ecological systems of which they are innately a part. The experience of walking with Long Time, No See? therefore offers conference participants and the general public powerful opportunities to develop and share their thinking around sustainability — demonstrating ‘care’ for the future of their community and beyond. The workshop will include an introduction from Keith Armstrong and a guided workshops around the ASU Campus.

Download the app and participate during Balance-Unbalance: http://explore.long-time-no-see.org/map 

Meet at the entrance to the Art School Building, near Neeb Plaza. 

Currently the APP runs only on iPhone or iPAD with 3G/4G Sim card.  (Wifi only ipads do work but will mean you can only walk within the reliable parts of the ASU network)

If you are on an Android phone please consider coming for the talk before regardless,  and then hopefully we can team you up for a walk with an iPhone/Ipad person and share a walk together

 



Speakers
KA

Keith Armstrong

Keith Armstrong has specialised for 18 years in collaborative, hybrid, new media works with an emphasis on innovative performance forms, site-specific electronic arts, networked interactive installations, alternative interfaces, public arts practices and art-science collaborations. His ongoing research focuses on how scientific and philosophical ecologies can both influence and direct the design and conception of networked, interactive media... Read More →
LC

Linda Carroli

Linda Carroli is a writer and urban practitioner. She has worked across community, communications and cultural contexts, and is currently working with Harbinger Consultants on a diverse range of planning, placemaking, engagement, and research projects. As an award-winning writer, she publishes in a range of media, both nationally and internationally. Linda is also the recipient of a Centenary Medal for "long and distinguished service in the... Read More →
RD

Roger Dean

Roger Dean is a researcher and a composer/improviser. His early research was in molecular cell biology, and since 1989 he has also been involved in musicology, particularly with reference to improvisation. Since 2007 his research focus has turned to music cognition and music computation (both analytic and generative). He also has extensive experience as an institution-builder, being a CEO for 18 years, first of the Heart Research Institute... Read More →
GS

Gavin Sade

Gavin Sade is a designer, educator and researcher in the field of interactive media, with a background in music and sonology, and is currently the Head of Interactive and Visual Design in the Creative Industries Faculty at the Queensland University of Technology. In 2003 he formed Kuuki, a creative media collective who have since exhibited works nationally and internationally. In 2011 Gavin won the QUT outstanding thesis award for his PhD... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Virtual/Online

1:00pm

The Listening Path II: Disparate Times and Places
The Listening Path II: Disparate Times and Places uses the practice of soundwalking to connect people in disparate places in a unified act of silent respect for our natural surroundings. This project entails two short site-specific soundwalks--in Tempe, AZ, and in Grinnell, IA—and online documentation of these listening paths will juxtapose the diverse soundscapes of two iconic American landscapes: the desert and the prairie. This project blends the historically significant act of silent marches organized in the wake of tragedy with the creative research practice of soundwalking. In weaving together these themes, the project suggests that communities separated by time and place can practice collective silence to listen to the land, to demonstrate respect for our unique local environments, and to raise awareness of the extraordinary environmental challenges we face. Visit the project online: https://sites.google.com/site/thelisteningpathii/home.

Meet at the entrance to the Art School Building, near Neeb Plaza.  

Speakers
AA

Abby Aresty

Sound artist Abby Aresty builds immersive, site-specific sound art installations in public spaces, creating unexpected, intentional, community listening contexts that examine the liminal spaces between our built environment and the natural world. Her recent work, Paths II: The Music of Trees, was featured in an interview with Melissa Block on NPR’s All Things Considered, and was hailed as ‘otherworldly,’ and ‘sometimes... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Virtual/Online

1:30pm

Resilience Keynote - Gary Lawrence and Niyanta Spelman

Live stream here

The Choice to Stay: Here and There

From her work in indigenous rainforest communities Niyanta Spelman has witnessed the way people’s lives are changing as a result of external pressures. Already struggling to adapt to the pressures of deforestation, local communities are now facing new threats from climate change with very unexpected consequences. Weather patterns are changing and the sources of food and income they have relied on for centuries are moving, changing or disappearing. What happens when forest people cannot live off the forest? What happens when their only source of income disappears? Where do they go? Can they go? Rainforest communities are struggling to find ways to maintain their way of life. Niyanta will illustrate the difficulty in choosing between potentially lucrative, short term gains and the obscured yet devastating long term consequences of those choices.

 

Back in the United States, Gary Lawrence has been in the front lines of the ideological struggle between scientific probability and society’s preferred reality. He will make the case that humanity, regardless of geographic location, is all in the same boat. There are important technical issues that need to be solved but the capacity of government and the ability of societies to make informed choices together will be the real challenge of our next generation. In the Rainforest and in Arizona communities are having to adapt to external stressors in ways they have never anticipated. These pressures come from changing natural patterns and from increased urbanization and population growth. The geographic context of Chipaota, Peru and Mesa, Arizona may be very different – but in both places societies and political leadership are having to adjust to something far outside their experience with no proven methods to rely upon.


Speakers
GL

Gary Lawrence

Gary Lawrence is Corporate Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer for AECOM Technology Corporation (NYSE: ACM), an $8-billion global provider of professional technical and management support services. AECOM’s 45,000 employees — including architects, engineers, designers, planners, scientists and management professionals — serve clients in more than 130 countries around the world. | | Mr. Lawrence leads AECOM’s sustainability... Read More →
NS

Niyanta Spelman

Niyanta Spelman is the founder and executive director of Rainforest Partnership whose missions is to protect tropical rainforests by partnering with people at global and local levels to create lasting solutions to deforestation. The Rainforest Partnerships visions is for a world in which tropical rainforests thrive and support a balanced, healthy planet.


Saturday March 28, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Stauffer B125 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

3:00pm

Coffee Break
Saturday March 28, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:30pm

Session 3 Panel Stream: Eco-Sensing in Higher Education Curriculum

Session 3 Panel Stream: Eco-Sensing in Higher Education Curriculum

Andrea Polli, Eric Leonardson, Linda Keane, Leah Barclay, Christopher Preissing, Lindsay French, and Meredith Hoy 
A conversation between an international group of academic practitioners and artists about the design and delivery of interdisciplinary curriculum in the arts, engineering and architecture that engages university students with listening and other forms of environmental sensing to promote creative ways to address ecological problems. Panelists will present examples and experiences using listening, field recording, sensors, data gathering, and other ways of sensing ecosystems. 

The single glance cannot sufficiently capture the fact that the environment is a complex ecological system formed by the intersection of both visible and invisible phenomena. Ubiquitous computing and data collection can provide a variety of non visual cross-sections through which a more complicated understanding of the environment can be experienced. When does the collection of a quantity of data becoming meaningful or useful for scientific and/or creative purposes? 

Sound provides a sensory framework that imparts depth and texture to the listener’s surroundings. It does not simply enrich the visual experience of landscape, according primacy to vision, but actively shapes the interaction between listener and environment. Sound collection, and its related data collection, complicate any single experience of environment as complete, and the observation of sound, as it is based in time, cannot exist without memory. Events are accumulated over time, and it is this accumulation that affects our observation, and perception of the environment. 

In digital art practice, the 1970s brought about an interest in the relationship between sound and space, and particularly, the use of sound as an augmentation of the primacy of visual representation. Sound was identified as a new form of location-based practice that could enrich the phenomenological experience of space and landscape. 

While visual maps create an instantaneous impression, sound maps create a richly textured, durational experience that refuses to foreclose the space in question. Sound maps are exploratory and open-ended, providing, as Schafer argues, only offered details, rather than a totalized view. As opposed to the tradition of landscape painting, which situates the viewer in a frontal relationship to a carefully enframed array of visual information, sound art affirms the materiality of the invisible world. It shows an environment to be a multi-layered, multi-sensory, and dynamic interplay of forces that cannot be encapsulated and circumscribed by the frame. 

Since the 1970s, the advancement of sound art has been heavily concerned with the material density of the sonic environment. Eco-sensing projects gather data and translate it into a sonic fabric that communicates informational content in alternative ways to traditional visualization practices. The phenomenological thickness of sonic presentation reveals the ways in which ecological data need not be merely visual to be interpreted and absorbed by the human sensorium. The complexity of sound mirrors the complexity of ecosystems and environment, demonstrating how environmental knowledge and understanding can develop through practices of sonifying data. 


Moderators
KG

Kate Galloway

Kate Galloway is a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at the Research Centre for the Study of Music, Media and Place at Memorial University of Newfoundland. Galloway works in the field of ecomusicology with interests in musics of the 20th/21st centuries, technology, and alternative performance practices and spaces. She is an active member of the AMS Ecocriticism Study Group and the SEM Ecomusicology Special Interest Group.

Speakers
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
LF

Lindsay French

Lindsey French is a Chicago-based artist and educator. Engaging in gestures of communication with landscapes and the nonhuman, her work spans a variety of media, including video, performance, audio sculpture, and generative literature. French has exhibited and presented work at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Chicago Cultural Center, the Pico House Gallery at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument in Los Angeles, and in... Read More →
LK

Linda Keane

Linda Keane, AIA, is an environmental designer, architect and academic, passionately active in greening public imagination. She combines architectural practice with animation, publications and workshops collaborating with diverse practices on envisioning projects that transform sustainable experiences. Co-founder of STUDIO 1032 with partner, Mark Keane, she contributes to ecological initiatives along the Milwaukee- Chicago corridor, including the... Read More →
EL

Eric Leonardson

Eric Leonardson is a Chicago-based audio artist, co-founder and Executive Director of the World Listening Project, founder and co-chair of the Midwest Society for Acoustic Ecology, and President of the World Forum for Acoustic Ecology. Leonardson is Adjunct Associate Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), teaching in the Department of Sound since 2002. He earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree (Visual Arts) at Northern... Read More →
AP

Andrea Polli

Andrea Polli is currently an Associate Professor of Art and Ecology with appointments in the College of Fine Arts and School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico.  She holds the Mesa Del Sol Endowed Chair of Digital Media and directs the Social Media Workgroup, a lab at the University's Center for Advanced Research Computing. She served as the founding Director of the Interdisciplinary Film and Digital Media Program and as... Read More →
CP

Christopher Preissing

Composer, improviser, and collaborator, Christopher Preissing earned DMA and MM degrees from the University of Illinois in Urbana where he studied with Herbert Brün, Salvatore Martirano, and William Brooks. Composer-in-residence at Beloit College, Guest Composer at The Latin American Music Center (Indiana University), Artist-in-Residence at the Ragdale Foundation, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Stauffer B125 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

3:30pm

Session 3 Paper Stream 1: Environmental Awareness in Urban Contexts Through Workshops and Sound and Media Art

Session 3 Paper Stream 1: Environmental Awareness in Urban Contexts Through Workshops and Sound and Media Art

Nina Czegledy: "DIY Water Sensing Workshop in an Urban Context"
Water decontamination is a central challenge in the 21st century. This applies not only to potable water but also to industrial process water, cooling water and swimming pools. The goal is environmentally sound disinfection that is also time-effective and cost efficient. We dispose of human and animal wastes and chemical substances into the environment at such a rate that even some of the largest lakes and river systems are seriously difficult to clean, to sustain life. Undoubtedly, this situation influenced the rise of many activist cultural and art projects linked to water & climate change. Several of these are presented outside the white cube of museum/gallery spaces. 

Three of us (Nina Czegledy, Adriana Ieraci, Antonio Gomba-Bari,) chose an alternate participatory workshop approach to address this issue. In May 2013 we co-organized the DIY Water Sensing workshop at Subtle Technologies Festival in Toronto. Our aim was: 
- to facilitate an activity fostering the discussion of environmental issues. 
- to engage the community in experimental analysis and monitoring of water quality 
- to engage participants in developing toolkits for testing 
We began by posing the question: Have you ever wondered where the water you drink, cook with, or shower in comes from? In Toronto, Lake Ontario (representing 1% of the world's total surface freshwater supply) is the only source of drinking water. Although Lake Ontario is impressively clean, before reaching households, it is filtered. How effectively? 

Following a thematic overview, David Lawrie of Citizen Scientists presented the volunteer group’s activities including ecological monitoring, environmental training and education. Ramon Guardans, pollution expert from Madrid, spoke on global water pollution. Participants brought water samples from their own homes and built take-home water kits to test chemical components in their water supply. 

The goal was to create a more informed understanding of our climate and environment - hopefully effecting positive societal change. In summary, we aimed to improve the literacy of workshop participants through active participation in experimental water sensing. We remain convinced that such workshops will eventually contribute to grassroots participation in governmental policy-making.
 
Alan Dormer: "The Recontextualization of Urban Spaces Through Site-Specific Sonic Interventionism"
This paper attempts to highlight and address issues relating to site-specific urban sound art and its relationship with a ‘sense of place’. Through both a theoretical and artistic framework the paper explores concepts of topophilia, insidedness, ambiences, place and non-place and how these theories may be applied within the field of site-specific urban sound art. 

Topophilia, as described by Tuan, “… is the affective bond between people and place or setting”. In what Auge describes as a world of super modernity, this bond - particularly within urban spaces - is disappearing, leaving what can be described as non-places, places that are void of meaning and definition acquired through human activity and social practice. “Place ignored, unseen, or unknown” (Lippard). 

In many of our urban spaces a sense of place or ‘genius loci’ has been lost due to sensory overload; our sonic environments and soundscapes have become something we avoid rather than listen to. Dixon proclaims our evolution from hunter-gatherer: “learning though listening” to “learnt listening” has led to a “switching off, tuning out” attitude of urban users. 

Site-specific sound installations allow for the reconceptualization of space through sonic relocation or interventionism. Within the spatial boundaries in which the work exists a new space is created. The transformation of sound into a spatio-temporal entity not only changes the way in which we experience the sonic material but also our relationship with the space of the work's existence through “sonic articulation” or the “conditioning of space” (Minard). The result is that the work becomes part of the space and restructures its organization both conceptually and perceptually (Serra). 

Discussing urban artists from various fields, along with recent works by the author, the paper will highlight how a greater understanding of our relationship with the spaces and places we inhabit and traverse through can lead toward a better lived environment and social experience. 


Moderators
TP

Thomas Puleo

Thomas J Puleo is an assistant professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University. A geographer by training, he studies the roles that landscapes play in the resilience of places at multiple scales (personal, municipal, national, global). Because landscapes mediate multiple processes (economic, political, social, cultural, historical, technological, environmental), he takes a transdisciplinary approach to... Read More →

Speakers
NC

Nina Czegledy

Nina Czegledy, artist, curator, and educator, works internationally on collaborative art & science & technology projects. The changing perception of the human body and its environment as well as paradigm shifts in the arts inform her projects.  She has exhibited and published widely, won awards for her artwork, and has initiated, led and participated in workshops, forums and festivals worldwide at international events. | | Her... Read More →
AD

Alan Dormer

Alan is currently undertaking a PhD in the University of Limerick, Ireland, where he is investigating the role sound plays in the shaping and creation of place. In conjunction with research, his practice, which is primarily site-specific sound art, deals with everyday places and sounds. Concerned with the eradication of place and an increase in placelessness and non-place, works often use the history of the site through acoustic memory in an... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Stauffer B111 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

3:30pm

Session 3 Paper Stream 2: Water, Sight and Song
Session 3 Paper Stream 2: Water, Sight and Song

Mitch Goodwin: "The Liquid Electric"
The representation of a life sustaining force, either of technological or natural means, has a deep and evocative history in some of our most elaborate cultural fantasies. Embedded in the fictitious dreamscapes of cinema, advertising and media art are the foundational principles of an emergent digital aesthetics of liquid. The art direction is often blue and luminous in tone, it is always found at the core of the film’s novum, and it often takes on a kinetic electrical form. It is as if these cultural artifacts - reaching back to the earliest uses of CGI, such as Disney’s 1982 film Tron and on to more recent Hollywood parables such as A.I. and Avatar – recognize the very Gothic anxiety we hold for our environment in the twilight years of industrialization. Appearing in all manner of image constructions, the liquid electric is presented as the source code - the host, the conductor, the origin – of our very human struggle with technology and evolving notions of artificiality. It has emerged from a place of darkness, this liquid energy, stylized as a predominately luminous surface texture contrasted most commonly against a narrative setting of loss and foreboding. Very much like the anxiety we feel for the contemporary perils of creeping urbanization, of resource exploitation and climate instability, the liquid electric operates in a contested space where the usual laws of physics, logic and nature have become unstable. 

This light-on-dark aesthetic has a somewhat deeper history. It is a technique once used by the Italian Futurists and the imagineers such as Thomas Edison and Norman Bel Geddes to promote the wonders of technology and electrification – sometimes with troubling and unwanted consequences. However, it is now being exploited by a new breed of digital artisans to foreground the perils of resource scarcity, to question the ubiquity of virtual networks and to interrogate the rise of the machine in a fragile imbalanced ecosystem. Indeed there is a discernible influence of machine vision at work here, and theorists such as Foucault, and, more presently, Paul Virilio and Zygmunt Bauman, have noted its ubiquitous rise. Most certainly it is strongly felt in the data visualizations emerging from the ATLAS observer at CERN, in the animations of NASA and in the marketing iconography of device technology and software, but there is something else at work here too. It is as if this liquid – this essence of life – is speaking, indeed screaming, through our mediated cultural artifacts. Perhaps through our fictions can we truly grasp the gravity of our most dire realities? It would seem that the liquid electric is not just an aesthetic turn or a narrative device but an explicit visual sign – nature’s digital avatar – reminding the audience of the precarity of existence in both the realms of the virtual and the real. 

Carolyn Monastra: "Photography and Climate Action"
For over a century, artists have used photography to draw attention to and generate change around social and environmental issues. Examples of such work include Lewis Hines’ portraits of children in factories that helped establish child labor laws; Walker Evans’ and Dorothea Lange’s pictures of Dust Bowl tenant farmers in support of the Farm Security Administration; the landscapes of William Henry Jackson, Carlton Watkins, and Ansel Adams that helped create national parks; and Martha Rosler’s “House Beautiful: Bringing the War Home” photo-collages that served as both a commentary and protest on the Vietnam and Gulf Wars.

Photography’s role as document and catalyst in today’s climate crisis is no exception. While hard to quantify in terms of hard data, the public’s attitude toward the natural world is a key factor in the environmental movement. Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, recognizes the importance of the photographic image and has made pictures an integral part of the organization since its inception. He has referred to their Flickr repository of over 55,000 images as “a powerful recruiting tool”. Although most people now know that photographs can lie, many still believe—and artists inherently know—that “a picture is worth a thousand words.” 

This paper questions and explores the role and efficacy of photography as both a document of climate change and a stimulus to influence public opinion and policy. Since it is impossible to photograph the rise of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, let alone see it, artists and environmentalists need to be creative with their depictions of climate disruptions to overcome denial and create action. Using work by a variety of artists, as well as organizations like 350.org and The Climate Reality Project, this paper highlights projects that focus on water—both too much (melting ice, rising seas, extreme storms, flooding) and too little (drought, desertification). With millions of people already affected by drought and millions more expected to be displaced by sea level rise, understanding how photography has successfully addressed water-related climate issues may provide insight into using inventive approaches to documenting and catalyzing change around other climate and environmental issues.

Michael Silvers: "Voices of Drought: Brazilian Popular Song and the Mediation of Climate in the 20th Century"
Drought is a defining characteristic of the northeastern region of Brazil. It is both a devastating environmental reality and a complex discourse related to local beliefs, systems of inequality, and depictions of the region’s landscape and climate in literature, visual art, and music. In particular, music has played a central role in constructing an image of the drought-ridden Northeast in the mainstream Brazilian consciousness in the twentieth century. Mainstream, popular recorded songs, which primarily reached the ears and minds of Brazilian audiences through the radio and television, have addressed the issue of drought in a number of ways. In this paper, I examine four types of songs about drought: pleas for aid, prayers for rain, drought laments, and nostalgic pastorals. I also uncover how these song types relate to the sociopolitical history of Brazil and the changing nature of the Brazilian music industry. Songs such as “Vozes da Seca” (Voices of Drought; 1953) and “Orós Precisa de Nós” (Orós Needs Us; 1960) directly request aid from a national audience. “Súplica Cearense” (Cearense Supplication; 1960) and “Pedido a São João” (Request from St. John; 1953) are religious prayers for rain. Songs such as “Pobres Flagelados” (Plagued Poor; 1915) and “O Castigo da Seca” (The Punishment of Drought; 1962) lament the hardships of drought. “Luar do Sertão” (Moonlight of the Backlands; 1914) and “Aquarela Nordestina” (Northeastern Watercolor; 1959) exemplify nostalgic songs about the region’s landscape for and by migrants who had fled the region. Engaging ecomusicological and ethnomusicological scholarship on popular music and environmental protest, nostalgia, and traditional ecological knowledge, this paper will explore how recorded, popular music about drought simultaneously reflected and shaped sociocultural processes, regional identity, and the experience of drought in twentieth century Brazil. 

Moderators
TS

Ted Solis

Ethnomusicologist Ted Solís is Professor of Music. He holds a BA in Music History and Literature from ASU, an MA in Ethnomusicology from the University of Hawaii-Manoa, and the PhD in Music from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. He has carried out field research in Northern India, Mexico, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. A member of ASU\'s School of Music since 1989, he directs the School of Music\'s Latin Marimba band \"Marimba... Read More →

Speakers
MG

Mitch Goodwin

Mitch Goodwin is a digital media artist and academic of 15 years’ experience. He is the Founding Director of the Screengrab International Media Arts Award and curator of the associated exhibition program. He recently received a commendation for academic excellence for his PhD project, "Dark Euphoria: The Neo-Gothic Narrative of Millennial Technoculture," a visual communication study of emergent forms of visual trauma in contemporary image... Read More →
CM

Carolyn Monastra

A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Carolyn Monastra received her MFA in photography from The Yale School of Art. For the past fifteen years her work has focused on creating and discovering mystery in the natural world. Artist residencies at The Djerassi Foundation, Blue Mountain Center, and the Saltonstall Foundation have given her inspirational environments in which to create her work. After being on a residency at the Skaftfell Visual Arts Center... Read More →
MS

Michael Silvers

Michael Silvers is an assistant professor of ethnomusicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is currently writing a book called Voices of Drought: Forró Soundscapes in Northeastern Brazil and is a member of the editorial board of the Ecomusicology Newsletter.


Saturday March 28, 2015 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Art 220 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

3:30pm

Session 3 Paper Stream 3: Stewardship of Place Through the Arts
Session 3 Paper Stream 3: Stewardship of Place Through the Arts

Abby Aresty: "Sound, Community, Place: Reflections on Sound Art in Urban Parks as a Tool for Enhancing Community Appreciation of Shared, Natural Urban Spaces"
A deeply felt connection to place can motivate community efforts to protect local environments. But while purposeful listening is a powerful tool for building such connections, the machine noise that pervades urban parks’ soundscapes often discourages visitors from actively listening to their environment. In this paper, I therefore consider temporary, site-specific sound art as a promising addition to traditional noise management approaches, and particularly emphasize the purposeful listening such projects engender as a tool for engaging communities with local, shared natural spaces. As a case study, I outline the inspiration for, creation, and reception of Paths II: The Music of Trees, a sound art project installed in Seattle’s Washington Park Arboretum in October 2012. I analyze the implementation and reception of this work to examine how sound art can build positive community listening experiences by inviting visitors to explore familiar spaces in unfamiliar ways.

Tomiko Jones: "Engaging the Landscape: Transitional Places"
In this media presentation I outline temporary art projects. In site-responsive installation, I build immersive environments using existing features of the landscape as the starting point and add elements of sculpture, photography, video, light, audio and performance. These investigations bring up questions of the role of stewardship. Uncovering the West Tributary (2010), commissioned by the City of Bellevue, Washington, drew attention to a devastated urban salmon stream. Progressive city planners proposed to “day light” the piped stream and restore the damaged wetland to create ecological stability and build public greenways. I worked with the city’s lead biologist and obtained video footage of the salmon runs to weave into the outdoor projections. The video and environmental installation Canal (2013), commissioned by Scottsdale Public Art, Arizona, was made in response to the Salt River Project with implications of the Arizona Canal, drinking water for the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, and speaks to the politics of water in the west. 

Quietly significant moments are found in transitional places between land and water, destruction and reclamation, language and thought. In fall 2013 I received the En Foco New Works Fellowship to complete Rattlesnake Lake (exhibited 2014, ongoing), a long-term photographic project in the Cedar River Watershed, Washington State. Earlier images at Rattlesnake Lake were made exclusively with Type 55 4x5 Polaroid negatives. I collected water to clear the film, as an invitation of the lake to merge physically into the image. As materials have changed or become extinct, I adapted my process. The platinum/palladium appealed to me with the alchemy of precious metals, while the medium and scale of the prints were referential of photography’s historical role in geological surveys, western expansionism, and notions of territory and ownership.

Arthur Sabatini and Pete Wyer: "Time Structure Mapping: On Pete Wyer's Music, Sound, Places, Performances, and Reimaginings" 
Over the past decade, composer Pete Wyer has devised a compositional process called Time Structured Mapping (TSM) that has resulted in a series of works that engage natural sound, acoustic environments, sound/music and technology, cross-cultural communication, participation and place. (pmwmusic.com). With an interlocutor, Pete Wyer will outline his TSM as aesthetic research projects and reflect on global sound environments, creative responses and sonic ecologies. Among the works he will discuss (and play samples from) are: Simultaneity Works that involve recordings at the same time in different locations. These include, NYC Circle, made in Columbus Circle, NYC that mapped a circumference that passed through buildings and around the periphery of Columbus Circle, all playing back across multiple speakers. Other projects were: Four Bridges, which simultaneously engaged musician in London, Frankfort, Boston and Mumbai; and World Time, where recordings worldwide were produced that indicated specific mention of time (bells, alarms, loud speakers, etc). A more current work is Rain at Night, which is a monologue that follows the journey of water in specific locations. Future projects are planned. Such performance events and aesthetic research – raise questions about sonic geographies, aural pattern, uses of technology, urban sound and social participation, and reimaginings and creative methods for approaching understanding the sonic ‘balance/unbalance’ in today’s world. This will be the focus of this conversation between the speakers and the audience. 

Moderators
avatar for Tyler Kinnear

Tyler Kinnear

University of British Columbia
Tyler Kinnear is a PhD candidate in musicology at the University of British Columbia. His work focuses on contemporary art music, with particular interest in conceptualizations of nature, modes of listening, improvisation, alternative performance spaces, and music technology. Tyler serves on the editorial board for the Ecomusicology Newsletter and is an active member of the Ecocriticism Study Group fo the American Musicological Society. In... Read More →

Speakers
AA

Abby Aresty

Sound artist Abby Aresty builds immersive, site-specific sound art installations in public spaces, creating unexpected, intentional, community listening contexts that examine the liminal spaces between our built environment and the natural world. Her recent work, Paths II: The Music of Trees, was featured in an interview with Melissa Block on NPR’s All Things Considered, and was hailed as ‘otherworldly,’ and ‘sometimes... Read More →
TJ

Tomiko Jones

Tomiko Jones was born in Los Angeles, California, grew up along the Pacific Rim, and currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. Her work is linked to the identity of place in social, cultural and geographical terms, and she explores transitions in the landscape along water passageways with attention on public lands. Jones received her Master of Fine Arts in Photography with a Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Arizona... Read More →
AS

Arthur Sabatini

Arthur J. Sabatini is an Associate Professor of Performance Studies in the Interdisciplinary Arts and Performance Department at Arizona State University. Dr. Sabatini holds a PhD from the Department of Performance Studies, New York University. His areas of specialization include: Avant-Garde and Experimental Art, 20t/21st Century Theory and Aesthetic Research. He has been involved in new music and performance, principally with the... Read More →
PW

Pete Wyer

Pete M. Wyer is a leading British composer who is known for his orchestral scores, opera, choral, ballet, and jazz works. Pete’s portfolio is varied and includes music for the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Juilliard Academy, Royal Opera House, English National Ballet and the London Symphony Orchestra, as well as original work for BBC TV and Radio Three. Pete is also known for innovative approaches that enable combinations of improvisation... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Art 246 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

5:15pm

Solar Soundwalk
Meet outside the Stauffer B building under the breezeway. 

During the past few years, Scott Smallwood has embarked on an experimental practice of designing solar powered instruments. These instruments are designed to utilize available energy using raw solar energy with no battery buffering, creating an opportunity to interface with environmental conditions in outdoor soundscapes. At specified times during the conference, Scott will lead a soundwalk involving a solarsonic improvisation using these instruments. Conference attendees are invited to participate as improvisors and/or listeners during these outdoor sessions.

Speakers
SS

Scott Smallwood

Scott Smallwood was born in Dallas, Texas, and grew up at 10,000 feet in elevation in the Colorado Rockies. At the age of 10, his father gave him a cassette tape recorder, and ever since, he has been fascinated by the possibilities of recorded sound. He listens and makes recordings and observations of places and objects, and draws the resulting sounds into compositions and performances. Ranging from sonic photographs, studio compositions... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 5:15pm - 5:45pm
Stauffer B 1st floor hallway 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Art Exhibit: Old Graduate Sculpture Studio
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm, March 22-29. 

Fecundity
Bob Vanderbob

Fecundity: 1. the ability to cause or assist healthy growth; 2. the ability to produce offspring; 3. the creative power of the mind or imagination

Will the fecundity of our minds come to the rescue of biological fecundity? Will we collapse and go extinct, or adapt, survive and thrive? It is a delicate balance.

On one hand, the natural systems that sustain human activity are stretched to their limit. Biodiversity is dwindling. We humans are increasingly prey to fertility problems, due to the accumulation of pollution in our bodies. On the other, our understanding of biosystems is exploding. We are decoding nature’s fundamental processes at an accelerating pace with the help of the exponential rise in computing power. 

Whereas our ancestors conjured up potent fertility deities associated with pregnancy, birth, life, rainfall, harvest, love, sex and beauty, the dry and abstract vocabulary we use today in relation to fecundity is not exactly rousing: 'the environment', 'sustainability', 'biodiversity'...

With this installation, Bobvan proposes a mythological, poetic experience, a revitalization of the age-old archetype encompassing the nested metaphorical meanings of the notion of fecundity to include the agility of the mind and the potential of the imagination. 

The installation is inspired by a Neolithic fecundity figure found in Harappa, in the Indus Valley.

A 3D-printed female figure in unsmoothed low-poly, a metaphor for the human species as an ongoing work in progress, is balanced on her head. She becomes a screen onto which are projected images of life, energy, water, bacteria, sperm and ovules, electronic patterns, genetic and binary code. The modern-day 'power' icon is projected onto her skull, reminiscent of Neolithic representations of the vulva, a universal fecundity symbol. In stark contrast, images of desert landscapes in video negative and of Venus, Earth's barren sister planet, are projected onto the back wall. The whole installation is enshrined in a large mirror box, evoking the ongoingness of the universe-as-process by reflecting the fecundity figure ad infinitum in all directions. 

Fecundity is part of Bobvan's Artificial Mythology project; it is presented at Balance-Unbalance as a world premiere. 

ArtLAB Mobile ECO-STUDIO

Mobile Eco Studio is a social art project involving artist-led workshops, planting indigenous species in unused bits of land. It integrates indigenous culture, biology, and community engagement, and adds a unique approach to the related subjects of climate and culture. Its special relationship to the climate and culture of Arizona will help visitors at the conference become more familiar with this unique place and ecosystem.


Speakers
MG

Matt Garcia

Matt Garcia is an interdisciplinary artist maintaining a socially engaged practice exploring the intersection of technology and society. Much of Garcia's work investigates the subjectivity of dry land ecology, place and visual culture. In 2009, Garcia founded DesertArtLAB, a social art initiative engaging systems of community and ecology in US desert regions. DesertArtLAb projects have been exhibited, screened and presented nationally and... Read More →

Artists
BV

Bob Vanderbob

Bob Vanderbob, a.k.a. Bobvan, is an artist and composer based in Brussels (Belgium). He explores the interaction between art, mythology, science, and science-fiction to convey his poetic vision of the techno-human condition. He calls his project Artificial Mythology, a matrix of mythological modules, a modern myth-scape for the current context of technological acceleration.
DA

Desert ArtLAB

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary initiative dedicated to a public art practice exploring connections between ecology, technology, and community. Through multimedia performance, food practice, and visual and social art, desert ArtLAB seeks to inform a discourse of desert urban landscapes, while challenging residents to consider how native ecology can inform identity, equality and resilience in our desert culture and... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Old Graduate Sculpture Studio 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

6:00pm

Balance-Unbalance 2015: EcoQuantum 2.0
This exhibit is open 6:00-9:00 pm March 22-29.

Robotanic Mobile Gardens--Soybots III
Shannon McMullen & Fabian Winkler

Climate, energy, agriculture, politics: the project Robotanic Mobile Gardens – SoyBots III belongs to a series of art installations and discursive interventions, collectively focused on critical gardening strategies which demonstrate just how deeply entangled these conditions are. In the global context, soybean production is at the heart of both climate change problems and suggested solutions to food security issues. Thus, soybean plants are mobilized for their significance to global food production, their strong association with a hybridity between nature and technology —in this case as a result of biotechnological strategies for increasing crop yields through genetic modification—and vulnerability to changing climate and water conditions as a result of global warming. 

Gardens express ideas and social relations; some are sites where art and technology produce material realities, social narratives and visualize politics. In this case, mobile gardens unite code, robotics and soybean plants (robotanics) to create a speculative interactive installation that suggests questions about climate, place and agriculture implicated in contemporary practices and values. As self-pollinating organisms in combination with a light-seeking mobile robotic platform, temperature and moisture sensors, soybean plants metaphorically address the evolving interdependence between humans and cultivated crops and the underlying political nature of photosynthesis. 

These relationships are expressed through three autonomous robotic platforms, outfitted with custom planter boxes containing soybean plants, that roam interior space in search of optimal light conditions and ideal temperatures while monitoring soil moisture to promote plant growth in local conditions. To identify optimal light conditions, the robot host employs a phototropic control strategy, using sensors to track and follow sunlight intensity or to locate LED grow lights. Moisture sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller trigger a flashing yellow light when moisture levels are too low, prompting humans to attend to the plants. Finally, temperature sensors are similarly used to allow the soybeans to indicate their need for increased or decreased warmth. ‘Shivering’ indicates a need for higher temperatures. In contrast, the robot will seek dimmer locations when it is too warm. With SoyBots III, soybeans become an ‘evocative object’ (Turkle, 2011) – something that can provoke reflection, speculation and attract emotion.  

Resounding Mulgrave
John Mackay, John Wedgwood Clarke, Tariq Emam

Resounding Mulgrave explores the post-industrial landscape of Port Mulgrave, north of Scarborough, UK. It was one of three artistic interventions exploring and reinterpreting the Rotunda Museum, Scarborough (created by the father of modern geology, William Smith). It was commissioned by Scarborough Museums Trust as part of the Dictionary Stone project curated by Lara Goodband, and supported by Arts Council, England. 

The work was a collaboration between poet John Wedgwood Clarke and sound artist Rob Mackay, with technical and artistic support from Tariq Emam (video/performance). 

"There’s a fossil shell by my foot the colour and texture of grey opaque glass, perfectly moulded, complete with a scallop’s bow and ridges. Right next to it, but 183 million years later, there’s a limpet. The gap in time between the two doesn’t seem to exist, but I know that it does."(John Wedgwood Clarke) 

This awareness of the silent, pre-human gap between our present and geological past motivated our exploration of the coast between Port Mulgrave and Staithes. We used words and sound, both found and structured, to play within this silence and make connections between the ‘pastoral’, the ‘sublime’, and the history that has flowed from the smelting of the ironstone for which this stretch of the North Yorkshire coast is geologically famous. 

Our lives and cultures are shaped by the rocks under the soil. Our post-industrial ruins are part of the on-going geology as well as history of the area: the mine workings between Port Mulgrave and Staithes are fossil burrows in the making. We hope that we’ve evoked something of this haunting place, and the way it provokes awareness that we’re a species among other species, dangling by a thread. 

This work was originally installed at Scarborough’s Rotunda Museum from 5th June - 14th July 2014. It consisted of an 8-channel sound installation, a 6-screen video installation, and 2 display cases containing rock and fossil specimens, along with 6 small-screen video loops.

Words for Water
Tracey Benson

Words for Water explores a diversity of languages, including Indigenous Australian languages, as a starting point to evoke a connection to water as the sustaining element of all life. Indigenous cultures have an acute understanding of and connection to the relationship between body, environment (site) and identity, and this project seeks to awaken this connection more broadly across cultures and practices.

Words for Water is an exploration into the many aspects of the chemical of H2O. Water makes up over 70 percent of the human body; it is essential for sustaining life and has massive social and cultural significance.

Water may seem ubiquitous, but it has some rather uncommon properties. At the atomic level, water can influence how life and landscapes are formed, such as how water moves through a plant and how rivers meander around bends. It is also the only chemical that be formed in three states – vapour, liquid and solid.

This project uses a range of mixed reality media approaches – the use of augmented media to ‘trigger’ sound and video, the development of a smart phone/tablet app, gallery and installation based exhibitions, and a projection work that bring this project together in a filmic, linear narrative.

Words for Water is seen as an ever-expanding project, allowing for infinite expansion of words, thoughts and stories related to water. The project has appeared at SCANZ2015, New Plymouth, New Zealand; Photoacess, October 2014; 3WDS14, Waterwheel World Water Day Symposium, March 2014; and Stage One of Words for Water was presented as part of the Transreal Topologies exhibition at the Royal Institute of Science in Adelaide, October 2013, held in conjunction with the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR).


Artists
FW

Fabian Winkler

Fabian Winkler is an artist working at the intersections of the moving image, sound, spatial structures and robotics. He explores the aesthetic potential and the cultural implications of seemingly well-known artifacts through the use of new technologies. Conceptually, his works are often influenced by archeological research into the history of technology and observations of social processes. Winkler is currently an Associate Professor of Visual... Read More →
JW

John Wedgwood Clarke

Dr. John Wedgwood Clarke lectures in creative writing at the University of Hull. In 2012-13 he was Leverhulme Poet in Residence in the marine biology department at the University of Hull. He regularly works with curators, scientists and artists on public art projects, and is currently completing an Arts Council-funded writing project about rubbish. His first full collection, Ghost Pot (2013), was described as ‘a masterpiece that deserves... Read More →
RM

Rob Mackay

Rob Mackay is a composer, sound artist and performer. Currently, he is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Music Technology at the University of Hull. He is the director of the ‘Sounds of Our Surroundings’ research group (http://icpcluster.org/page/sounds-of-oursurroundings). | | Prizes and honours include: IMEB Bourges (1997 and 2001); EAR99 from Hungarian Radio (1999); Confluencias (2003); and La Muse en Circuit (2004 and 2006). His... Read More →
SM

Shannon McMullen

Shannon McMullen is a jointly appointed Assistant Professor in the Electronic and Time-Based Art Program in the School of Visual and Performing Arts and in American Studies at Purdue University. She received a PhD in sociology from the University of California, San Diego, in 2007. Based on her fieldwork experience and dissertation writing in the areas of visual and material culture, Dr. McMullen has developed a creative practice that... Read More →
TE

Tariq Emam

Tariq Emam is researching towards a PhD in Music by Composition at the University of Hull, having been awarded one of the institution’s first interdisciplinary PhD scholarships. He is working with the soundscape of the Yorkshire Dales, grounding his work on an archive of sounds recorded there 40 years ago. By merging old and new data, he aims to develop a soundscape monitoring system that evokes both the natural and anthropogenic... Read More →
TB

Tracey Benson

Tracey Benson is a green geek/artist/researcher into connected communities, UX, WCAG, Gov.2.0, sustainability, tech/art synergies, maps and FOSS. Tracey has been active in a number of media arts communities: in 2007, she co-founded the Canberra chapter of dorkbot with Alexandra Gillespie and was also a moderator on the internationally renowned new media list –empyre- from 2005-07. She has participated in many international digital media... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Grant Street Atrium 605 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

6:00pm

Gala Banquet
The Conference Banquet will include several musical performances and a short film preview:

Paysage Marin Avec Bateaux Et Hydravion  by Antonio D’Amato 
"Paysage marin avec bateaux et hydravion" is a short piece or a sound miniature inspired by the World Soundscape Project. As a consequence of this approach natural and urban sounds, but also sounds from machines and labour can be effectively employed to compose music, after the discovery and recognition of musicality in the whole world. Not casually the opening quotation above is taken from the reference book The Soundscape: Our Sonic Environment and the Tuning of the World by R.M. Schafer.

The piece includes nature and ambient sounds, filtered, modified and re-organized. Those elements are used to build up a short music piece. Sound elements, both natural and derived from the engine or the machinery of a vessel are elaborated, mixed and overlapped several times in order to give birth to an evocative sound landscape. The take-off sound of a seaplane becomes the fundamental note of the last ending chord.

In a certain sense the goal of this short work is to bring forth the voices of the things and their aesthetic value, but not through a documentary approach. The underlying question is:“could the whole world be seen and manipulated as a protean musical instrument?” 

Forest by Garth Paine
This musical composition is part of a series of works that Garth Paine describes as "improvised conversations" with nature. In "Forest," Dr. Paine plays a flute that is electronically reprocessed with bird song recorded at Bundanon in Australia and frogs recorded in Arizona in a kind of real-time call and response, an example  of what he says is "an ongoing inquiry into the ways in which we converse with nature on a daily basis." 


RACING EXTINCTION - Film Preview
Scientists predict that the human footprint on the planet may cause the loss of half of the world’s species by the end of the century. They believe we have entered the sixth major extinction in Earth’s history, following the fifth great extinction which took out the dinosaurs. Our era is called the Anthropocene, or “Age of Man,” because evidence shows that humanity has sparked a cataclysmic change of the world’s natural environment and animal life. Yet, we are the only ones who can stop the change we have created.

The Oceanic Preservation Society (OPS), the group behind the Academy Award®-winning film THE COVE, is back with the new groundbreaking documentary RACING EXTINCTION. Joined by new innovators, OPS brings a voice to the thousands of species teetering on the very edge of life.

This highly charged, impassioned collective of activists is out to expose the two major threats to endangered wild species across the globe. The first comes from the international wildlife trade, and the bogus medicinal cures and tonics that are marketed to the public at the expense of creatures who have survived on this planet for millions of years. The second threat is all around us, hiding in plain sight. It is a hidden world of carbon emissions and acidified oceans that are incompatible with existing animal life. It is a world, revealed with state-of-the-art photographic technology, that oil and gas companies don’t want us to see.

Director Louie Psihoyos has crafted an ambitious mission to clearly and artfully pull into focus our impact on the planet, while inspiring us all to embrace the solutions that will ensure a thriving, biodiverse world for future generations.

At Balance-Unbalance 2015, we are pleased to screen a short preview of RACING EXTINCTION prior to the global release in late 2015. The film’s director, Louie Psihoyos, says “Film can still be the most powerful weapon in the world — a weapon of mass construction. I’m interested in radically changing how people perceive a documentary by making it entertaining and using narrative filmmaking conventions. In our new film, RACING EXTINCTION, we used the highest quality production values and a collective of environmental activists to raise awareness of the issue.” 

For information about the campaign against species extinction and to join this global movement please visit: www.racingextinction.com.


Speakers
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →

Artists
AD

Antonio D’Amato

He is intoxicated by music. He graduated at conservatory in Piano, Harpsichord, Music for multimedia, Music pedagogy and Electronic music. He also studied composition for eight years, bassoon for three years, baroque organ and audio engineering. In 2010 he was Ondes | Balance-Unbalance2015 International Conference, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA 2015 Page 1 of 2 | Paysage marin avec bateaux et hydravion. Author Name: Antonio... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 6:00pm - 9:30pm
Old Main 400 E. Tyler Mall, Tempe, AZ 85287

7:00pm

Night Gallery
The Night Gallery will be open 6:00-9:00, March 19-29 (closed Mondays). 


Night Gallery Exhibit
Curators: Muriel Magenta and Meredith Hoy
Exhibition Coordinator: Anne Brye

Prone to Collapse
Beth Weinstein & Ellen McMahon


In the last decade the Southwestern United States has lost more than 20% of its conifer forests. A group of scientists based at the University of Arizona is working to understand why trees are dying so they can better predict what will happen in the future. One of their primary tools for determining the extent and effects of forest die-off (also known as conifer collapse) is hemispherical photography. These 360-degree fisheye images are taken in forests at different stages of mortality to determine the increased amount of radiant energy (sunlight) hitting the earth’s surface as trees die. This information is critical to their study, which reveals that, added to drought and beetle infestation, the slight increase in global temperature due to greenhouse gas emissions has created the fatal tipping point.

Prone to Collapse is a new work developed from ongoing scientific research and several months of creative research and reflection on the raw material. As an installation it re-presents and re-contextualizes the hemispherical photographs used by these scientists in an immersive, sensory experience.

Animated hemispheric photographs are projected onto a scrim suspended within an installation made of repurposed materials derived from trees. Viewers are invited to recline within the installation to experience the transition from lush healthy forests through death and disappearance. As a complement to the embodied sensing of the issues, info-graphics convey critical information about the research and the implications of the scientists’ findings. By combining the multisensory visceral experience of lying in a forest as it dies and the conveyed graphic information, the collaborators seek to create conditions to awaken people to the problem of forest die-off, become receptive to learning about it, and become inclined to take action.

Polar View 
Cecily Culver


I am submitting a digital video installation, digital prints and three sculptures that are a part of the same body of work that uses Polar Pop cups to consider the point of view of a thing that is celebrated for its function in hydrating humans. However, they are disregarded beyond their use-life, despite making a significant contribution to the contamination of the environment. These works call into question the life of things, materials like expanded polystyrene foam, environmentalism and the cost of our anthropocentrism.

Polar View is a nine-channel video exploring a day in the life of a 44-ounce Expanded Polystyrene cup--more specifically, a “Polar Pop” from the Circle K convenience store. From the point of purchase to its eventual toss into the rubbish pile, Polar View presents multiple viewpoints from the oculus of a mundane part of our reality. Despite being ubiquitous, the existence, and moreover, the agency, of these cups is easily looked over. Polar View points at the life of a particular thing that is clearly an active player in our world.

The sculptures abstract a Polar Pop straw and lid, integrating it with the environment as if the disregarded rubbish has evolved to blend with the environment; in one it stares down at the viewer as if prompting him or her to take a sip. Polar View includes a series of digital prints from the video. Polar View was shown in the Juried MFA Summer show in the Harry Wood Gallery at the ASU Tempe campus in the summer of 2014. 

Drainage 
Dannon Schroeder


From the very first existence of humankind, an ongoing fragility between man and nature has been stretched and strained like a rubber band. Not completely snapping in two, the balance has been sustainable thus far. The human need to rely on nature for its abundance of resources exposes the weaknesses and strengths of our existence. The examination of human perspective towards the natural world has been a progressive tool for cognitive development since the origin of our species.

Drainage is a fine art exhibition/installation displaying intricately crafted wood sculptures that both visually and conceptually address many of the key topics presented at the Balance-Unbalance 2015 Conference. Created within this past year, these artworks resonate with deeply rooted references to ecology, biology and sociobiology. The sculptures directly address topics such as water access and sustainability, climate change, environmental awareness, and urban growth. The work has been crafted using locally salvaged woods and desert foliage, as well as reclaimed hardwoods.

Drainage infuses delicate natural forms with highly manipulated wood surface finishes that mimic constructed/casted metals. The striking contrast may not seem so striking to all as the viewer reflects on how their personal interaction with the natural world correlates with the artwork displayed in front of them.

Desert Breeze
James White


This installation, simply put, is of two sloop-rigged sailboats with neon and argon sails, competing on a sea of loose white sand. Sand rills are in the configuration of fingerprints. The whole installation is constructed on two 4’ x 8’ black platforms, which are horizontal to the floor.

The relationship between the rills of desert sand and the rills of the ocean floor are self-evident. The “competing” boats are healing over as they “ride” the desert or ocean breeze, a familiar sight to anyone who has sailed or observed sailing and its constant balance between tipping and forward motion across the waves.

The neon and argon in the luminous sails are uniquely powered by high frequency radio waves to eliminate wires, with light transmitted up through the mast, emitted fiber-optically onto the edges and surface engravings of the polycarbonate transparent sails.

The fingerprint reference is one of humanity and identity, caught up in competitive adventures, whether it be between individuals or between man and his environment. This piece is best displayed without gallery lighting or much external light, as the neon creates its own light and shadows.

This sculpture is the latest in a 45-year exploration of light and its relationship to human activity. This sculpture has been displayed at the Arizona State University Night Gallery in Tempe.

Planets
Mary Hood


Planets is a suite of eight images created in 2010, in which water is pooling, overflowing, diverting and escaping. The water in turn becomes the substance of reflection and a symbol for our collective sub-consciousness. The prints are an extension of the Ten Thousand Tears (2007-2009) and Collective Pooling print series (2008), in the fact that they are using my fingerprints as a representation of water and our collective identity. These projects were an important tool for me to reflect upon the environmental, social and political unrest in our chaotic global theatre. However, with Planets, I feel that the "water" is more representative of our human presence on the earth, slowly eroding a path for our existence, leaving canyons and valleys in our wake. The spill over into the larger "pool" is representative of the passage of time and our collective unconsciousness.

The process is a combination of inkjet printing from digital photographs I took during a trip to the Red Rock National Monument in Nevada, combined with layers of monotype and relief printmaking methods. The sky blends and rock "details" are monotypes overprinted on the inkjet layer, giving the print a bit more depth and texture. The final layer is the relief fingerprint, layered in three colors. Each print is 20 x 24” framed in whitewashed maple frames. 

Climate Change
Mary Neubauer

Climate Change is a related series of six 15" x 30"digital Lambda prints created in 2012. They are framed with museum mounting. These works were modeled in Rhino 3D in response to my observations of weather and changing cloud patterns throughout the Arizona seasonal year. The 3D models were surface-mapped with changing weather patterns and endowed with qualities of light and transparency. In larger 96" x 72" formats, three of the same images have been printed on silk and can act as a triptych panel or wall-hanging. The works are largely an intuitive response to what I know scientifically about climate change. Because I also work with data visualization of environmental statistics, these intuitive works have a strong empirical foundation. They are meant to deliver a visual signal or sign of what is to come in terms of climate extremes. For this reason, they use a repeating iconic whirlwind shape as a significator. Sometimes the shape is benign and delicate, but as the series progresses, the storm icon becomes more strange and intense. Accompanying these images is a singular data-driven sculptural form that visualizes 25 years of Sonoran Desert Weather through daily high and low temperatures arranged in a 13w month periodicity. 

Louisiana Re-storied
Meredith Drum


Louisiana Re-storied is an interactive, documentary installation about environmental justice and pollution governance in Southern Louisiana. The work revisits the contact between the oil indu…


Speakers
EM

Ellen McMahon

Ellen McMahon works as an artist, designer, writer, educator and project director to bridge the gaps between art, design and environmental issues. In 2007, she received a Fulbright Scholar’s Grant to work with the Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Beginning in 2010, she served as project director and co-editor of an interdisciplinary collaborative faculty/student research project, which... Read More →
MN

Mary Neubauer

Mary Neubauer has shown her work widely, and she has completed many public art projects in the western states, including interactive sculptural works. In the past 5 years, her sculptures and digital images have appeared in national and international exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Paris, Beijing, and Adelaide. Working at the intersection of art and science, she exhibits with organizations including Ars Mathematica and... Read More →
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Artists
CC

Cecily Culver

Cecily Culver is a maker and experiment conductor; her sculptural works and immersive environments exist in the space between the ephemeral and the tangible.<><>This translation of thoughts began in her hometown of Rochester, New York, where she completed her BFA at<>Rochester Institute of Technology in interdisciplinary studio art. Culver is currently exploring the natural and man-made oddities of Phoenix, Arizona. She is... Read More →
MH

Mary Hood

Mary Hood, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, born in 1966, is currently an associate professor of art/printmaking at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA. Hood received her Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Dallas, in Dallas, Texas and her undergraduate degree from Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Mary Hood’s current research, "The Twilight Hours," exists in the luminous space between day... Read More →
MD

Meredith Drum

Meredith Drum uses a range of new and old media to produce documentaries, experimental fictions, cinematic installations, walking tours, and visually rich locative media. Her toolbox includes digital video; 8mm film; printed maps; 2D and 3D computer animation; mobile tech, and a variety of programming languages. Her artistic research revolves around | psycho-geography; environmental justice; feminism; corporeality and visuality; somatic and... Read More →
PB

Pat Badani

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and based in Chicago, Pat Badani is an internationally recognized artist who specializes in interdisciplinary artistic creation and new media practice. Also active as a critical researcher, educator, editor and curator, she is recipient of over twenty grants and awards. Her work has been the subject of numerous critical essays in museum catalogs; anthologies; and journals of artistic research, science and new... Read More →
RC

Rachel Clarke

Rachel Clarke is an artist, writer, curator and educator living in Sacramento, CA. She is Professor of | New Media Art Cal State, Sacramento. Clarke is the founding editor of Media-N, the CAA New | Media Caucus’s international journal. | | Exhibitions include: "Unmapping" at University of Georgia, fall 2013; "Awakenings" at CSU Stanislaus, | CA, 2010; and "Between" at Reynolds Gallery, UOP, Stockton, CA, 2009. Recent group exhibitions... Read More →
RL

Richard Lerman

Richard Lerman has created electronic music and interdisciplinary art since the 1960’s offering | many performances, installations and screenings in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Australia | and New Zealand. His work develops unexpected textures from natural phenomena and materials, | collected with his own specially constructed transducers/microphones. Using these, he has recorded | audio/video at sites including: fences along the... Read More →
TC

Tanya Chaly

Tanya Chaly was born in Sydney, Australia and currently lives and works in New York City. She is a | visual artist and works across a variety of mediums using painting, drawing and printmaking. In her | practice she examines ideas of the Natural World; the history of Natural Science; notions of nature; | and classifications of Wilderness and the fetishization of Nature. Currently she has been looking at | Ecosystems, and the macro and micro... Read More →

Exhibitors
MH

Meredith Hoy

Meredith Hoy is Assistant Professor of Art History and Theory in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2010 in the department of Rhetoric. Her current book project, entitled From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, traces links between contemporary digital art and modern painting, arguing for a digital method of facture... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Night Gallery 2000 E. Rio Salado Pkwy. Tempe Marketplace Tempe, AZ 85281

9:30pm

Installation event - Grant Street Studios
Check out the robots and the other cool art that is part of the Balance-Unbalance 2105 conference presented at the School of Art Graduate Studios in down town Phoenix.

Saturday March 28, 2015 9:30pm - 11:00pm
Grant Street Studios 605 E Grant St., Phoenix, AZ

11:00pm

HOT WATER--Water, Peace, and War
"HOT WATER—Water, Peace & War" virtual exhibition and discussion panel. Online at: http://water-wheel.net/taps/view/791

A panel of international guests will discuss selected contributions of "digital postcards, poems or texts" uploaded to the Waterwheel website (water-wheel.net) on the theme of "HOT WATER—Water, Peace & War". The call invited artists, scientists, activists, teachers and young people to contribute videos, images, animations, audio, texts or slideshows.

The virtual exhibition and panel will take place on the Tap, the videoconferencing/media-mixing system of Waterwheel. The site is accessible to anyone without the need to log in or register. Online audience can comment in the chat, and join in on the discussion. 

Event URL: http://water-wheel.net/taps/view/791
Event time in your current timezone: http://bit.ly/1BCqqM8 
Online panelists include Leah Barclay, Ian Clothier, Molly Hankwitz and Silvana Tuccio

The call for contributions, released in English, French and Spanish, contained the following text: “The English expression ‘To be in HOT WATER’ means to be in trouble. Currently, climate change, environmental decline, rights violations, volatile politics and conflict all suggest ‘HOT WATER’. Water is a fundamental element for all beings on Earth. A symbol of life and a 'common good' which should be available to all, water is quickly becoming a commodity to some, and is often taken hostage in conflicts to besiege and displace populations. Corporations, governments, and industries such as mining and tourism use it for their own short-term benefits, depriving people—especially Indigenous people and farmers—of their rights, causing pollution, threatening health and the environment, and compromising long-term water management.
 
How can art, science, design, and activism reinstate the social, cultural and environmental value of water? How can we share the responsibility of water in a positive way? How can we all preserve the right of access to water? How can intergenerational knowledge-sharing get us out of ‘HOT WATER’, end conflict and find peace?”

Speakers
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
IC

Ian Clothier

Ian M Clothier is an artist, Senior Academic at Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki New Zealand (0.6), founding Director of Intercreate Research Centre - intercreate.org - (0.4) and co-founding Director of SCANZ (Solar Circuit Aotearoa New Zealand) with Trudy Lane and Nina Czegledy. His projects have been selected for Uncontainable ISEA 2011 Exhibition, Cultura Digital at Rio de Janeiro, What if at Puke Ariki... Read More →
MH

Molly Hankwitz

Molly Hankwitz's current research engages human/social relations--mobile and digital communications environments-- at the intersection ofform, culture, history, and experimental and independent media. Ongoing public space in changing urban technoculture, i.e. the Internet of Things, the "surveillance state", and hybrid "media ecological" wireless/data provides a platform of concerns through which development of cities can be reimagined and... Read More →
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Silvana Tuccio

Silvana's doctoral research at The University of Melbourne was on cinema and the journey of cultural forms from a place of origin to a new landscape. Silvana was artistic director of Sguardi australiani, a film culture event highlighting cultural diversity and metropolitan space in Australian cinema (Genoa 2002-2006). In 2011, the Sguardi australiani Archive was instituted at the Monash University Prato Centre, Italy. Silvana is the author of... Read More →


Saturday March 28, 2015 11:00pm - Sunday March 29, 2015 12:30am
Virtual/Online
 
Sunday, March 29
 

7:00am

Watch Sunrise at James Turrell Skyspace: Air Apparent
Sunday March 29, 2015 7:00am - 9:00am
James Turrell Skyspace: Air Apparent ASU, Tempe, west side of Rural Road at Terrace Road in Tempe

8:00am

Registration
You should register online HERE
This will generate a registration listing and also send you a receipt 
Conference registration name tags will be available to collect at the conference

 

Sunday March 29, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
Stauffer B 1st floor hallway 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Walking with Water
This exhibit is open 8:00 am-5:00 pm, March 22-29. 

World-Wide-Walks / between earth, water &sky / DESERTS
Peter D'Agostino

World-Wide-Walks have been performed on six continents over the past four decades. Initiated in 1973 as The Walk Series, these video "documentation/performances" evolved into video-web projects during the 1990s and mobile-locative media installations in the 2000s. World-Wide-Walks explore elements of natural, cultural and virtual identities: mixed realities of walking through physical environments and virtually surfing the web. Current projects focus on climate change and the effects of global warming to address concerns for a sustainable future related to ‘glocal’ - global / local – ecologies.

It is conceived as a trilogy of walk projects in the Chihuahuan, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts. The installation proposed for Balance-Unbalance 2015 is based on walks performed in the Chihuahuan Desert at White Sands, Los Alamos and Alamogordo. The mix of ‘natural-cultural-virtual’ concepts is most striking for me at these sites as boundaries for the convergence of nature and culture, spirituality and science. Here, at this crossroads in the desert where the ancient Native American stories of emergence from Mother Earth are told, it is also the site of the first Atomic Bomb detonation. ( The “Fat Boy” bomb on July 16, 1945 preceded “Little Boy”, August 6, Hiroshima; and “Fat Man,” August 9, Nagasaki.) One walk is around a “Fat Man,” a bomb casing on display at the White Sands Missile Range Museum. Walks around Soaptree Yucca plants are testaments to natural survival in the desert ecosystem; while another walk through a field of petroglyphs is about a time dating from the Ancestral Pueblo period of c. 1300 to 1600 AD. (Petroglyph National Monument on New Mexico's West Mesa near Albuquerque.)

Pink Noise 
Yolande Harris

Pink Noise challenges preconceptions about underwater sound by juxtaposing an idyllic video of the ocean surface with the overwhelming, yet often strangely beautiful, anthropogenic noise underneath. By involving the audience in an otherwise alien, inaccessible environment, the installation aims to establish a more empathetic relationship to the underwater world through the immersive experience of the artwork.

The installation consists of a video projection on the floor and a sound recording listened to on headphones. The headphones hang from the ceiling, centered over the video, about 18 inches from the floor (like a fishing line). At first, the audience only sees the video of colorful turquoise and pink light reflecting on the surface of the sea. In order to experience what is beneath the surface, the audience member must step into the video and put on the headphones, at which point s/he is immersed in the piece. The hydrophone recording, made at a Spanish National Marine Reserve at peak tourist season, reveals a surprising range of industrial sounds beneath the surface – loud thumps, grinds, and tones from boat engines, anchors and depth sounders. The underwater sonic environment sharply contrasts with the idyllic video of the surface at the same location, revealing the extent of noise pollution even in a protected marine habitat.

Pink Noise was previously exhibited at: Transmediale, Berlin, 2010; Issue Project Room, New York 2011 (screened version); WRO Media Art Biennale, Wroclaw, Poland 2011; MADATAC Festival, Madrid 2013.

Undercurrent
Teresa Connors & Shannon Harris

Undercurrent is one of a series of ongoing generative audiovisual installations which explores the notion of ecological performativity. Here, the term "ecological" refers to the philosophical school of thought which believes the world to be a network of interconnected and interdependent phenomena. Constructed in Max 6, this generative installation layers a network of visual and aural content that affect each other simultaneously to produce an ever-evolving work. The assets of this installation include oceanic audiovisual field recordings from the west coast of Canada, algorithmic data collected from an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), and real-time convolution of audio field recordings with samples acoustic instruments. The intention of this practice is to contribute in an artistic, experiential, and dynamical means to current thinking around material agency. I purpose that by doing so, creative practice can contribute towards the development of an ontological consideration of ecological performativity. By viewing the world as a network of phenomena that are fundamentally interconnected and interdependent, the result is a performative openness to the world that suggests a means by which to empathically engage, from a non-human exceptionalism perspective, with the complexities of being in, and of the world in the 21st century. Undercurrent is an attempt to foster a greater recognition of the ongoing and entangled ebb and flow of agency between humans and the environment.  

Speakers
PD

Peter D'Agostino

Peter d’Agostino’s pioneering photography, video and interactive projects have been exhibited internationally. Surveys of his work include: Interactivity and Intervention, 1978-99, Lehman College Art Gallery, New York; the World-Wide-Walks projects at the University Art Gallery, Bilbao, Spain (2012); and the University of Paris I Partheon-Sorbonne (2003). Major group exhibitions include: The Whitney Museum of American Art (Biennial... Read More →
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Yolande Harris

Yolande Harris is an artist engaged with sound, its image and its role in relating humans and their technologies to the environment. Her artistic projects take the form of audio-visual installations and performances, instruments, walks, performative lectures and writings. Her work is presented internationally in the context of visual art exhibitions, music venues and media art festivals and conferences, including MACBA Barcelona, Schirn... Read More →

Artists
SH

Shannon Harris

Shannon Harris is an artist whose film and video work reflect a creative practice that draws from the particulars and subjectivities of personal experience and landscape. The ways in which documentary and experimental film/video practices intersect, and the potential of expanded notions of documentary are areas of interest to her. Shannon’s work has been screened in North America, New Zealand and the EU. She attended Simon Fraser University... Read More →
TC

Teresa Connors

Teresa Connors is active in many aspects of music practice, being an acoustic/electroacoustic composer, opera singer, film scorer, and multimedia installation artist. She collaborates with many artists from diverse backgrounds and with different sensibilities. Originally from Newfoundland, Canada, Teresa holds a Master of Music degree in composition (1st class honours) from Waikato University in New Zealand and studied both composition and... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Digital Culture Gallery 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Balance-Unbalance 2015: Water Imbalance

The exhibit is open 8:00 am to 10:00 pm, March 22-29.  

Water Imbalance
is a curated exhibition planned for the Balance-Unbalance 2015 conference at the Arizona State University Tempe Campus.

Featuring the work of:
Kim Abeles
Sukey Bryan
Betsy Damon
Danielle Eubank
J.J. L’Heureux
Sandra Mueller
Melissa Reischman
Eco Art Collective


Curated by Sandra Mueller and Danielle Eubank

As the majority of the world’s population, it is incumbent upon women to be guardians of the future. We need to look after our people, our natural environment, and our water. Water is a shared resource amongst all people. It is our provider – for sustenance, fishing, farming and regulation of the earth’s climate. This is an exhibition that makes a statement about the unifying preciousness of water by documenting it all over the world with paintings, photography, mixed media, and installations by leading environmental women artists. 

The conceptual theme of the exhibition addresses the consequences of the human footprint globally by looking at the imbalance of the availability and cleanliness of water. We have specifically examined water scarcity, cleanliness, access, expanding deserts, urban engagement, climate change and diminishing glaciers that all reflect an unworkable imbalance. Artists included a written statement addressing water imbalance. For the visual theme, emphasis is on the view of water from a geographical perspective as well as a state of mind.  – Danielle Eubank, March 2015

Sandra Mueller
Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds. Her colorful abstract paintings and photographs have been shown broadly throughout the Pacific Rim region.

Danielle Eubank
Danielle Eubank is a painter interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. Danielle Eubank is an expedition artist in pursuit of painting all of the major bodies of water in the world. She is beginning by painting all of Earth’s oceans. She sailed aboard the barquentine tall ship, The Antigua, on an expedition to the High Arctic in Autumn 2014. She was an Expedition Artist on the Phoenicia, a replica 600 B.C. Phoenician vessel that circumnavigated Africa and was the Expedition Artist on the Borobudur Ship, a replica of an 8th century Indonesian boat that sailed around the African continent.  

Waste Water
Kristian Derek Ball

As unavoidable as it is, water is something that we as humans have to waste to some degree. But we still have options on how we approach, view and interact with our water-related activities. 

The idea behind this new installation is to raise a hyper-awareness of the process of water draining away from us during its usage. The sonic experience of listening to the phenomenon of water in action and its interfacing with those using it, can lead us into this mode of listening which may juxtapose traditional symbolic references. 

The Human Delta
Rachel Mayeri

A delta is a place where a river meets another body of water. A river carries sediment that leaves a triangular pattern where the two bodies of water intersperse. Human bodies are nutrient-rich water and sediment transportation systems. The Human Delta occurs at the toilet, an effluence of millions of gallons of sediment-rich water, which mixes with rivers, aquifers, bays, land, and the ocean. 

Environmentalists are dealing with the human delta as toxic concentrations of bacteria, pharmaceuticals, and other chemicals in partially treated wastewater routinely pollute waterways. Some chemicals which course through human bodies--heart medicine, antibiotics, estrogen--may adversely affect fish populations and their habitats. Yet, the chemicals which are naturally produced in urine--nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium--rather than be construed as waste or pollution, can be used as important nutrients for the soil in which plants grow. Agrobusiness uses fertilizers derived from fossil fuels and mined from limited reserves, contributing to global warming. A more sustainable solution would be to recycle human urine, treat it, and use it as fertilizer, linking the Human Delta back to the ecological cycle productively, rather than destructively. 

The Human Delta is an art-science project intended to increase public awareness about the human "waste" at its point of departure: the bathroom. A series of posters are installed in conference bathrooms, and are available for distribution. Toilets are interstitial, potentially contemplative spaces, which underscore the hidden, segregated, white-tiled, and taboo nature of the subject. 

One poster is about the flow of pharmaceuticals from human bodies into a river delta. Informed by scientific research which has found concentrations of caffeine in the Puget Sound, the poster depicts the Starbucks logo as a flow of caffeine, hormones, antibiotics, and medicines entering and leaving the human body, and cycling back as disturbed (caffeinated, aggressive, effeminate) fish. Another poster is about the potential of urine as a fertilizer. It depicts a farmer fountain: a stream of water pours forth from kidneys and bladder, fertilizing a field of corn. Text on the poster reads: "urine is fertilizer" / "nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium." 


Artists
BD

Betsy Damon

Betsy Damon is an eco-activist artist who works with water, site-specific sculpture, urban design and community. In 1998, Betsy created the Living Water Garden in Sichuan, China, a six-acre urban park that has become an icon for natural water-cleaning systems. She has worked on design teams, notably contributing the wetland system in the Beijing Olympic Park. In the US, Betsy has worked with communities, bringing together arts... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Eubank

Danielle Eubank

University of La Verne
Danielle Eubank is a painter and curator interested in exploring the relationship between abstraction and realism. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant 2014-15. She is painting all of the major bodies of water on the planet, starting with the oceans. In addition to her studio practice, Ms. Eubank is an expedition artist. She sailed aboard the tall ship, The Antigua, on an art and science expedition to the High Arctic in... Read More →
EC

Eco-Art Collective

The Eco-Art Collective is an activist group of the Southern California Women’s Caucus for Art dedicated to sustainable stewardship of the environment. Participating Artists: Carolyn Applegate, Amy Bauer, Marie Cenkner, Danielle Eubank, Katherine Kean, Nancy Lissaman, Marion Melchiorre, Sandra Mueller, Annemarie Rawlinson, Seda Saar, Louise Wannier, Frances White.
KA

Kim Abeles

Kim Abeles' installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Among her many honors, Abeles has been recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation, Pollack-Krasner Foundation, and the California Arts Council. She is a 2014 Lucas Visual... Read More →
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Kristian Derek Ball

Kristian Derek Ball has designed sound and written music for theatrical and film companies both nationally and internationally, as well as recorded and produced music for various artists and musicians worldwide. He has designed sound for regional and local companies such as Metropolitan Theatre Ensemble in Kansas City, The Children’s Theatre Company in Minneapolis, and Allentown Public Theatre among others, and has spent the last 5 years... Read More →
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Melissa Reischman

Melissa Reischman was born in Portland, Oregon. She studied graphic design at the Colorado Institute of Art and went on to build a career as an award-winning graphic designer. During this time she followed the urge to develop her own artistic vision through paintings and drawings, studying with Richard Bunkhall and Ray Turner at Art Center College of Design. Reischman’s work explores movement of light, color and atmosphere. Her paintings... Read More →
RM

Rachel Mayeri

Rachel Mayeri is a Los Angeles-based media artist working at the intersection of science and art. Her projects explore topics ranging from the history of special effects to the human animal. Her videos and installations have shown at Sundance, Berlinale, Documenta 13, Ars Electronica, The Getty Museum, and MoMA PS1. She is the recipient of numerous grants, including the Wellcome Trust, Creative Capital, and the California Council for the... Read More →
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Sandra Mueller

Sandra Mueller is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and writer who has been on a lifelong journey of social concern and creative expression. She spent much of the 1990s working on the cutting edge of interactive media before returning to make her own visual art and launch the BeARTrageous Creativity Workshops for Women. Mueller serves on the Women's Caucus for Art national board and as a strategic advisor for A Window Between Worlds... Read More →
SB

Sukey Bryan

Sukey Bryan was born in New Jersey in 1961, and grew up in Connecticut and France. She graduated in 1983 from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Fine Arts and English. She worked for five years as a graphic designer in New York with Vignelli Associates, followed by three years of freelance work in San Francisco. She received a Master of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1990. Bryan received grants from... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 8:00am - 10:00pm
Art Building 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Session 4 Panel Stream: Place Making in the Arts
Session 4 Panel Stream: Place Making in the Arts

Deborah Ely, Mike Legett, Keith Armstrong, and Garth Paine: "Strategic Intervention in Art and Science Dialogues--SITEWORKS"
The Bundanon Trust was established 21 years ago by Arthur Boyd, one of Australia's best known painters, who noted that he "couldn't exhaust this landscape" and directed that the 3000 acres of riverside rainforest bush be used for scientific research and agriculture as well as art, education and recreation. Investigations across disciplines have led to surprising outcomes characterized by the sharing of ideas about process, materials and the role of risk and experiment. 

SITEWORKS is a research program centered in an Australian bush location three hours' drive south of Sydney. It brings together local, national and international artists, scientists, professional performers, communities of expertise and audiences drawn from across the region for an annual two-day event at the summation of several months of thematic research. 

The panel will outline the experience of managing and developing the Sitework model and provide some insights and conclusions about its success as a format for bringing together diverse practices and expertises. Conference participants working in this area will join in better understanding and evaluating how threats to climate, water, food and shelter can be addressed through collaborative interventions involving artists, scientists and the enfranchised citizen.

Stephan Moore, Alison Deming, Raphael Sagarin, and Glenn Wayant: "Soundscapes: Barometers of a Changing World"
Four presenters from diverse backgrounds will reflect upon issues of “soundscape awareness” and its implications for understanding the changes taking place in the earth’s climate. 

1. Sound as Place Making. I spend summers on Grand Manan Island off the coast of New Brunswick. My sense of belonging and my sense of being part of something much larger than the human world are keyed there by sounds: crows and gulls; bald eagles, which were never there during my childhood so their calls are always an alarm of pleasure; whale exhalations carrying across the water; the surf sieving through beach rocks. But it is the sounds of work that are most strangely pleasurable and place-making for me: the various sounds of working boats and the growl of the ferry. The changing sounds of work are particularly resonant--a juxtaposition of tradition in the sound of a pile driver pounding weir stakes into the ocean floor as opposed to the gaseous mechanical blowing sound at the salmon cages when workers blow feed into the impounded fish. These are huge cultural signifiers for what's going on at this place where fisheries are collapsing. 

2. As a field ecologist I try to cultivate all of my observational senses, and soundscapes are particularly vital in the coastal ecologies where I work, providing research data (the barks of sea lions), safety (the ripple of a rising tide), and aesthetic connection to the coast. Now that I also work with a highly managed coastal ecosystem—the indoor ocean biome in the Biosphere 2, I am working to understand the appropriate soundscape for our shared research, outreach, and education missions. As we reimagine our artificial ocean with a plan to transform it into a living model of the Gulf of California, do we pipe in “natural” coastal soundscapes (bird calls and waves crashing), as many aquaria do, or do we preserve the industrial noise (air handlers, wave generators) of a working scientific facility? 

3. Synopsis of The Sonorous Desert City Project: Suite I-III, which seeks to reacquaint Tucson (and newly acquaint the rest of the world) with our shared aural landscape through listening experiences and a limited edition recording composed from hundreds of field recordings made over a six month period in 2013. Discussion of Tucson as a sonically resonant city surrounded by the Sonoran Desert --- a sonorous desert ---- with a unique and often under-appreciated sound ecology. Presentation of Tucson's overall tone or audible fingerprint, directly attributable to its unique blend of wildlife, architecture, culture, commerce and geographic location. 

4. As a sound artist and a curator of sound art, I reflect upon the use of sound art to focus the attention of a listening audience on sounds past those within the art, towards those within the environment. I will examine several of the pieces within my recent (and continuing) exhibition In the Garden of Sonic Delights, in upstate New York, for traces of the artist’s listening attention, and in some cases the artwork’s own listening attention, and discuss the possibility of the transfer of this awareness to an audience.  

Moderators
MS

Michael Silvers

Michael Silvers is an assistant professor of ethnomusicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is currently writing a book called Voices of Drought: Forró Soundscapes in Northeastern Brazil and is a member of the editorial board of the Ecomusicology Newsletter.

Speakers
KA

Keith Armstrong

Keith Armstrong has specialised for 18 years in collaborative, hybrid, new media works with an emphasis on innovative performance forms, site-specific electronic arts, networked interactive installations, alternative interfaces, public arts practices and art-science collaborations. His ongoing research focuses on how scientific and philosophical ecologies can both influence and direct the design and conception of networked, interactive media... Read More →
AD

Alison Deming

Alison Hawthorne Deming was born and grew up in Connecticut. She is the author of Science and Other Poems (LSU Press, 1994), winner of the Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets; The Monarchs: A Poem Sequence (LSU, 1997), Genius Loci (Penguin Poets, 2005), and Rope (Penguin Poets, 2009); and four nonfiction books, Temporary Homelands (Mercury House, 1994; Picador USA... Read More →
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Deborah Ely

Deborah Ely is the Chief Executive Officer at Bundanon Trust and convenor of the interdisciplinary, site-specific project SITEWORKS. Prior to taking up her position at Bundanon Trust, an arts and education institution near Sydney, Australia, she was the Visual Arts and Craft Manager at Arts New South Wales, a state government funding body. Previous positions include Director of the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney; founding Director of... Read More →
ML

Mike Legett

Mike Leggett has film and video work in archives and collections in Europe, Australia, North and South America and has practiced professionally as an artist, curator, writer, researcher, producer, editor and teacher. He has a PhD from the Creativity & Cognition Studios in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, the University of Technology Sydney, and a Masters of Fine Art from the College of Fine Arts, University of New... Read More →
SM

Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore is a composer, improviser, audio artist, sound designer, teacher, and curator based in Brooklyn and Providence. His creative work currently manifests as electronic studio compositions, solo and group improvisations, sound installation works, scores for collaborative performance pieces, and sound designs for unusual circumstances. Evidence, his long-standing project with Scott Smallwood, has performed widely and released several... Read More →
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →
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Raphael Sagarin

Dr. Rafe Sagarin is a marine ecologist at the University of Arizona’s Biosphere 2, where he is leading an exciting new project to create a living model of the Gulf of California. A recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship, Dr. Sagarin consults with organizations including the American Red Cross and the U.S. Department of Defense, as well as executives from the world’s largest corporations, on how they can unleash... Read More →
GW

Glenn Weyant

Glenn Weyant is a Tucson-based folk listener and a founding member of the early 21st Century Border Wall Deconstructionist Movement. For two decades Weyant has chronicled the Sonoran Desert soundscape via soundwalks, field recordings and performance. In borderland performances, a keystone of Weyant’s work includes amplifying and playing walls, militarized infrastructure and migrant ephemera with a cello bow and implements of mass... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Stauffer B125 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Session 4 Paper Stream 1: Climate Change and Desertscapes in the Americas

Session 4 Paper Stream 1: Climate Change and Desertscapes in the Americas

Richard Lowenberg: "The Energy & Information Eco-Systems of the Colorado Plateau: A Field Study"
A presentation on initial partnering, collaborations, inventorying, mapping, assessment and creative understanding of the energy and information ecosystems of the four-state Colorado Plateau.

Our greatest local-global ‘Grand Challenge’ is to develop ‘an ecological unified field theory’, integrating physical, biological, environmental, information, social and economic processes, to move our understandings, intents and actions towards the most challenging, yet ultimately most important humane goals of our networked contemporary society: ‘demosophia’ (people wisdom). We cannot address the critical issues of changing climate, water, energy, food or health without better understanding the dynamically integrated matter-energy-information environment, and our need to take “steps toward an ecology of mind”.

1st-Mile Institute’s “Mapping the Information Eco-System of the Colorado Plateau” is a new multi-year project. It is a personal extension of Richard Lowenberg’s having prepared the New Mexico “Integrated Strategic Broadband Initiative” plan and report for Governor Richardson in 2008, and having coordinated all federal Broadband Stimulus projects in the state and neighboring states from 2009-13. These efforts and continuing work now make possible access to greater public and private sector network infrastructure and services data, which has not been used to date for eco-social or cultural benefit.

Mapped relational data layers will include: natural resources (water, mountains, forests), population centers, tribal areas, other primary infrastructure, telecom. services coverage, government, corporate and military facilities, socio-economic strata and much more.

A long-term objective of this project is use of the integrated information mapping as basis for regional ecological-economic modelling. Information, like water, the air we breathe and the sounds of healthy children, is designated as ‘intangibles and externalities’ by our dominant political (dismal science) economic systems. Such ‘common pool resources’ are the true determinants of quality of life. The flows of water, energy and of information are fundamental constituents of an ecological Earth Economy. 

“The Energy & Information EcoSystems of the Colorado Plateau” is intended to creatively augment other Four Corners regional ecosystem assessments, mappings, learning and decision-support initiatives, providing emergent patterns for interactions and interventions. 

Research + GIS Mapping + Drawings + Photographs + + Performance + Narratives + Interactive Web Site

Peter Friederici and Peter Goin: "A New Start at the End of Nature: Lake Powell in the Era of Climate Change"
What happens to a beloved water recreation area—and a place vital to the West’s thin-stretched water infrastructure—when the climate changes? That’s the question this photo/text project examines. A New Start at the End of Nature is a lyrical exploration, in words and photographs, of Glen Canyon/Lake Powell as a quintessential landscape in the new era of climate change. Made with a large-format 4x5 Horseman view camera and a 40-megapixel Mamiya medium-format camera, the color images by a renowned photographer of human/nature interactions present in lavish detail the ambiguities and incongruities that make up the lake and canyon landscape today. The text, by a writer who has published several books of reporting and essays about today’s natural landscape, will examine why the uncertainties inherent in the future of the lake and canyon landscape herald an unpredictable new future for many places around the world. This presentation will be a lyrical exploration of place that points a way to the questions that need to be raised as people negotiate new understandings with their surroundings in a world of climate change.

Stacie Widdifield and Jeffrey Banister: "Mexico City's Water and its Objects: An Archive of Interventions"
Mexico’s past is archived into the present through a host of spectacular museums located in its capital, constituting an itinerary of objects, places, and interpretations. No visit to Mexico City would be complete without a pilgrimage to Chapultepec Park, with its many compelling sites and monuments, chief among them the National History Museum and the National Anthropology Museum. Recently, however, a previously neglected area of the park, Chapultepec’s “second section,” has become an important part of the itinerary for its Water Garden Museum. Here, visitors can experience a number of monuments to the capital’s complex history as a hydraulic city that, since the 14th century, was developed over a series of ancient, and now mostly drained, lakes. The museum’s two centerpieces are the Cárcamo de Dolores, with its mid-twentieth-century water-tank mural and mosaic fountain, created by Diego Rivera, and four early-20th-century towers that mark the presence of enormous underground water storage tanks. Just as the park’s other museums create a particular narrative of Mexican visual culture and history, the Garden neatly packages within a beautiful green space the complicated story of environmental control within the Basin of Mexico. Water is not, however, necessarily central to the display; rather, visitors are presented with a collection of hydraulic-control objects. In other words, the intricate geography of springs, rivers, canals, and lakes that once constituted Mexico City as a hydraulic wonder are now effectively represented or replaced by a network of memorials and plans for future commemorative objects and sites. Such objects and sites thus appear in inverse proportion to the historic disappearance of water -- both potable and flood water -- from view. Using the geo-temporal exhibit builder, Neatline, we will present our ongoing research on the visual culture of the Mexico City water system, drawing from spatial, historical, and visual data to explore the relationship between water and the objects that manage it into and within the basin landscape. In doing so, we hope to contribute to ongoing efforts “reintroduce” the city to its hydraulic history and geography. 


Moderators
NC

Nina Czegledy

Nina Czegledy, artist, curator, and educator, works internationally on collaborative art & science & technology projects. The changing perception of the human body and its environment as well as paradigm shifts in the arts inform her projects.  She has exhibited and published widely, won awards for her artwork, and has initiated, led and participated in workshops, forums and festivals worldwide at international events. | | Her... Read More →

Speakers
JB

Jeffrey Banister

Jeffrey Banister has a dual position as assistant editor and research social scientist in the Southwest Center, and assistant research professor in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona. He is also Affiliated Faculty in the Center for Latin American Studies. He is trained in human-cultural and political geography, and has published on topics of state formation, water policy and environmental history in Mexico and... Read More →
PF

Peter Friederici

Peter Friederici writes about connections between humans and nature. He is the author of several books, including Nature’s Restoration: People and Places on the Front Lines of Conservation and The Suburban Wild. His essays have been collected in several anthologies, including The Best American Spiritual Writing. He regularly contributes reportage and essays to periodicals ranging from Audubon and Orion to the High Country News and... Read More →
PG

Peter Goin

Peter Goin, Foundation Professor of Art at the University of Nevada, Reno, produces photographs dealing with the long-term impact of culture and technology on the environment. Using the language of the fine arts, Goin’s work integrates history, architecture, urban planning, and the social and political sciences in an interdisciplinary manner. He has published 17 books with such prestigious publishers as Johns Hopkins University Press, The... Read More →
RL

Richard Lowenberg

Richard Lowenberg has spent nearly 50 years as a cultural worker/agent/activist, creatively integrating inquiry, understandings and grounded collaborative involvements in non-profit organization directing and stewardship, rural networked tele-communities and information society development, ecological economics research, systems design, new media arts, performance, writing and eco-cultural practices. Director, 1st-Mile Institute, SARC... Read More →
SW

Stacie Widdifield

Stacie Widdifield is a professor of Art History at the University of Arizona and Affiliated Faculty at the Center for Latin American Studies there. She is an expert on 19th- and early 20th-century Mexican art and has published a body of work on national history (including landscape), institutions, and historiography. A number of her publications and research presentations have focused on the visual culture of the porfirian period, modernity... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Stauffer B111 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Session 4 Paper Stream 2: Hydrology and Urban Infrastructures
Session 4 Paper Stream 2: Hydrology and Urban Infrastructures 

Drew Eppehimer: "Water Scarcity, Urban Growth, and Human Rights: Implications for the Arizona/Sonora Borderlands"
The intersectionality of water scarcity, urban growth, and human rights was explored using the border community of Ambos Nogales (in Southern Arizona and Northern Sonora) as a case study. This location is marked by the transboundary Santa Cruz River (flowing North) and by the transboundary, alluvial aquifers associated with this basin, which necessitate binational management over these shared water resources. Through an examination of historical and legal documents and extensive interviews with key contacts, past, present, and future tensions over the quality and quantity of transboundary water resources were illuminated. 

Global market reforms and international free-trade agreements have eroded rural economies in Mexico and have driven migration to cities, which has been further fueled by the establishment of maquiladora factories along the border. In Nogales, Sonora, already-scarce water resources within the Sonoran Desert have been drawn even thinner by increasing municipal and industrial demand. The results have been the disappearing above-ground flows of the Santa Cruz River due to groundwater overdraft, the dewatering of adjacent basins due to interbasin water transfers, the contamination of water due to improper industrial waste and sewage disposal, and the creation of large-scale colonia squatter communities that lack access to municipal infrastructure. Access to clean water and adequate sanitation are human rights, rights that many of these colonias struggle to maintain. Future efforts to provide these critically important human rights, however, will further increase water use and complicate current issues of supply.

The present situation in Ambos Nogales calls for greater collaboration between and understanding among water managers, policy makers, and activists on both sides of the border. This research indicates that informal cross-border partnerships have greater positive impact than overarching formal treaties, due to interpersonal relationships and the ability to adapt to changing needs, and that lasting change needs to be advanced by a diverse “ecology of actors.” This research also indicates that infrastructure maintenance and demand management (“soft path” approach) are needed as opposed to currently favored supply-side management strategies. Continued technical and monetary support for Nogales, Sonora will be key to addressing sustained population growth, the promotion of human rights, and uncertain futures of climate change.

Elizabeth English: "Amphibious Architecture: Where Flood Risk Reduction Meets Climate Change Adaptation" 
There is increasing awareness worldwide that traditional flood-mitigation strategies that alter the environment and create concentrations of risk, such as levee-building, only increase the probability of catastrophic consequences of failure in the long run. Amphibious construction is an alternative flood mitigation strategy that allows an otherwise ordinarily terrestrial house to float on the surface of rising water whenever flooding occurs. Buoyancy elements installed beneath the house provide passive flotation to lift the house, and a vertical guidance system returns the house to exactly its original position upon descent. 

Amphibious architecture rests lightly on the earth and works in synchrony with a floodprone region’s natural cycles of flooding, allowing water to flow rather than creating an obstruction. Since the height to which an amphibious building rises is not fixed, but accommodates the depth of the rising water, amphibious structures have the additional benefit of taking both changing sea levels and subsidence in stride. 

There is growing awareness that homeowners in established neighborhoods are resistant to elevation strategies that disrupt a neighborhood’s appearance and cause daily inconvenience, especially when there is no assurance of adequate protection in an extreme event. Certain types of existing buildings can easily be retrofitted with amphibious foundations, encouraging the preservation of established and historic neighborhoods and their architectural character. Amphibious housing has been successfully implemented in rural Louisiana since the mid-1970s, and in both the Netherlands and New Orleans during the last decade. Amphibious pilot projects have also recently been completed in Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam, France and the UK. Research is currently in progress to develop amphibious housing in Canada, Nicaragua, the Caribbean, the Philippines and elsewhere around the world. 

The presentation will review case studies of existing and proposed amphibious buildings, with discussion of their systems and components. It will also discuss the limitations of amphibious construction, some of the regulatory obstacles that have discouraged its development, and possible paths forward. It will demonstrate that for a limited set of appropriate applications, amphibious construction is an adaptive flood risk reduction strategy that is both more effective and less expensive than any of the current alternatives. 

Gabriel Lubell: "Water Infrastructure and New Music as Agents of Environmental Awareness" 
Infrastructure for controlling the flow and availability of water has taken on many forms, always in response to local needs, geography, and climate. The resultant edifices are generally built on a massive scale, making them imposing additions to the local landscape. Conscious of this fact, the people responsible for their design have frequently included elements intended to be attractive, stimulating, and inviting. Such an embrace of the visual impact made by water infrastructure draws attention to the role of water in our daily lives through direct means. This, in turn, has given these structures cultural and spiritual significance in spite of their functional origins. The combination of practical, aesthetic, and social worth inherent to infrastructural landmarks suggests that an artistic reflection on the subject could yield deep insights into one’s personal relationship with water and the technology necessary for its use in daily life. In collaboration with the Amsterdam-based Intercontinental Ensemble, I am in the process of composing a work for nonet that will musically interpret and juxtapose three historic landmarks of water infrastructure that dynamically explores these ideas. The landmarks to be considered are visually, geographically, and functionally disparate: the Chand Baori stepwell in arid northern India was engineered to retain water; the Catskill Aqueduct delivers clean water from distant points of origin to New York City; and the Ir.D.F. Woudagemaal actively pumps water out of the low-lying Friesland province of the Netherlands. The resultant musical dialog will provide a unique alternative means for encouraging critical engagement with issues of water use and conservation. In contrast to traditional modes of increasing awareness, the composition will attempt to connect on sensual and experiential levels. Sonically abstracting each place provides listeners with a new personal space in which to imagine the mechanics, social and health ramifications, and importance of water both in their own lives and globally. In addition to celebrating these technical achievements of infrastructure, the work also exemplifies the extraordinary challenges a society must overcome in order to maintain a healthy relationship with water – challenges that have yet to be solved in many parts of the world. 

Moderators
BW

Beth Weinstein

Beth Weinstein is an architect whose scholarship and design practice focus on intersections between architectural and choreographic and other performance practices, ranging from the scale of the drawing board to scenographic environments, theater architecture, urban space and landscapes. Working within the severe climate and landscape of the Sonoran Desert, Weinstein’s work also connects to the utopian and environmental lineage of the... Read More →

Speakers
EE

Elizabeth English

Elizabeth C English. Ph.D., is currently Associate Professor at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture in Cambridge, Ontario. She was formerly Associate Professor - Research at the LSU Hurricane Center and has held Assistant and/or Visiting Professorships at Tulane University, the University of Minnesota, the University of Michigan and Rhode Island School of Design. She holds an AB in Architecture and Urban Planning from Princeton... Read More →
DE

Drew Eppehimer

Drew Eppehimer is a graduate student at Arizona State University pursuing a Master of Justice Studies within the School of Social Transformation. His diverse academic and professional involvements largely revolve around fresh water. Eppehimer’s current research focuses on the binational management of water and wastewater resources within trans-boundary basins. His previous Master of Environmental Science from Taylor University centered on... Read More →
GL

Gabriel Lubell

Gabriel Lubell (b. 1983) is a composer of musical esoterica, a term here used to include works for string quartet, orchestra, elevator, carillon, computer, voices, and other such things. His music has been performed in Italy, Sweden, throughout the United States, and was recently featured on the BBC Radio 4 program Short Cuts. Originally from New York, he holds a doctorate from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, where he currently... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Art 220 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Session 4 Paper Stream 3: Trees and Plants
Session 4 Paper Stream 3: Trees and Plants

Thomas Puleo: "Considering Plants as Persons"

In this paper, I discuss to what extent plants can and should be considered as persons, in philosophical as well as physiological terms. My aim is similar to that of animal activists who claim a parallel status for nonhuman creatures, particularly primates and other mammals. I first outline conceptual understandings and practiced engagements with personhood, as derived from work in the arts and humanities, and the social and natural sciences, as well as from pieces in popular, industrial and professional media publications. I then draw upon the research of plant scientists, scholars and advocates to assess and ultimately argue in favor of plants being granted a form of personhood. I conclude my intervention by raising a number of ethical and legal issues that such a radical shift in thinking and acting would elicit for members of modern industrialized societies, and provide some possible solutions that would necessarily be both metaphysical and practical in nature. My overall purpose is to present an enhanced understanding of place by blurring the line between the categories of habitant and habitat, and to highlight new insights into the nature of plants, the most populous and critical consumers of water on the planet, and the hardiest and most productive agents of climate, in an effort to view them less as resources to be exploited and more as fellow creatures to be understood, accommodated and respected.

Katherine Palmer: "Clarinets for Conservation: Reaching Our Roots and Creating Change Through Music"
Since 2010, the students of Korongoni Secondary School in Moshi, Tanzania have participated in an interdisciplinary summer program through the organization Clarinets for Conservation (C4C). The mission of Clarinets for Conservation is to use music instruction as a socially engaging tool for adolescent students and their communities in the United States and Tanzania. Students participating in Clarinets for Conservation spend part of each day learning the discipline of music performance on the clarinet and about the basic principles of sustainability and conservation of indigenous trees. The students learn how to identify and care for trees; afterwards, they take what they have learned about music and conservation to the community. 

During the 2010 pilot program, participants planted fifty African Blackwood trees at one school; in 2012, C4C planted three hundred eighty African Blackwood at twelve public schools and one orphanage; in 2013, the number increased to six hundred forty seven trees at sixteen different planting sites. The trees are owned and cared for by the students and staff at each school; schools will use the value of the harvest to improve infrastructure and the overall educational environment. 

The purpose of this presentation is to provide quantitative and qualitative data collected in 2010-2014 and to demonstrate that teaching clarinet serves as an effective tool to provide interdisciplinary arts education in a least-developed nation. During the course of this paper, C4C organizers will discuss the community need, Clarinet for Conservation’s missions and goals, and the impact that C4C has had on the community.  

Moderators
JP

Jennifer Post

Jennifer C. Post is an ethnomusicologist whose in-depth fieldwork includes research on music in Inner Asia, especially music among Kazakh mobile pastoralists in Mongolia, on North Indian musical traditions, and on rural Northern New England performance practice. Her current work includes studies on the impact of social and ecological change on musical performance and musical instrument production and use in Mongolia and other regions of Inner... Read More →

Speakers
KP

Katherine Palmer

Dr. Katherine Palmer is currently the Museum Educator at the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, where she is in charge of developing and teaching educational programs. Katherine earned a Doctorate of Musical Arts (clarinet) and a Master of Arts (ethnomusicology) from Arizona State University. Her master's thesis focused on the Venezuelan music education program (El Sistema), identity formation, and nationalism; her doctoral research... Read More →
TP

Thomas Puleo

Thomas J Puleo is an assistant professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University. A geographer by training, he studies the roles that landscapes play in the resilience of places at multiple scales (personal, municipal, national, global). Because landscapes mediate multiple processes (economic, political, social, cultural, historical, technological, environmental), he takes a transdisciplinary approach to... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Art 246 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

10:30am

Session 5 Panel Stream: HOT WATER--Water, Peace, and War

Session 5 Panel Stream: HOT WATER--Water, Peace, and War

"HOT WATER—Water, Peace & War" virtual exhibition and discussion panel. Online at: http://water-wheel.net/taps/view/791.

A panel of international guests will discuss selected contributions of "digital postcards, poems or texts" uploaded to the Waterwheel website (water-wheel.net) on the theme of "HOT WATER—Water, Peace & War". The call invited artists, scientists, activists, teachers and young people to contribute videos, images, animations, audio, texts or slideshows.

The virtual exhibition and panel will take place on the Tap, the videoconferencing/media-mixing system of Waterwheel. The site is accessible to anyone without the need to log in or register. Online audience can comment in the chat, and join in on the discussion. 

Event URL: http://water-wheel.net/taps/view/791
Event time in your current timezone: http://bit.ly/1GLWKfC
Panelists at Balance-Unbalance include Leah Barclay, Nina Czegledy, Ilka Nelson and Eric Leonardson.
Online Panelists include Lorraine Beaulieu, Molly Hankwitz and Alberto Vazquez. 

The call for contributions, released in English, French and Spanish, contained the following text: “The English expression ‘To be in HOT WATER’ means to be in trouble. Currently, climate change, environmental decline, rights violations, volatile politics and conflict all suggest ‘HOT WATER’. Water is a fundamental element for all beings on Earth. A symbol of life and a 'common good' which should be available to all, water is quickly becoming a commodity to some, and often taken hostage in conflicts to besiege and displace populations. Corporations, governments, and industries such as mining and tourism use it for their own short-term benefits, depriving people—especially Indigenous people and farmers—of their rights, causing pollution, threatening health and the environment, and compromising long-term water management. 

How can art, science, design, and activism reinstate the social, cultural and environmental value of water? How can we share the responsibility of water in a positive way? How can we all preserve the right of access to water? How can intergenerational knowledge-sharing get us out of ‘HOT WATER’, end conflict and find peace?”


Moderators
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)

Speakers
NC

Nina Czegledy

Nina Czegledy, artist, curator, and educator, works internationally on collaborative art & science & technology projects. The changing perception of the human body and its environment as well as paradigm shifts in the arts inform her projects.  She has exhibited and published widely, won awards for her artwork, and has initiated, led and participated in workshops, forums and festivals worldwide at international events. | | Her... Read More →
SF

Suzon Fuks

Suzon Fuks is an intermedia artist, choreographer and director exploring the integration and interaction of the body and moving image through performance, screen, installation and online work (http://suzonfuks.net). During her Australia Council for the Arts Fellowship (2009-12), she initiated and co-founded Waterwheel, a collaborative online venue for streaming, mixing and sharing media & ideas about Water, as a topic and metaphor... Read More →
MH

Molly Hankwitz

Molly Hankwitz's current research engages human/social relations--mobile and digital communications environments-- at the intersection ofform, culture, history, and experimental and independent media. Ongoing public space in changing urban technoculture, i.e. the Internet of Things, the "surveillance state", and hybrid "media ecological" wireless/data provides a platform of concerns through which development of cities can be reimagined and... Read More →
EL

Eric Leonardson

Eric Leonardson is a Chicago-based audio artist, co-founder and Executive Director of the World Listening Project, founder and co-chair of the Midwest Society for Acoustic Ecology, and President of the World Forum for Acoustic Ecology. Leonardson is Adjunct Associate Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), teaching in the Department of Sound since 2002. He earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree (Visual Arts) at Northern... Read More →
IB

Ilka Blue Nelson

My name is Ilka Blue Nelson. I do not belong to a watershed but come from generations of wanderers. As a Creative Ecologist I work at the intersections of cultural 8c biological diversity, particularly favoring river locales. My work is typical of an ecologist in that I am concerned with ecosystems as a whole, and work at restoring relationships within and between systems. My new studio, Latorica (www.latorica.net), seeks methods for... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Stauffer B125 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

10:30am

Session 5 Paper Stream 1: Value and Aesthetics of Waste and Pollutants
Session 5 Paper Stream 1: Value and Aesthetics of Waste and Pollutants

Michel van Dartel and Anne Nigten: "The Value of Waste"
This paper argues that a first step in finding a sustainable solution for the pressing global issue of "waste" is to consider waste a value attribution, rather than a material condition. Doing so means a shift in focus from finding more efficient ways to "clean up the mess" to changing the way in which value is attributed to things. The paper looks at a selection of recent literature on value systems to identify useful concepts and theory for a value-based solution to waste. Furthermore, art and design are proposed to explore and probe such potential solutions.

Kate Galloway: "Derek Charke's Musicalizing of Slow Disasters, Toxicants, and Energy Production"

In Falling from Cloudless Skies (2009), Symphony no. 1 Transient Energies (2010), Tangled in Plastic Currents (2014), and Dear Creator, help us return to the centre of our hearts (2014), invisible, emerging harmful phenomena such as “slow” disasters, toxicants from plastics, and the sonic and physical residue of energy production are musicalized. These compositions use motivic and textural representations, field recordings, and electroacoustic soundscapes to evoke, respectively, the material impact of climate change, forms of energy production for human use, the environmental damage of plastics and chemical pollutants, and the northern Alberta oil sands energy extraction industry. In each of these sonic treatments of environmentally degradative activity, Charke explores the sonic tactics and modes of representation that evoke waste, discard, energy production and industrial residue, and material transformation. Applying Rob Nixon’s concept “slow violence” (2011), and Max Liboiron’s aesthetic and material politics of artful waste (2013; 2012), I illustrate how Charke finds sonically valuable content produced by, as well as discarded by, degradative industries and practices. Many of the field recordings Charke composes with could be considered unpleasant “noise pollution” or “dirty” sounds, that is, those emitted by energy production and industrial residue. Sounds attributed to undesirable industrial activity and waste are repurposed by Charke to articulate the sonic variance of this under-listened acoustic community, thus drawing listeners' ears to the high volume of environmental damage and waste produced by society for human use. Charke composes with the aesthetic dimensions of cultural and sonic industrial waste and energies that Charke argues exist with increasing “ubiquity”: For example, “plastic pollution [along with other forms of toxicants] is contested, amorphous, and often invisible.” Composing the sonic worlds of these industries in aestheticized form increases their audibility, and perhaps their visibility, in local and global acoustic (and material) communities. Compositions like Charke’s provide another mode to communicate information concerning waste and energy use to a diverse and far-reaching audience, because, as Charke notes: “pollution currently exceeds the ability of traditional scientific techniques to explain their fate and transport, as well as their persistence and effects.”

John Hopkins: "The Energy of Archive: Re-membering the Cloud"
We are living in a time where the wholesale storage of information exerts a dominant influence across the entire social system. The connection between this archive and both the stability and sustainability of the social system is direct. Few people are cognizant that it takes real(!) energy to drive "Big Data," nor are they aware that such wide-scaled archiving directly affects the wider global environment.

This paper reflects on the fundamental energy (thermodynamic) conditions that apply to any ordered system. Order, as a temporal state—whether arising autopoetically or whether created intentionally within a wider structured system—functions as an information transfer or communication system and requires an influx of energy to be maintained. The crucial issue embedded at the root of any archive relates directly to this necessity. Where does that energy come from, how is it secured, and what is the cost? As a near-ubiquitous feature of any social structure the archive—as an ordered expression of information—is one such system. As there are apparently no violations of the Laws of Thermodynamics in the observed universe, is the fate of the archive the same as that of the cosmos: a slow heat-death? Obliquely invoking an interpretation of living (or general) systems theory, it is possible to 1) demarcate the trajectory of the archive (as externally configured (social) memory); 2) examine in the widest conceptual sense the cost of information storage and reproduction; and 3) predict the path that individual and collective knowledge takes into the future. Conceiving reality as a field of energy flows, it is a relatively simple matter to understand the requirements for the propagation of information. From a scale-independent point-of-view, I will explore the problematic techno-social costs of preserving information as the energized configurations of the past.

I will briefly introduce systems theory, as well as some principles of thermodynamics and of code that will, as models, undergird the discussion. Relating energy, order, and information, I will tie these conceptions into the actuality of the contemporary archive: What does it mean to have a sustainable one? As a creative media arts practitioner and, as a consequence, an analog and digital archivist, I will include in the discussion pertinent fragments of personal narrative that arise from that lived praxis. 

Moderators
avatar for Sabine Feisst

Sabine Feisst

Professor of Music, Arizona State University
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American... Read More →

Speakers
MV

Michel van Dartel

Dr. Michel van Dartel (NL) is researcher at Hanze University of Applied Science, curator at V2_Institute for the Unstable Media and guest curator at the Dutch Electronic Art Festival, art center TENT, MU gallery and Energize festival. Currently he also teaches at LUCA Brussels University College of Art and Design and CODARTS University for the Arts. Besides teaching and curating, Michel is associate editor of the... Read More →
KG

Kate Galloway

Kate Galloway is a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at the Research Centre for the Study of Music, Media and Place at Memorial University of Newfoundland. Galloway works in the field of ecomusicology with interests in musics of the 20th/21st centuries, technology, and alternative performance practices and spaces. She is an active member of the AMS Ecocriticism Study Group and the SEM Ecomusicology Special Interest Group.
JH

John Hopkins

John Hopkins is a media artist and learning facilitator. He holds a transdisciplinary creative practices PhD from La Trobe University/University of Technology Sydney, an MFA from the University of Colorado Boulder (where he studied with renown experimental film-maker, Stan Brakhage), and a BSc in Geophysical Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines. His trans-disciplinary research and workshops explore issues surrounding sustainable creative... Read More →
AN

Anne Nigten

Dr. Anne Nigten (NL) is professor of Popular culture, Sustainability and Innovation at the Minerva Academie, Hanze University Groningen (NL) and initiator and managing director of The Patching Zone. Prior to this, she was the manager of the V2_Lab, the aRt&D department of the V2_ Institute for Unstable Media in Rotterdam and project manager at the Society of Media Artists in Amsterdam. Nigten is a frequently invited... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Stauffer B111 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

10:30am

Session 5 Paper Stream 2: Ecology in the Arts
Session 5 Paper Stream 2: Ecology in the Arts

Michael Golden: "The Music In and Of Ecology"
It’s an interesting question to consider whether music has had a crucial role in the evolution of our species, but whether beneficial adaptation or “auditory cheesecake” (Pinker’s term), music adequately defined is a universal phenomenon among humans. If we consider this phenomenon in the context of developing work in ecology, systems science, and neurobiology, the musical activities of humans can be understood as continuing the development of essential processes common to all living things in their interactions with their environments. Human musicking is then an emergent property of the ecosystem, or, in other terms, it is dialogue with the environment. 

A brief survey of work by ethnomusicologists in cultures from around the world shows us that, although the specific functions attributed to music are diverse and numerous, a common thread is that they involve connecting us to our environments, social, physical, and/or metaphysical. The perspective of the Santiago theory of cognition and its successors offers one potential way of supporting our understanding of this function of musicking with ecological thinking. The theory places human cognitive processes in a continuum with all organisms, and includes two key features which are especially germane to this study: “structural coupling,” which is used to describe the changes an organism undergoes in an ongoing relationship with its environment, and the notion that, with a sufficiently complex nervous system, organisms such as ourselves can “bring forth” an interior world, and then integrate or connect it with the external world that we also bring forth through our senses.

These concepts may lead us in new directions, one of which is the possibility that understanding musicking as a fundamentally ecological behaviour might enable us to foster broader ecological awareness, through enhanced appreciation of our nature and our relationships with the environment.

Keith Armstrong and Lawrence English: "Black Nectar and Dark Ecologies: Site Specificities within the Ecological Mesh"
Black Nectar was a site- and season-specific installation, presented after dark as part of an environmental arts festival - Siteworks 2014 at Bundanon, Australia. The focus of this arts-science collaboration was to generate deep sensitisation to the installation site - a naturally occurring amphitheatre set within a dense forest - through subtle audiovisual engagement and augmentation. The work, which combined edge of perception illumination and porous sound interventions, sought to create deeply embodied, embedded experiences, through slowly attuning audience senses. 

The work’s design and aesthetic constructions referenced complex readings of Australian seasonal patterns provided by Grey Headed Flying Fox expert and behavioural ecologist Dr. Peggy Eby. To design the work we drew upon Peggy’s extensive data set that tracked the seasonal migrations of this important Australian mammalian species - as a way of correspondingly understanding seasonal fluctuations. As ‘nectar pulses’ sweep across the Australian landscape, corresponding to the flowering of the gum trees, so these animals follow, and so we used this as a mapping and orientation device within the installation. These reappropriated ‘pulses’, combined with the complex ambience of the location, allowed audiences to then chart personal courses through seasons of change, perception and animality.

Black Nectar drew on a range of theorists including recent work by Timothy Morton, who questions the very nature of what ecologies are, ascribing them as omniscient, entangling meshes, free of any central position that might privilege one form of being over another. Morton builds his arguments towards the idea of "Dark Ecologies", which he suggests create an absence of neutral theoretical ground upon which ecological claims may be made. Correspondingly, Black Nectar avoided any central experiential point nor sought to foreground any one spatial presence over another. Instead the work encouraged reflective, personal and intersubjective experiences as a tactic for foregrounding "improved cultural conditions" within which new forms of ecological thinking & practices may subsequently be triggered.

Kev Nemelka: "The Weight of the World: A Contemporary Art Exhibition of Affect, Reason, and Sustainability" 
The Weight of the World: A Contemporary Art Exhibition of Affect, Reason, and Sustainability deals first with the false division of logic and emotion. Contemporary artists like Greg Caldwell, Joseph Ostraff, Stephen Santore, Rachel Cardenas Stallings, Céline Trouillet, and others confront issues of dichotomized thinking—specifically how the affect/reason dichotomy has traditionally been made tantamount to a male/female, fact/fiction, or STEM/Humanities dichotomy, respectively—by suggesting the inevitability and dynamism of intersection. This paper pulls from the writings of Jacques Rancière and Christine Ross, established writers and theorists who have both discussed collapsed oppositional dyads and the notion of the Cartesian Error.

A second concentration of this exhibition explores ecological aesthetics and the art historical desire of artists to represent their natural milieu. Emphasizing a contemporary push for more conceptual or data-driven substance within environmental art, The Weight of the World considers the fact that affect and reason have always been simultaneously embedded in ecological aesthetics (hence the very scientific “environment” and the affective powers of “nature”). This portion of the exhibition’s thesis is informed by Andrew Brown’s Art and Ecology Now, William Cronon’s “The Trouble with Wilderness,” and N. Katherine Hayles’ “Simulated Nature and Natural Simulations,” all addressing our contemporary problems of romanticization and objectification of nature, which this exhibition aims to avoid. Artists Guy Brando, Edgar Cardenas, Leila Daw, Clark Goldsberry, Mary Neubauer, and others are considered within this subsection of the exhibition.

The final focus of The Weight of the World is the incorporation of sustainability and the necessary employment of both logic and emotion to better determine its prospects. Works by Dan Collins, Lisa Ferguson, Klaus Pinter, PlantBot Genetics Inc., and Buzzy Sullivan illustrate that decisions regarding the planet’s future are dependent on both a rational and a passionate examination of the current state of things in order to create awareness and encourage action within local, national, or global communities.

Moderators
JA

Julie Anand

Julie Anand is associate professor of Photography in the School of Art and Senior Sustainability Scholar in the Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University. Her projects, informed by a background in Ecology and Geology, often explore material culture, body/land relations and issues of interdependency/boundary. Material Histories, large montages of artifacts collected on walks that act as socio-environmental mirrors, were... Read More →

Speakers
KA

Keith Armstrong

Keith Armstrong has specialised for 18 years in collaborative, hybrid, new media works with an emphasis on innovative performance forms, site-specific electronic arts, networked interactive installations, alternative interfaces, public arts practices and art-science collaborations. His ongoing research focuses on how scientific and philosophical ecologies can both influence and direct the design and conception of networked, interactive media... Read More →
LE

Lawrence English

Lawrence English is composer, media artist and curator based in Australia. Working across an array of aesthetic investigations, English’s work explores the politics of perception and prompts questions of field, perception and memory. English utilises a variety of approaches, including visceral live performance and installation, to create works that ask audiences to consider the relationship to space, place and experiential embodiment... Read More →
MG

Michael Golden

Michael Golden (DMA) studied at the Universities of Oregon and Washington, and is currently Professor of Music Composition and Director of the Creative Arts Program at Soka University of America, in California, where he teaches composition, world music, and related courses. His composition work has earned prizes, commissions, recordings and performances around the world. Research into human musicking has led to exploration of this phenomenon in... Read More →
KN

Kev Nemelka

Kev Nemelka is an art history Master's candidate at Arizona State University. He received his BA at Brigham Young University for a thesis on contemporary Hungarian artist Béla Kondor, and is currently working with Dr. Meredith Hoy of UC Berkeley on contemporary faux-naïveté and art and ecology. His recent affiliations are with the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, BYU Museum of Art, The Hunt Museum in Limerick, Ireland... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Art 220 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

10:30am

Session 5 Paper Stream 3: Birds, Places, and Communities
Session 5 Paper Stream 3: Birds, Places, and Communities

Frank Ekeberg and Krista Caballero: "Birding the Future: Environmental Health within a Regional and Global Perspective"
Research indicates we are living through the "6th extinction," where loss of species and biodiversity is occuring at an alarming rate. Across culture and continent, birds are seen as "message bearers" able to communicate the future, announce changes in weather and warn of coming disaster. Having penetrated almost every ecosystem on the planet, birds detect dangers to health and environment before we do. Declining bird populations in practically all habitats signal profound changes over our entire planet, and it has been estimated that almost a third of all bird species will have disappeared by the end of this century. 

This presentation discusses Birding the Future, a multi-layered, interdisciplinary project designed as a series of local, site-specific works that explore issues of species loss and biodiversity while specifically focusing on the warning abilities of birds as indicators of environmental health. Birding the Future is an outdoor installation and image walk with several entry points, incorporating multi-channel sound, stereoscopic images, text, Morse code messages, calls of endangered and extinct bird species and a rendering of projected extinction rate. Most of the benefits, as well as destruction of biodiversity, occur at a local level. By focusing on local ecosystems in a number of regions across the world, the project combines the notions of "site-specific" and "site-adaptable" to highlight regional specificities while simultaneously mapping global commonalities. 

The project poses questions such as: What might happen as the messages of birds are increasingly being silenced? What does it mean that we can only see and hear certain species through technology? How can traditional ecological knowledge be combined with technological advances to increase awareness of our role in and effect on the environment? 

Birding the Future was initiated in 2012 with region-specific iterations presented in Queensland, Australia, in 2013 and Dubai, UAE, in 2014. Iterations for Scandinavia and Southwest USA are currently being developed. In addition to the installation and image walk, the project includes a web site that serves as an archive and information resource for conservation status and initiatives while seeking to map and connect regional issues of biodiversity with a global perspective.

Deborah Ely and Mike Leggett: "Siteworks: Strategic Intervention in Art and Science Dialogues"
Siteworks is a research program centred in an Australian bush location three hours' drive south of Sydney. The first, in 2009, brought fluvial geo-morphologists onsite for several months prior to an event that brought together other earth scientists with local, national and international artists, professional performers and a site-based artist and director. During each of the two days entitled Ten Trenches, presentations from all participants were followed by a series of performances. 

In the following years this pattern was adopted for Siteworks, looking above the ground as well as beneath it. Consistent dialogue with local indigenous people, their cosmology, stories and lore together with performance threaded through each event. Narratives concerned with colonial occupation of riverside locations were a focus in 2010 involving historians and archeologists; in 2011 a botanist worked with an ecologist to build a bark canoe, joining with other artists and scientists working with flora and fauna; nutritionists, a farmer, a celebrity chef and an agrarian professor met with artists who had made work concerned with the future of food in 2012; a night-time public event in 2013 drew a thousand people to listen to astronomers and anthropologists, and a sound performance based on electromagnetic phenomena; bio-diversity in October of 2014 included onsite camping and nocturnal tours to find both art and animals.

The paper will outline the experience of managing and developing the Sitework series of events. The thematic frameworks and specific collaborative projects between artists and scientists will be evaluated for bringing together diverse practices and expertises. Future events will continue with approaches to foster a better understanding of humans in the physical and natural environment and how threats to climate, water, food and shelter can be addressed through collaborative interventions involving artists, scientists and the enfranchised citizen.

The Bundanon Trust was established 20 years ago by Arthur Boyd, one of Australia's best known painters, who noted that he 'couldn't exhaust this landscape' and directed that the 3000 acres of riverside rainforest bush be used for scientific research and agriculture as well as art, education and recreation. Investigations across disciplines have led to surprising outcomes characterised by the sharing of ideas about process, materials and the role of risk and experiment.

Dan Collins: "Community Mapping"
Community mapping is an approach to spatial representation that promotes a sense of agency and active engagement by encouraging “bottom-up” participation by users and community groups. Reviewing the place-based work of an earlier generation of geographers, environmental writers, and artists, the paper provides a context for understanding contemporary mapping utilizing geo-technologies such as “locative media.” The author concludes that technologically empowered artists, partnered with specialists engaged in place-based research, can translate objective representations of place into socially engaged action. 

Speakers
KC

Krista Caballero

Krista Caballero is a transdisciplinary artist whose work unpacks cultural myths relating to the "American" West, technology, gendered land use, and ideas of the sublime. Drawing on the language of land surveying to triangulate what is measured "essential," her work asks how we might imagine a future where shifting ecologies speak to opportunity and possibility. In 2010 she created Mapping Meaning, an ongoing project that brings together a select... Read More →
DC

Dan Collins

Dan Collins joined the School of Art faculty at Arizona State University in 1989. He is founding Co-Director of the PRISM lab (a 3D modeling and prototyping facility) and coordinator of the foundation art program (artCore). Collins studied studio art and art history at the University of California, Davis, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1974. He holds a Master of Arts degree in Art Education from Stanford University (1975), a Master of... Read More →
FE

Frank Ekeberg

Frank Ekeberg is an artist and researcher primarily concerned with the sonic arts. His work explores issues of ecology, time, space, and memory. He uses almost exclusively natural sound as source material, and spatial aspects of the sounds and the listening environment are integrated as essential elements of the work. Ekeberg has composed and designed sound for concert performance, dance, film, theater, radio plays and intermedia installations... Read More →
DE

Deborah Ely

Deborah Ely is the Chief Executive Officer at Bundanon Trust and convenor of the interdisciplinary, site-specific project SITEWORKS. Prior to taking up her position at Bundanon Trust, an arts and education institution near Sydney, Australia, she was the Visual Arts and Craft Manager at Arts New South Wales, a state government funding body. Previous positions include Director of the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney; founding Director of... Read More →
ML

Mike Legett

Mike Leggett has film and video work in archives and collections in Europe, Australia, North and South America and has practiced professionally as an artist, curator, writer, researcher, producer, editor and teacher. He has a PhD from the Creativity & Cognition Studios in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, the University of Technology Sydney, and a Masters of Fine Art from the College of Fine Arts, University of New... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Art 246 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

12:15pm

Lunchtime Concert: Sonic Reckonings
Sonic Reckonings is a 60-minute concert of contemporary music about Antarctica. As the only continent that is governed by a treaty between nations, Antarctica is both a space of scientific and creative inquiry, a source of inspiration and forecast for the late Holocene. The program combines live performances by Doug Quin and Jay Needham, as well as a selection of outstanding works for tape by some of the world’s leading “polar” sound artists, including Philip Samartzis, Lawrence English, and Cheryl Leonard. An essay about these works by music theorist and musicologist Dr. Carolyn Philpott can be found in the Organised Sound Journal. She has a particular interest in musical responses to Antarctica and she regularly contributes to the Bachelor of Antarctic Studies program offered through the University of Tasmania’s Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS).

Moderators
avatar for Cheryl Leonard

Cheryl Leonard

Cheryl E. Leonard is a composer, performer, and instrument builder whose works investigate sounds, structures, and objects from the natural world. Her projects reveal and highlight unique sounds and timbres, often featuring amplified natural-object instruments and field recordings from remote locales.

Speakers
LE

Lawrence English

Lawrence English is composer, media artist and curator based in Australia. Working across an array of aesthetic investigations, English’s work explores the politics of perception and prompts questions of field, perception and memory. English utilises a variety of approaches, including visceral live performance and installation, to create works that ask audiences to consider the relationship to space, place and experiential embodiment... Read More →
JN

Jay Needham

Jay Needham is a sound artist, electro-acoustic composer, teacher, and scholar. He utilizes multiple creative platforms and his works often have a focus on recorded sound, archives, and the interpretation of artifacts. His sound art, works for radio, and visual art have appeared at museums, festivals and on the airwaves worldwide. Through applied aspects of his research, Needham strives to affect positive change and bridge the... Read More →
DQ

Douglas Quin

Described by the Washington Post as “the Audubon of audio,” Douglas Quin is a sound designer, naturalist, public radio commentator, educator, and music composer. For nearly 30 years, Quin has traveled widely, documenting the natural soundscape—from Antarctic ice to Arctic tundra and from African savannah to Amazon rainforest. His recordings of endangered and disappearing habitats represent one of the most... Read More →



Sunday March 29, 2015 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Stauffer B111 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

12:15pm

Lunch/Networking Events - Neeb Plaza
Lunch served in Neeb Plaza (Outside the Art School Building)

Sunday March 29, 2015 12:15pm - 1:30pm
Neeb Plaza 900 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

1:30pm

Place/Site Keynote - Alvin Curran and Eve Mosher
Live stream here

Speakers
AC

Alvin Curran

Alvin Curran is an internationally renowned and award-winning American composer who has received much recognition for compositions involving unconventional instruments, unusual performance situations and sites, and live-electronic improvisations. | | As part of Balance-Unbalance 2015, Curran will give a keynote and direct one of his signature compositions Maritime Rites on Tempe Town Lake on 27 March. | | Democratic, irreverent, and... Read More →
EM

Eve Mosher

Eve Mosher is an artist and interventionist living and working in New York City. Her works use investigations of the landscape as starting points for audience exploration of urban issues. Her public works raise issues of involvement in the environment, public/private space use, history of place, cultural and social issues, and our own understanding of the urban ecosystem. Current work highlights her role as artist/facilitator, in which she brings... Read More →


Sunday March 29, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Stauffer B125 950 S. Forest Mall Tempe, AZ 85281

3:00pm

Coffee Break
Sunday March 29, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:30pm

FLUIDATA: An Intermedia Exploration of Queensland Creeks Incorporating Waterwheel
Waterwheel is an online platform dedicated to the awareness, celebration, care and accessibility of water everywhere. Created in 2011, it facilitates a global network of artists, scientists, activists and interested individuals to share skills and knowledge for raising awareness and finding solutions for water worldwide. Over 3000 media items have been uploaded, which are available for shared use in the site’s integrated video-conferencing and media mixing system, the Tap. Members utilise th